Current Fear News and Events

Current Fear News and Events, Fear News Articles.
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Nonconscious brain modulation to remove fears, increase confidence
Machine learning-based training of brain activity has led to exciting developments: reduce fears, change one's preferences, or even increase one's confidence. Unfortunately, data to better understand the mechanisms of brain self-regulation remain scarce. A group of researchers from Japan, the US and Canada have joined forces to release the largest existing dataset of the sort. (2021-02-23)

A fifth of adults in Sweden report dental anxiety
In Sweden, approximately one in five adults suffers from dental anxiety or phobia. The number has decreased over time, but still an important part of the population have major problems, according to a recent doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg. (2021-02-22)

Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. (2021-02-22)

How likely are consumers to adopt artificial intelligence for banking advice?
A new study published in Economic Inquiry is the first to assess the willingness of consumers to adopt advisory services in the banking sector that are based on artificial intelligence (AI). (2021-02-18)

Difficulties to care for ICU patients caused by COVID-19
Intensive care nurses highlight patient isolation, fear of the unknown and using nurses who do not usually work in the ICU as key factors in caring for critical COVID-19 patients (2021-02-10)

Virtual reality helping to treat fear of heights
Researchers from the University of Basel have developed a virtual reality app for smartphones to reduce fear of heights. Now, they have conducted a clinical trial to study its efficacy. Trial participants who spent a total of four hours training with the app at home showed an improvement in their ability to handle real height situations. (2021-02-10)

COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans. (2021-02-04)

Research finds COVID plasma donation is fuelled by kindness
Researchers have given new insights into why people would choose to donate Covid-19 plasma after recovering from the virus, which will be used to support the recruitment of convalescent plasma donors to help treat current Covid-19 patients and support ongoing trials. (2021-02-02)

Taking the fear out of driver education
New drivers ages 15-25 cause nearly 1/2 of the 1 million+ road deaths worldwide. A new study in Risk Analysis suggests that driver ed programs use of fear-based messaging doesn't reduce risky driving and may even lead young drivers to take more chances. (2021-02-02)

Energy spent avoiding humans associated with smaller home ranges for male pumas
New research shows that fear of humans causes mountain lions to increase their energy expenditures as they move through the landscape, and this can ultimately limit the size of the home ranges they're able to maintain. (2021-01-25)

Children 'not scared' by PPE, says study
A new study from one of the UK's leading children's hospitals -Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool - shows that children are not scared by PPE, and can in fact feel reassured by it. (2021-01-21)

COVID-19: Science scepticism may be reinforced by UK rush to approve vaccines
Former director of public health Professor John Ashton has said that scientific scepticism may be reinforced by the UK's rush to approve COVID vaccines for public use and the apparent political desire to be the first out of the blocks in contrast to our European neighbours. (2021-01-14)

Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children
A study from Arizona State University's REACH Institute has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment. This worry about being abandoned in response to interparental conflict was associated with future mental health problems in children, especially for children who had strong relationships with their fathers. (2021-01-12)

Social transmission of pain, fear has different targets in mouse brain
Social contact can transfer the feeling of pain or fear in several animal species, including humans, but the exact neural mechanisms for this transmission are still being studied. (2021-01-07)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

Covering faces around kids won't mask emotions
The proliferation of face coverings to keep COVID-19 in check isn't keeping kids from understanding facial expressions, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologists. (2020-12-23)

Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis
During the corona crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health. These are the results of a study carried out by psychologists from the Universities of M√ľnster and Bielefeld. The study has been published in the ''Journal of Research in Personality''. (2020-12-17)

LSU health research suggests new mechanism to balance emotional behavior
Research led by Si-Qiong June Liu, MD, PhD, Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, discovered a surprising reciprocal interaction between chemicals in the brain resulting in accelerated loss of molecules that regulate brain cell communication. (2020-12-17)

International study reveals the effects of COVID-19 on the experience of public transport
A team of European researchers working on a project about public transport as public space have recently completed a study on the perception and use of public transport during the first wave of COVID-19. (2020-12-16)

What lessons can medicine learn from Father Christmas?
As Father Christmas gears up for the busiest 24 hours of his year, what skills does he use to get a seemingly impossible job done effectively and safely - and can they be applied to medicine? (2020-12-16)

Sights set on curbing gun crime
A community or sub-culture encouraging young men's exposure and obsession with guns - as well as ready access to firearms and drugs - can make gun violence 'all too easy', with Flinders University experts promoting a new direction on managing the global problem. Flinders criminologists conclude that the need to 'dematerialise' the attraction to gun has ''never been greater'' than ''in a post-COVID-19 world in which guns have gained greater salience in many countries''. (2020-12-15)

Positive messages encourage safer driver behavior than fear tactics
A new study has shown that films demonstrating responsible behavior could lead to young drivers taking fewer risks on the road than if they only saw videos aimed at provoking fear of accidents. (2020-12-15)

The power of validation in helping people stay positive
Telling a distressed friend or family member something as simple as ''I understand why you feel that way'' can go a long way toward helping loved ones feel better, new research suggests. (2020-12-14)

What makes COVID misinformation so tough to stop on social media
A recent study highlights two of the reasons that misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media: most people think they're above average at spotting misinformation; and misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people. The findings may help communicators share accurate information more effectively. (2020-12-07)

Emergency department doctors ask: "Where did all the patients go?"
During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in New England, emergency department visits for medical emergencies - including psychiatric problems, trauma and heart attacks - declined by nearly a third, raising concerns among clinicians that critically ill patients were not seeking the care they needed for fear of coronavirus infection. (2020-11-30)

How lockdown may lead to "avoidable harm" for the health of under 16s
Decreases in hospital attendances and admissions amid fears of COVID-19 may result in avoidable harm for under 16s say researchers. Following lockdown, they found ''a striking decrease'' in the number of children and young people attending the Paediatric Emergency Department at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital in the US and the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in the UK. The researchers said: ''Children and adolescents presenting later on in their illness are more likely to have a negative outcome.'' (2020-11-27)

Can memory manipulation help treat alcohol addiction?
BU researchers were able to artificially dampen fear responses in mice and mitigate addiction-related behaviors. (2020-11-18)

Nearly 1 in 5 cancer patients less likely to enroll in clinical trials during pandemic
A significant portion of cancer patients may be less likely to enroll in a clinical trial due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (2020-11-12)

Sleep loss hijacks brain's activity during learning
Sleep is crucial for consolidating our memories, and sleep deprivation has long been known to interfere with learning and memory. Now a new study shows that getting only half a night's sleep - as many medical workers and military personnel often do - hijacks the brain's ability to unlearn fear-related memories. That might put people at greater risk of conditions such as anxiety or posttraumatic stress disorder. (2020-11-11)

Psychological status rather than cognitive status is associated with incorrect perception of risk of falling in patients with moderate stage dementia
Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling. (2020-11-10)

How does the brain process fear?
CSHL Professor Bo Li's team explores the brain circuits that underlie fear. The researchers have mapped critical connections and teased out how specific components contribute to learning fear. They found a previously unknown link between fear learning and a movement control system. This research could lead to better treatments for people suffering from anxiety disorders. (2020-11-05)

Difficult to build a family after exposure to chemical weapons
People who have been exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWAs) feel uncertain, decades after the exposure, about their survival and ability to build a family, a University of Gothenburg study shows. Women are more severely affected than men. (2020-10-30)

Should I run, or should I not? The neural basis of aggression and flight
Researchers in the Gross group at EMBL Rome have investigated the mechanism behind defensive behaviour in mice. They have identified a specific area of the brain that encodes both spatial and threat cues to drive location-specific defensive responses. (2020-10-29)

Neuron-based gene expression study reveals insights on fear and its regulation
The expression of a gene called CREB in certain neurons may function as a switch to regulate feelings of fear and its extinction. (2020-10-26)

Haunted house researchers investigate the mystery of playing with fear
Haunted houses, horror movies, and ghost stories can be chilling delights, provided the fear they evoke remains in a 'Goldilocks zone' that is neither too terrifying nor too tame. New research connects this sweet spot of recreational fear to a telltale range of heart rate fluctuations, shedding light on the mind-body connection between fear and fun. (2020-10-26)

UMD-led study shows fear and anxiety share same bases in brain
The report by an international team of researchers led by Alexander Shackman, an associate professor of psychology at UMD, and Juyoen Hur, an assistant professor of psychology at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, provides new evidence that fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits. The findings run counter to popular scientific accounts, highlighting the need for a major theoretical reckoning. (2020-10-19)

Study finds athletes fear being judged as weak when they experience pain or injury
Trinity College Dublin researchers have carried out the first multi-centred, international, qualitative study exploring the athlete experience (in their own words) of sporting low back pain (LBP). The study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found a culture of concealment of pain and injury in rowers, leading to poor outcomes for these athletes. (2020-10-15)

Stay in touch with your emotions to reduce pandemic-induced stress
The coronavirus has ushered in a lot of stress. A team of psychologists at the University of Iowa say people can reduce stress by identifying their emotions and taking mindful action to address them. The findings come from a national survey gauging how Americans are faring during the pandemic. (2020-10-14)

'Brain fog' following COVID-19 recovery may indicate PTSD
A new report suggests that lingering ''brain fog'' and other neurological symptoms after COVID -19 recovery may be due to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an effect observed in past human coronavirus outbreaks such as SARS and MERS. (2020-10-06)

Pandemic sets off future wave of worsening mental health issues
Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. A psychology researcher at the University of Houston has published two papers discussing the psychological, addictive and health behavior issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic from a behavioral science perspective. (2020-09-28)

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