Current February News and Events

Current February News and Events, February News Articles.
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Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

Special Issue: Human genome at 20
In February 2001, the first drafts of the human genome were published. (2021-02-04)

February special issue of SLAS Discovery focuses on hit discovery methodologies
The February edition of SLAS Discovery is a Special Issue on Hit Discovery Methodologies edited by Mark Wigglesworth, Ph.D., (Medicines Discovery Catapult, Stockport, EN, UK) and Peter Hodder, Ph.D. (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA). (2021-02-01)

SLAS Technology special collection on AI in process automation available now
The February edition of SLAS Technology is a special collection of articles focused on 'Artificial Intelligence in Process Automation' by Guest Editor Cenk Ündey, Ph.D. (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA). (2021-02-01)

Wellbeing benefits of wetlands
Australians love their beaches, and now a new study also confirms the broad appeal of other coastal assets such as tidal wetlands, nature trails and protected areas including bird and dolphin sanctuaries. In one of the first studies of its kind in Australia, ahead of World Wetlands Day (2 February), Flinders University environment and marine ecology experts have conducted an Adelaide-based survey of how residents connect with and rate the attributes of Adelaide's northern metropolitan coastal wetlands. (2021-01-31)

Financial woes grow worse during pandemic for American families
Many Americans have lost their jobs or are working less because of the shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic. A survey that has been tracking a representative sample of Americans over the course of the pandemic finds that the financial struggles of many families are growing worse. (2020-12-17)

Decrease in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions due to COVID-19 detected by atmospheric observations
Atmospheric observations at Hateruma Island, Japan, successfully detected the decrease in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions in China associated with the COVID-19 outbreak. The weather in Hateruma island is frequently influenced by the northwest monsoon travelling over China, which carries the emission signals of air pollutants. The observed ratios of CO2 and CH4 variabilities showed a significant decrease during February-March 2020, corresponding to about a 30% decrease in China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions, according to a chemistry-transport model simulation. (2020-11-06)

Genome analyses track SARS-CoV-2's early introduction to the US and Europe
SARS-CoV-2 arrived in Washington State somewhere between late January and early February 2020, sparking rapid community transmission of the virus that went undetected for several weeks before this community spread became evident, prompting a change in testing criteria to emphasize individuals with no travel history. (2020-09-10)

February lockdown in China caused a drop in some types of air pollution, but not others
Nitrogen dioxide, which comes from transportation, was half of what would be expected over China in February 2020. Other emissions and cloud properties, however, showed no significant changes. (2020-08-20)

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use
In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones -- commonly known as 'bath salts' -- have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country. (2020-06-15)

Ischemic stroke rates decrease during COVID-19 pandemic
Research reveals fewer people have been admitted to stroke centers in Michigan and northwest Ohio since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, and significantly fewer patients received a mechanical thrombectomy for their ischemic stroke. (2020-06-09)

New study: Stroke patients are significantly delaying treatment amid COVID-19
New research published today in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) shows ischemic stroke patients are arriving to hospitals and treatment centers an average of 160 minutes later during the COVID-19 pandemic, as compared with a similar timeframe in 2019. These delays, say stroke surgeons from the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS), are impacting both survival and recovery. (2020-05-28)

In Israel, public compliance with self-quarantine order tied to compensation
In February 2020, the Israeli government issued emergency rules to contain the spread of COVID-19, ordering individuals considered as exposed to COVID-19 to self-quarantine. (2020-04-09)

Two COVID-19 papers published in PLOS ONE
Two studies of the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak recently published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2020-03-31)

Vitamin E effective, safe for fatty liver in HIV patients
A type of fatty liver disease that commonly affects patients with HIV can be safely treated with vitamin E, a McGill-led study has found. (2020-02-14)

Oceans: particle fragmentation plays a major role in carbon sequestration
A French-British team has just discovered that a little known process regulates the capacity of oceans to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). Photosynthesis performed by phytoplankton on the ocean's surface transforms atmospheric CO2 into organic particles, some of which later sink to its depths. However, approximately 70% of this particle flux is reduced between a depth of 100 and 1,000 metres. Here scientists revealed that approximately 35% of this flux is fragmented into smaller particles. (2020-02-13)

We are more envious of things that haven't happened yet
We are more envious of someone else's covetable experience before it happens than after it has passed, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2019-05-13)

NASA tracks a weaker Typhoon Wutip through northwestern Pacific
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed that Typhoon Wutip has become more elongated as a result of wind shear. (2019-02-27)

NASA-NOAA satellite finds Typhoon Wutip's eye clouded
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of Typhoon Wutip that revealed its eye was clouding over. (2019-02-26)

Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change
Understanding the relationship between microbes and viruses is beneficial not only for medical research and practical applications but also in marine biology, says Alison Buchan, Carolyn W. Fite Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-02-17)

Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions
Researchers at Aalto University have developed new metasurfaces for the arbitrary manipulation of reflected waves, essentially breaking classical reflection law to engineer it at will. (2019-02-16)

Is quantum computing scalable?
Debbie Leung, a fellow in CIFAR's Quantum Information Science program and a faculty member at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, will discuss the challenges of scaling quantum computing at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 16. (2019-02-16)

Breaks in the blood-brain barrier can cause brains to get old before their time
Daniela Kaufer, a professor at UC Berkeley and fellow in the CIFAR Child & Brain Development program, has discovered one of the biological pathways that lead to age-related cognitive decline, and has found clues on how to reverse the aging process in the brain. (2019-02-14)

NASA catches the 1-day life of Tropical Cyclone Neil
Tropical Cyclone Neil had a short life in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean. It developed on Feb. 9 and dissipated on Feb. 10. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that developed even while battling wind shear. (2019-02-11)

Oroville Dam earthquakes in February 2017 related to spillway discharge
A closer look at small earthquakes that took place at the Oroville Dam in California's Sierra Nevada foothills in February 2017 -- near the time when the dam's spillway failed -- suggest that the seismic activity was related to reservoir discharge that opened and closed fractures in the rock below the spillway. (2018-12-18)

Serendipitous discovery by IUPUI researchers may lead to eco-friendly lubricant
Seed oil components of an ornamental flower could provide a direct pathway for designing a new class of environmentally friendly lubricants. Researchers at the School of Science at IUPUI identified the compound in the seed oil that is produced in a manner unlike any other fatty acid. The study was published online in the journal Nature Plants. (2018-08-27)

Pay-backs to Africa from the Paris Agreement's temperature targets
Scientsits investigate potential benefits to Africa of limiting global warming to 1.5°C instead of 2°C. The study suggests that continued efforts to limit warming to 0.5 °C lower than 2°C offer substantial paybacks in terms of reducing heat extremes and their associated socio-economic impacts across Africa (2018-05-16)

Arctic Ny Alesund sees rapid warming, but not the warmest
The IAP team finds Ny Alesund has experienced the fastest warmup in the Arctic, and highest temperature in the recent warm wave. However, this is not the highest daily mean temperature in the historic February. (2018-03-05)

New research: Increased stress on fathers leads to brain development changes in offspring
New research in mice has found that a father's stress affects the brain development of his offspring. This stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of offspring. (2018-02-16)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Gita weakening
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and the GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Gita is it began weakening from vertical wind shear. (2018-02-16)

NASA totals rainfall from destructive Tropical Cyclone Gita
Tropical Cyclone Gita dropped a lot of rain as it strengthened into a major hurricane in the South Pacific Ocean. NASA's IMERG calculated totals based on satellite observations that revealed over a foot (305 mm) of rain had fallen in various areas. (2018-02-14)

Full integration of digital breast tomosynthesis reduces false positive rates, study shows
Rates of false positive breast cancer screening exams fell significantly after complete integration of diagnostic digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), potentially leading to higher quality, lower costs, and fewer unnecessary biopsies, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC. (2018-02-12)

Human antibodies undermine parasite sex
Some people develop an immune response following a malaria infection that stops them from infecting other mosquitos. The antibodies that these people produce are sucked up by the mosquito and destroy the malaria parasite in the mosquito's stomach. Researchers from Radboud university medical center discovered that 1 in 25 malaria patients prevent the disease from spreading in this way. They also unraveled the defense proteins responsible, and these could be used to make a vaccine. (2018-02-08)

For world's poorest, vaccines prevent deaths, medical impoverishment
Vaccines have enormous impact not just on health, but on keeping people out of poverty, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. They estimated that increased investments in 10 vaccines administered in low- and middle-income countries over a 15-year period could avert up to 36 million deaths and 24 million cases of medical impoverishment. (2018-02-05)

NASA measured rainfall from Fehi's remnants in New Zealand
The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall from its vantage point in space. (2018-02-02)

Cluster of resistant tuberculosis pathogen discovered
Between February and Nov. 2016, the Institute of Medical Microbiology at the University of Zurich discovered a multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in eight refugees arriving in Europe from the Horn of Africa. The analyses provided an impulse for launching a transnational investigation and developing a pan-European alerting system. (2018-01-09)

New research indicates the importance of early season control of herbicide-resistant kochia
Researchers writing in the latest edition of the journal Weed Science are providing new insights into the control of herbicide-resistant kochia, a weed that competes with both dryland and irrigated crops across the Great Plains states. (2017-09-18)

Democrats and Republicans draw different conclusions when seasons are too hot or too cold
When the weather is unseasonably hot or cold, Americans across the political spectrum have even stronger views about whether climate change caused by human activity is a reality or not. Republicans are then less likely to conform to the scientific consensus on global warming, while Democrats are much more likely to do so. This is according to the findings of Jeremiah Bohr, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh in the US, published in Springer's journal Climatic Change. (2017-03-13)

Additional Arctic weather data raises forecast accuracy of Japan cold waves
Increased observation of meteorological conditions in the Arctic's upper atmosphere from land-based weather stations and a sea-going research vessels improves the accuracy of cold wave forecasts for Japan and North America's East Coast. (2017-03-09)

NASA examines deadly spring-like weather with GPM satellite
Rainfall from spring-like downpours in the US from Feb. 25 to March 1 were analyzed at NASA using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite. (2017-03-03)

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