Current Faults News and Events

Current Faults News and Events, Faults News Articles.
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Slow motion precursors give earthquakes the fast slip
At a glacier near the South Pole, earth scientists have found evidence of a quiet, slow-motion fault slip that triggers strong, fast-slip earthquakes many miles away, according to Cornell University research published in Science Advances. (2021-02-16)

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics. (2021-01-25)

UCI scientists measure local vibrational modes at individual crystalline faults
Employing newly developed electron microscopy techniques, researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have, for the first time, measured the spectra of phonons - quantum mechanical vibrations in a lattice - at individual crystalline faults, and they discovered the propagation of phonons near the flaws. The team's findings are the subject of a study published recently in Nature. (2021-01-12)

Machine learning improves particle accelerator diagnostics
Operators of Jefferson Lab's primary particle accelerator are getting a new tool to help them quickly address issues that can prevent it from running smoothly. The machine learning system has passed its first two-week test, correctly identifying glitchy accelerator components and the type of glitches they're experiencing in near-real-time. An analysis of the results of the first field test of the custom-built machine learning system was recently published in the journal Physical Review Accelerators and Beams. (2021-01-05)

New model reveals previously unrecognized complexity of oceanic earthquake zones
University of Tsukuba researchers constructed a state-of-the-art model based on seismic data from the January 2020 Caribbean earthquake. The model revealed considerable complexity in rupture speed and direction, related to a bend in the fault that triggered several rupture episodes. The analysis revealed previously unrecognized complexity of rupture processes and fault geometry in ocean faults that had been assumed to be simple and linear, with implications for future earthquake modeling and a possible interaction with seafloor evolution. (2020-12-21)

Seismic Hazard Assessment: Campotosto, Italy
Between 1997 and 2017, central Italy was struck by several seismic sequences that cumulatively claimed more than 600 victims, besides producing widespread destruction in historical towns and damage to vital infrastructures. Based on the integration of geological and seismological datasets, this new study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin provides a 4D, high-resolution image of a crustal volume hosting an active linkage zone between two major seismogenic faults. (2020-12-16)

Seismic activity of New Zealand's alpine fault more complex than suspected
New evidence of a 19th century earthquake on New Zealand's Alpine fault suggests that in at least one portion of the fault, smaller earthquakes may occur in between such large rupture events. (2020-12-01)

Ancient lake contributed to past San Andreas fault ruptures
he San Andreas fault, which runs along the western coast of North America and crosses dense population centers like Los Angeles, California, is one of the most-studied faults in North America because of its significant hazard risk. Based on its roughly 150-year recurrence interval for magnitude 7.5 earthquakes and the fact that it's been over 300 years since that's happened, the southern San Andreas fault has long been called 'overdue' for such an earthquake. (2020-10-26)

New evidence for geologically recent earthquakes near Portland, Oregon metro area
A paleoseismic trench dug across the Gales Creek fault, located about 35 kilometers (roughly 22 miles) west of Portland, Oregon, documents evidence for three surface-rupturing earthquakes that took place about 8,800, 4,200 and 1,000 years ago. (2020-10-20)

EPFL scientist gains fresh insight into the origins of earthquakes
The speed and intensity with which seismic waves propagate after an earthquake depend mainly on forces occurring deep inside the rocks along a fault line, according to a study by EPFL scientist François Passelègue. His sophisticated models are giving us fresh insight into the factors that can trigger an earthquake. (2020-10-12)

Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface. (2020-10-07)

Earthquake forecasting clues unearthed in strange precariously balanced rocks
Naturally formed balancing boulders could be used to help scientists to forecast large earthquakes more precisely. (2020-10-01)

How earthquake swarms arise
A new fault simulator maps out how interactions between pressure, friction and fluids rising through a fault zone can lead to slow-motion quakes and seismic swarms. (2020-09-24)

ESMO 2020: Breast cancer drug set to transform prostate cancer treatment
A drug used to treat breast and ovarian cancer can extend the lives of some men with prostate cancer and should become a new standard treatment for the disease, concludes a major trial which is set to change clinical practice. (2020-09-20)

Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history. (2020-09-17)

The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement. For the first time in France, scientists had the opportunity to use all modern seismological, geodetical, and geological techniques available to study this historically unprecedented seismic event. Their results appear on 27 August 2020 in Communications Earth & Environment. (2020-08-27)

Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line
Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land. (2020-08-10)

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?
The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-07-21)

Lung cancer in non-smokers likely to respond differently to treatment
Lung cancer in non-smokers is a biologically distinct disease from that in smokers, according to a new study. Researchers also found that non-smokers have signs of genetic damage from environmental carcinogens and that some cancers look molecularly like more advanced disease - with characteristics that could be targeted with tailored treatments. (2020-07-09)

Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. This has now been shown for Taiwan by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in cooperation with international colleagues. They report on this in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-07-02)

22,000 tiny tremblors illustrate 3D fault geometry and earthquake swarm evolution
By mapping the more than 22,000 tremblors, researchers composed a detailed, three-dimensional image of the complex fault structure below southern California's Cahuilla Valley. (2020-06-18)

Natural fluid injections triggered Cahuilla earthquake swarm
Scientists generated a catalog of 22,000 seismic events from a four-year period to reveal the structure of an active fault zone. (2020-06-18)

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes
New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes. (2020-06-04)

FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region. (2020-05-18)

A scalable method of diagnosing HVAC sensor faults in smart buildings
Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are the biggest consumers of energy in a building. For smart buildings, technologies have evolved to improve energy efficiency of HVAC systems, but faults often occur. A team of researchers led by Professor Marios Polycarpou from University of Cyprus has developed a distributed sensor fault diagnosis algorithm, a sequence of well-defined computer-implementable instructions for detecting and isolating multiple sensor faults in large-scale HVAC systems in smart buildings. (2020-05-18)

Research reveals possibly active tectonic system on the Moon
Strange spots scattered across the Moon's nearside where bedrock is conspicuously exposed are evidence of seismic activity set in motion 4.3 billion years ago that could be ongoing today, the researchers say. (2020-04-30)

New study finds connection between fault roughness and the magnitude of earthquakes
A new study led by McGill University has found that tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface can show varying degrees of roughness and could help explain why certain earthquakes are stronger than others. (2020-04-24)

Timing of large earthquakes follows a 'devil's staircase' pattern
At the regional level and worldwide, the occurrence of large shallow earthquakes appears to follow a mathematical pattern called the Devil's Staircase, where clusters of earthquake events are separated by long but irregular intervals of seismic quiet. (2020-04-14)

Making a connection: Two ways that fault segments may overcome their separation
In complex fault zones, multiple seemingly disconnected faults can potentially rupture at once, increasing the chance of a large damaging earthquake. Recent earthquakes including the 1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2019 Ridgecrest earthquakes in California, among others, ruptured in this way. But how can seismologists predict whether individual fault segments might be connected and rupture together during a seismic event? (2020-04-07)

Multi-stage deformation process in high-entropy alloys at ultra-low temperatures revealed
An international research team led by scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered that high-entropy alloys (HEAs) exhibit exceptional mechanical properties at ultra-low temperatures due to the coexistence of multiple deformation mechanisms. Their discovery may hold the key to design new structural materials for applications at low temperatures. (2020-03-27)

Eclectic rocks influence earthquake types
New Zealand's largest fault is a jumble of mixed-up rocks of all shapes, sizes, compositions and origins. According to research from a global team of scientists, this motley mixture could help explain why the fault generates slow-motion earthquakes known as 'slow slip events' as well as destructive, tsunami-generating tremors. (2020-03-25)

Injection strategies are crucial for geothermal projects
The fear of earthquakes is one of the main reasons for reservations about geothermal energy. In order to get hot water from the depths, crevices in the rock underground often have to be created. This is done by injecting large quantities of water under high pressure. The problem is that such hydraulic stimulation is accompanied by vibrations in the underground, known as ''induced seismicity''. A new study from the now points a way that could help to reduce the seismic risk. (2020-03-10)

Researchers develop new explanation for destructive earthquake vibrations
High-frequency vibrations are some of the most damaging ground movements produced by earthquakes, and Brown University researchers have a new theory about how they're produced. (2020-03-03)

Research suggests statins could lower ovarian cancer risk
A genetic study has found evidence to suggest that women who take statins in the long term could be less likely to develop ovarian cancer. (2020-02-18)

Deformation of Zealandia, Earth's Hidden continent, linked to forging of the Ring of Fire
Recent seafloor drilling has revealed that the 'hidden continent' of Zealandia -- a region of continental crust twice the size of India submerged beneath the southwest Pacific Ocean -- experienced dramatic elevation changes between about 50 million and 35 million years ago. (2020-02-06)

Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin
Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces. (2020-01-28)

Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes
Researchers used a novel technique to study the faults in the Japan Trench, the subduction zone where the magnitude 9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake struck in 2011. Their findings reveal a long history of large earthquakes in this fault zone, where they found multiple faults with evidence of more than 10 meters of slip during large earthquakes. (2020-01-27)

Earthquake catalog shows complex rupturing during 2019 ridgecrest sequence
The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence, which startled nearby California residents over the 4 July holiday with magnitude 6.4 and magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, included 34,091 earthquakes overall, detailed in a high-resolution catalog created for the sequence. (2020-01-22)

Southern Arizona once looked like Tibet
The study determined that the Earth's crust in southern Arizona was once almost 60 kilometers thick, which is twice as thick as it is today -- and comparable to how thick the crust is in parts of the Himalayas. (2019-12-03)

Olaparib becomes first gene-targeted medicine to show benefits in prostate cancer
The phase II trial TOPARP-B found that over 80 per cent of men with prostate cancer whose tumours had mutations in the BRCA genes responded well to treatment with the targeted drug olaparib. (2019-12-02)

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