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Current Fertilizer News and Events, Fertilizer News Articles.
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Digital agriculture paves the road to agricultural sustainability
In a study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers outline how to develop a more sustainable land management system through data collection and stakeholder buy-in. (2020-04-22)

Mismanagment, not tampering, at root of supply problems for Ugandan farmers
For years, speculation about the poor quality of vital agricultural supplies in the African nation of Uganda has focused on questions of deliberate tampering with products -- adding rocks to bags of seed in order to charge more money for the heavier product, for instance. But in a recent publication, two UConn researchers found no evidence of deliberate adulteration -- but plenty of proof that mismanagement and inadequate infrastructure pose a significant problem for Ugandan farmers. (2020-04-17)

Returning land to nature with high-yield farming
The expansion of farmlands to meet the growing food demand of the world's ever expanding population places a heavy burden on natural ecosystems. A new IIASA study however shows that about half the land currently needed to grow food crops could be spared if attainable crop yields were achieved globally and crops were grown where they are most productive. (2020-04-16)

Livestock and poultry farming should be the future focus of agricultural ammonia emissions control
Livestock and poultry farming is the largest contributor to agricultural ammonia emissions and should be the future focus of agricultural ammonia emissions control. (2020-04-13)

Integrated crop-livestock systems in paddy fields: New strategies for flooded rice nutrition
Integrated crop-livestock system brings more sustainability to flooded rice. (2020-04-09)

An antibiotic masquerading as a natural compound in the Giant Madeiran Squill
A previous study has shown that a type of squill growing in Madeira produces a chemical compound that may be useful as a medicinal drug. But a new study from researchers at Uppsala University has shown that this is probably not true: instead, the plant had likely accumulated antibiotics from contaminated soil. (2020-04-03)

Control of anthropogenic atmospheric emissions can improve water quality in seas
A new HKU research highlighted the importance of reducing fossil fuel combustion not only to curb the trend of global warming, but also to improve the quality of China's coastal waters. The findings were recently published in the prestigious journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2020-03-27)

Reducing reliance on nitrogen fertilizers with biological nitrogen fixation
Crop yields have increased substantially over the past decades, occurring alongside the increasing use of nitrogen fertilizer. While nitrogen fertilizer benefits crop growth, it has negative effects on the environment and climate, as it requires a great amount of energy to produce. Many scientists are seeking ways to develop more sustainable practices that maintain high crop yields with reduced inputs. (2020-03-26)

Ammonia has been wrongly missing in portraying air pollution impacts
Ammonia plays a vital role in nitrogen deposition and haze pollution. To make things worse, atmospheric ammonia concentrations have increased worldwide in recent decades. Scientists suggest the next generation of field experiments simulating nitrogen deposition should further consider ammonia. (2020-03-20)

Surprise! Ammonia emitted from fertilized paddy fields mostly doesn't end up in the air
A new study indicates that ammonia deposition in the neighborhood of sources can largely reduce the amount of emitted ammonia entering the atmosphere, and thus can reduce atmospheric ammonia pollution. (2020-03-20)

Ancient hornwort genomes could lead to crop improvement
An international research team led by the University of Zurich and the Boyce Thompson Institute illuminate the origin of land plants by analyzing the first hornwort genomes. In this ancient group of land plants, they discovered genes that could help crops grow more efficiently with less synthetic fertilizer. (2020-03-16)

Hornwort genomes could lead to crop improvement
Fay-Wei Li from the Boyce Thompson Institute and researchers from across the globe sequenced the genomes of three hornworts, illuminating the dawn of land plants. The group also discovered genes that likely underpin the plants' special methods of acquiring carbon and nitrogen. The findings could lead to the development of crops that produce higher yields with the use of less synthetic fertilizer. (2020-03-13)

Invisible plastics in water
A Washington State University research team has found that nanoscale particles of the most commonly used plastics tend to move through the water supply, especially in fresh water, or settle out in wastewater treatment plants, where they end up as sludge, in landfills, and often as fertilizer. (2020-03-13)

Some domesticated plants ignore beneficial soil microbes
A review by biologists at UC Riverside and Washington State University, Vancouver finds that plant domestication has often had a negative effect on plant microbiomes, making domesticated plants more dependent on fertilizer and other soil amendments than their wild relatives. To make crops more productive and sustainable, the authors recommend reintroduction of genes from the wild relatives of commercial crops that restore domesticated plants' ability to interact with beneficial soil microbes. (2020-03-10)

Recovering phosphorus from corn ethanol production can help reduce groundwater pollution
Dried distiller's grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product from corn ethanol processing, is commonly used as feed for cattle, swine and poultry. However, DDGS contains more phosphorus than the animals need. The excess ends up in manure and drains into the watershed, promoting algae production and contributing to dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. A new study from University of Illinois provides a simple method to recover phosphorus from DDGS in dry grind processing. (2020-03-06)

Is there a technological solution to aquatic dead zones?
Could pumping oxygen-rich surface water into the depths of lakes, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters help ameliorate dangerous dead zones? New work led by Carnegie's David Koweek and Ken Caldeira says yes, although they caution that further research would be needed to understand any possible side effects before implementing such an approach. (2020-03-02)

Big data helps farmers adapt to climate variability
A new MSU study is the first to precisely quantify soil and landscape features and spatial and temporal yield variations in response to climate variability. (2020-02-27)

Super-urinators among the mangroves: Excretory gifts from estuary's busiest fish promote ecosystem health
A new University of Michigan-led study of individually radio-tracked tropical fish in a Bahamian mangrove estuary highlights the importance of highly active individuals in maintaining ecosystem health. (2020-02-26)

Flushing nitrogen from seawater-based toilets
With about half the world's population living close to the coast, using seawater to flush toilets could be possible with a salt-tolerant bacterium. (2020-02-03)

In Cuba, cleaner rivers follow greener farming
For the first time in more than 50 years, a joint team of Cuban and US scientists studied the water quality of twenty-five Cuban rivers and found little damage after centuries of sugarcane production. They also found nutrient pollution in Cuba's rivers much lower than the Mississippi River. Cuba's shift to conservation agriculture after the collapse of the Soviet Union -- and reduced use of fertilizers on cropland -- may be a primary cause. (2020-01-30)

Nitrogen fertilizers finetune composition of individual members of the tomato microbiota
Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients as is a key component for healthy crop production globally. Because the microbiota is crucial to the plant's ability to take in nitrogen, scientists are very interested in identifying ways to ensure this transfer. (2020-01-29)

Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. (2020-01-22)

Urine reuse as fertilizer is not likely to transfer antibiotic resistance
Urine is a goldmine of useful substances that can be captured and converted into products such as fertilizer. However, going 'green' with urine carries some potential risks. For instance, DNA released from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in urine could transfer resistance to other organisms at the site where the fertilizer is used. Now, research published in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology (ES&T) shows this risk is likely to be minimal. (2020-01-22)

Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources
Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer. The work could help farmers around the world use less man-made fertilizers to grow important food crops like wheat, corn, and soybeans. (2020-01-15)

Nanosatellites improve detection of early-season corn nitrogen stress
For corn growers, the decision of when and how much nitrogen fertilizer to apply is a perennial challenge. Scientists at the University of Illinois have shown that nanosatellites known as CubeSats can detect nitrogen stress early in the season, potentially giving farmers a chance to plan in-season nitrogen fertilizer applications and alleviate nutrient stress for crops. (2020-01-13)

Rural water wells in High Plains Aquifer show large increase in nitrate levels
Private well owners should test water quality annually, according to a recent Kansas State University study that revealed nitrate levels in shallow wells above US Environment Protection Act standards. (2020-01-07)

Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems
Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter. There are much lower levels of cotton residue in these systems, which limits the effectiveness of the no-till approach to improve soil health. (2020-01-06)

Helping plant nurseries reduce runoff
Researchers identify production strategies to help manage phosphorus. (2019-12-11)

Consider soil in fall-applied ammonia rates, Illinois study says
Fall-applied anhydrous ammonia may not fulfill as much of corn's nitrogen needs as previously assumed. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the effectiveness of the practice depends on the soil. (2019-12-09)

How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?
Crops today never see their parents' microbiome, so how do they develop a leaf microbial community that's healthy and resistant to invasion by pathogens? UC Berkeley biologists sequenced the microbiomes of tomatoes through four generations and saw three-quarters of the bacteria disappear, leaving a core community that proved resistant to random invaders. The findings show it's possible to cultivate a robust plant microbiome, and suggests that probiotic additions could survive on crops, providing lasting benefits. (2019-12-06)

Microwave treatment is an inexpensive way to clean heavy metals from treated sewage
A team of Florida State University researchers studying new methods to remove toxic heavy metals from biosolids -- the solid waste left over after sewage treatment -- found the key is a brief spin through a microwave. (2019-12-05)

Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon
Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields. (2019-12-05)

Light-trapping nanocubes drive inexpensive multispectral camera
Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated photodetectors that could span an unprecedented range of light frequencies through on-chip spectral filters created by tailored electromagnetic materials. The combination of multiple photodetectors with different frequency responses on a single chip could enable lightweight, inexpensive multispectral cameras for applications such as cancer surgery, food safety inspection and precision agriculture. (2019-11-25)

Coated seeds may enable agriculture on marginal lands
Providing seeds with a protective coating that also supplies essential nutrients to the germinating plant could make it possible to grow crops in otherwise unproductive soils, according to new research at MIT. (2019-11-25)

Reservoir management could help prevent toxic algal blooms in Great Lakes
Managing reservoirs for water quality, not just flood control, could be part of the solution to the growth of toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes, especially Lake Erie, every summer. (2019-11-19)

Nitrous oxide levels are on the rise
Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas and one of the main stratospheric ozone depleting substances on the planet. According to new research, we are releasing more of it into the atmosphere than previously thought. (2019-11-18)

Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is on the rise
A new study from an international group of scientists finds we are releasing more of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide into the atmosphere than previously thought. (2019-11-18)

Palm oil: Less fertilizer and no herbicide but same yield?
Environmentally friendlier palm oil production could be achieved with less fertilizer and no herbicide, while maintaining profits. These are the encouraging preliminary results of the first two years of a large-scale oil palm management experiment by an international team of researchers led by the University of Göttingen. The research was published in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change. (2019-11-05)

Using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions
The University of Pittsburgh's James McKone's research on using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions is featured in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A's Emerging Investigators special issue. (2019-10-29)

The use of sugarcane straw for bioenergy is an opportunity, but there are pros and cons
Brazilian researchers calculated the amount of nutrients in sugarcane leaves, which are normally left on the ground after harvest, and the equivalent in fertilizer required to maintain crop yield if the straw is removed. (2019-10-29)

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