Current Fertilizer News and Events

Current Fertilizer News and Events, Fertilizer News Articles.
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Framework sheds light on nitrogen loss of producing common food items
Differences in nitrogen loss intensity between livestock and crops confirm the need for change. (2021-01-13)

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year
One-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, leading to more than a half-billion dollars in extra costs to U.S. farmers every year, finds new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. (2021-01-12)

Energy sorghum may combine best of annual, perennial bioenergy crops
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI) found that energy sorghum, an annual crop, behaves more like the perennial grass miscanthus in the way it efficiently captures light and uses water to produce abundant biomass. The findings highlight energy sorghum's potential as a sustainable bioenergy crop and provide critical data for biogeochemical and ecological models used to forecast crop growth, productivity, and sustainability. (2021-01-07)

Chinese scientists uncover gene for rice adaption to low soil nitrogen
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have found a gene that plays an important role in helping rice adapt to low soil nitrogen. (2021-01-06)

Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data. (2020-12-17)

'Peecycling' payoff: Urine diversion shows multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale
Diverting urine away from municipal wastewater treatment plants and recycling the nutrient-rich liquid to make crop fertilizer would result in multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. (2020-12-15)

One's trash, another's treasure: fertilizer made from urine could enable space agriculture
From the perspective of future societies, in extremely closed environments such as a space station, self-sufficiency in food cultivation and waste management is critical. However, the technology to achieve this is still lacking. In a new study, scientists from Japan shed light on their most recent breakthrough: a cheap and efficient method to make liquid fertilizer (ammonia) from simplified artificial urine, serving an ideal dual purpose of growing food and treating waste. (2020-12-14)

Tanzania farmers distrust fertilizer quality, are less willing to pay for it
Smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa use fertilizer well below recommended rates, contributing to consistently low agricultural productivity. A new study from the University of Illinois finds farmers have misconceptions about fertilizer quality and suggests those misconceptions are a major reason for low application rates. (2020-12-11)

Low oxygen levels in lakes and reservoirs may accelerate global change
Ultimately, this study is crucial for how researchers, and the general public, think about how freshwater ecosystems produce greenhouse gases in the future. With low oxygen concentrations increasing in lakes and reservoirs across the world, these ecosystems will produce higher concentrations of methane in the future, leading to more global warming. (2020-12-10)

Keeping California a powerhouse of almond production
Research shows nitrogen efficiency and productivity not a tradeoff. (2020-12-02)

TPU scientists develop eco-friendly hydrogel for agriculture
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University, in cooperation with the Czech colleagues have developed a new hydrogel for agriculture. It is meant to retain moisture and fertilizers in soil. The difference of the new hydrogel from other formulations is that it is made entirely of natural components and degrades in soil into nontoxic products to humans, animals, and plants. The research results are published in the Journal of Cleaner Production (IF: 7, 246; Q1). (2020-11-29)

Microbes help unlock phosphorus for plant growth
A research team led by the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has shown that microbes taken from trees growing beside pristine mountain-fed streams in Western Washington could make phosphorus trapped in soils more accessible to agricultural crops. (2020-11-24)

For asymbiotic growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, feed them fatty acids
Scientists around the world have been working to grow arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi without their host plants because they can be used as organic fertilizer in agriculture and forestry. AM fungi help plants receive nutrients from the soil through a network that is efficient and far more reaching than their own roots can provide. Shinshu University group successfully demonstrated that AM fungi can be grown asymbiotically when given myristate as a carbon and energy source. (2020-11-09)

Keeping our cool
Fossil fuel burning accounts for the majority of global greenhouse gas emissions, and to the world's credit, several countries are working to reduce their use and the heat-trapping emissions that ensue. The goal is to keep global temperatures under a 1.5° to 2°C increase above preindustrial levels -- the upper limits of the Paris Climate Agreement. (2020-11-05)

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c. (2020-10-22)

RUDN University soil scientist: Paddy soil fertilization can help reduce greenhouse effect
A soil scientist from RUDN University discovered the effect of fertilization on the ability of the soil to retain carbon. To understand this mechanism, he and his team studied the movement of organic carbon in the soil of rice paddies. The results of the study can help increase the fertility of the paddies while at the same time reducing the volume of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. (2020-10-16)

Researchers find increases in nitrous oxide emissions, outpacing global predictions
The term ''greenhouse gas'' is often used interchangeably with carbon dioxide, due to its prevalence in our atmosphere - more than 80 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, estimates the Environmental Protection Agency. But another greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O), can have effects with far greater impact. And, according to a recent study, N2O emissions are increasing at a ''devastating'' rate, faster than predictions introduced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2020-10-08)

Phosphorus deficit may disrupt regional food supply chains
Phosphorus-based fertilizer is essential in modern agriculture. In regions with high population growth, more phosphorus will be needed to produce more food. A new study shows that world regions with high population growth rates are also the regions with the highest phosphorus deficit. It also quantifies the environmental impact of a business-as-usual scenario in the phosphorus supply chain to 2050 and identifies alarming rates of pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the phosphorus supply. (2020-10-07)

Global food production poses an increasing climate threat
According to the authors of a new study published in Nature, rising nitrous oxide emissions are putting reaching climate goals and the objectives of the Paris Agreement in jeopardy. (2020-10-07)

N2O emissions pose an increasing climate threat, finds breakthrough study
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study by an international team of scientists. The growing use of nitrogen fertilizers in the production of food worldwide is increasing atmospheric concentrations of N2O - a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide (CO2) that remains in the atmosphere for more than 100 years. (2020-10-07)

Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry. (2020-09-18)

Ammonium triggers formation of lateral roots
Despite the importance of changes in root architecture to exploit local nutrient patches, mechanisms integrating external nutrient signals into the root developmental program remain poorly understood. ''Here, we show for the first time that local ammonium supply stimulates the accumulation of auxin in the root vasculature and promotes auxin diffusion and lateral root formation to build a highly branched root system'', says Prof. Nicolaus von Wirén from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK). (2020-09-11)

Detecting soil-surface ozone early can help prevent damage to grapes and apples
Farmers and fruit growers report that climate change is leading to increased ozone concentrations on the soil surface in their fields and orchards, which can cause irreversible plant damage, reduce crop yields and threaten the food supply. Trisha Andrew and colleagues at UMass Amherst, writing in Science Advances, show that her lab's method of vapor-depositing conducting polymer ''tattoos'' on plant leaves can accurately detect and measure such ozone damage, even at low exposure levels. (2020-09-08)

Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers. (2020-09-04)

Study finds insect shows promise as a good, sustainable food source
With global food on the rise, a study led by IUPUI scientists has found new evidence that the yellow mealworm shows promise as alternative source of nutritional protein. (2020-08-31)

Native trees thrive in teak plantations and may protect the Panama Canal
Teak often underperforms on poor soils. By planting valuable native trees in existing teak plantations, researchers will evaluate the potential increase in timber value, biodiversity value and ecosystem services provided. (2020-08-13)

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur in the environment
New research identifies fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands as the largest source of sulfur in the environment -- up to 10 times higher than the peak sulfur load seen in the second half of the 20th century, during the days of acid rain. (2020-08-10)

Stronger rains in warmer climate could lessen heat damage to crops, says study
Intensified rainstorms predicted for many parts of the United States as a result of warming climate may have a modest silver lining: they could more efficiently water some major crops, and this would at least partially offset the far larger projected yield declines caused by the rising heat itself. (2020-08-10)

Researchers hope to save seabirds by calculating the value of their poop
To raise awareness of the importance of seabirds to people and the ecosystems we depend on, a Science & Society article appearing August 6 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution looks at something that most of us find off-putting: their poop. The researchers say that the poop, known as guano and which serves as a source of fertilizer and a key contribution to marine ecosystems, could be worth more than $470 million annually. (2020-08-06)

Fostering a sustainable use of phosphorus
Phosphorus is critical to food security, ecosystem functioning and human activities. Urbanization and dietary changes, and in particular industrial use of P for chemical fertilizer production, have determined a declining trend especially in the last decades. A study recently published on Nature food realized with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation provides some suggestions on how to address this critical issue while protecting food security. (2020-07-27)

New evidence for a dynamic metallocofactor during nitrogen gas reduction
A key mystery about the gas comprising most of our atmosphere is closer to being solved following a discovery by University of California, Irvine biologists. Their findings are the first step in understanding the biological mechanism for breaking down nitrogen gas. Besides yielding groundbreaking knowledge, the information holds promise for developing environmentally friendly and cheaper ways to make products such as fertilizer and fuel. The team's research has just been published in the journal Science. (2020-07-16)

Examine narratives to end policy deadlock, boost agricultural development in Africa, economists say
Impasse over dominant and counter approaches-- state-led or market-led policy-- to promote agricultural development in Africa could be solved by analyzing the one-sided narratives that shape this dichotomy. (2020-07-13)

GPS isn't just for road trips anymore
Precision agriculture technologies can improve efficiency on smaller farms (2020-07-01)

Newly discovered plant gene could boost phosphorus intake
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered an important gene in plants that could help agricultural crops collaborate better with underground fungi -- providing them with wider root networks and helping them to absorb phosphorus. The discovery has the potential to increase agricultural efficiency and benefit the environment. (2020-06-16)

Effects of potassium fertilization in pear trees
Potassium fertilization effects on quality, economics, and yield in pear orchard. (2020-06-11)

Human waste could help combat global food insecurity
Researchers from Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan have proven it is possible to create nitrogen-rich fertilizer by combining the solid and liquid components of human waste. (2020-06-02)

How to boost plant biomass: Biologists uncover molecular link between nutrient availability, growth
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plant genomic scientists at New York University's Center for Genomics & Systems Biology discovered the missing piece in the molecular link between a plant's perception of the nitrogen dose in its environment and the dose-responsive changes in its biomass. (2020-05-11)

How does nitrogen dynamics affect carbon and water budgets in China?
Scientists investigate how nitrogen dynamics affects carbon and water budgets in China by incorporating the terrestrial nitrogen cycle into the Noah Land Surface Model. (2020-05-06)

Sustainable recovery of nutrients from urine
Most ammonia capture is done through the Haber-Bosch (HB) process, an energy-intensive technique used to produce fertilizer that accounts for 1-2% of the world's annual energy consumption. Columbia engineers report they have recovered ammonia through a new method with a very low level of energy, approx 1/5 of the energy used by HB. And because the technique recycles ammonia in a closed loop, the ammonia can be recaptured for reuse in fertilizer, household cleaners, etc. (2020-05-06)

Climate-smart agricultural practices increase maize yield in Malawi
Climate change creates extreme weather patterns that are especially challenging for people in developing countries and can severely impact agricultural yield and food security. International aid organizations have invested billions of dollars in promoting climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices, but the effects of those programs are rarely documented. A new University of Illinois study helps provide such documentation. (2020-04-30)

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