Current Fibroblasts News and Events

Current Fibroblasts News and Events, Fibroblasts News Articles.
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Bioengineered hybrid muscle fiber for regenerative medicine
Scientists regenerate damaged muscle tissue using cell reprogramming technology and natural-synthetic hybrid scaffold. (2021-02-21)

Drug is promising against pancreatic and breast cancers
The drug is effective at treating pancreatic cancer and prolonging survival in mice, according to a study published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. A second study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows the drug is also effective against triple-negative breast cancer, a fast-growing and hard-to-treat type of breast cancer that carries a poor prognosis. Clinical trials are set to begin in 2021. (2021-02-09)

Study finds potential therapeutic targets to inhibit colorectal cancer progression
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues have revealed that colorectal cancer tissues contain at least two types of fibroblasts, namely, cancer-promoting fibroblasts and cancer-restraining fibroblasts, and that the balance between them is largely involved in the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings suggest that artificially altering the balance between the two types of cells could curb the spread of colorectal cancer tumors, which may become an effective strategy for preventing cancer progression. (2021-01-30)

New insights into wound healing process
Biomedical engineers developed a technique to observe wound healing in real time, discovering a central role for cells known as fibroblasts. The work, reported in APL Bioengineering, is the first demonstration of a wound closure model within human vascularized tissue in a petri dish. (2021-01-19)

Compound derived from thunder god vine could help pancreatic cancer patients
The results of a pre-clinical study led by researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, suggest how a compound derived from the thunder god vine -- an herb used in China for centuries to treat joint pain, swelling and fever -- is able to kill cancer cells and potentially improve clinical outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer. (2020-12-14)

Disrupting the cellular process that promotes pancreatic cancer's deadly growth
Researchers say they've identified a way to disrupt a process that promotes the growth of pancreatic cancers -- one of the most difficult and deadly cancers to treat. (2020-12-08)

New immunotherapeutic approach takes aim at cancer's enzyme shield
A Brigham team observed that in a range of mouse models, inhibiting the protein SerpinB9 with a small molecule reduced tumor growth both by weakening the tumor's defense mechanisms and by triggering cell death in the tumors themselves. (2020-12-01)

Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells. (2020-11-30)

Non-hereditary mutation acts as natural gene therapy in patient with rare disease
Scientists at a research center supported by FAPESP identified a non-inherited mutation in blood cells from a patient with GATA2 deficiency that may have prevented bone marrow failure and other clinical manifestations. (2020-11-17)

Age is a primary determinant of melanoma treatment resistance, two studies find
Age may cause identical cancer cells with the same mutations to behave differently. In animal and laboratory models of melanoma cells, age was a primary factor in treatment response. (2020-11-02)

Oncotarget: Induction of phenotypic changes in HER2-postive breast cancer cells
The cover for issue 30 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''RNAseq results demonstrating differences between normal, cancer, and redirected cells,'' by Frank-Kamenetskii, et al. which reported that the influence of breast cancer cells on normal cells of the microenvironment, such as fibroblasts and macrophages, has been heavily studied but the influence of normal epithelial cells on breast cancer cells has not. (2020-10-17)

Vanderbilt researchers make counterintuitive discoveries about immune-like characteristics of cells
Biologists reveal that tissue perturbations by chemotherapy agents promote stem cell expansion and that fibroblast cells exhibit unexpected, immune-like behavior. (2020-10-15)

Researchers discover a cell type responsible for cardiac repair after infarction
The researcher of the Faculty of Science of the UMA Adrián Ruiz-Villalba, who is also member of the Andalusian Center for Nanomedicine and Biotechnology (BIONAND) and the Biomedical Research Institute of Malaga (IBIMA), is the first author of an international study that has identified the heart cells in charge of repairing the damage caused to this organ after infarction. This study has been recently published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, first in the world dedicated to cardiovascular research. (2020-10-13)

Tumor progression depends on the tumor microenvironment
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Niigata University identified a novel mechanism by which tumors progress. By studying the role of TNF-α and TGF-β in the formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the researchers found that both proteins together exert a robust effect on the development of CAFs. They further found that oral cancer cells show increased tumor progression in response to TGF-β protein secreted from CAFs. The findings of this study could help develop novel cancer therapies. (2020-10-01)

Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn's
A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn. The discovery has implications for wound treatment and preventing some of the aging process in skin. Researchers identified a factor in the skin of baby mice controlling hair follicle formation. When it was activated in adult mice, their skin was able to heal wounds without scarring. The reformed skin even included fur and could make goose bumps. (2020-09-29)

Discovery of cells that heal cardiac damage after infarction
Researchers at Cima and the Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain) have led an international study identifying the cardiac cells responsible for repairing the damage to this organ after infarction. These ''restorative'' cells are a subpopulation of cardiac fibroblasts that play a fundamental role in the creation of the collagen scar needed to avoid the rupture of the ventricular wall. The research also reveals the molecular mechanisms involved in the activation of these cells and the regulation of their function. (2020-09-29)

Study: Childhood chemo alters heart's caretaker cells
Why do 20% of children who receive cancer chemotherapy go on to develop heart failure later in life? UT Health San Antonio researchers led by Gregory Aune, MD, PhD, are studying this question and report a clue in a new journal article. (2020-09-29)

A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally. (2020-09-24)

Method to derive blood vessel cells from skin cells suggests ways to slow aging
Salk scientists have used skin cells called fibroblasts from young and old patients to successfully create blood vessels cells that retain their molecular markers of age. The team's approach revealed clues as to why blood vessels tend to become leaky and hardened with aging, and lets researchers identify new molecular targets to potentially slow aging in vascular cells. (2020-09-08)

A soft-hearted approach to healing
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba and Keio University have clarified the roles of matrix stiffness and mechanotransduction as well as the signaling pathways in the transformation of cardiac fibroblasts into contractile cardiomyocytes and show that soft substrates comparable to native myocardium improve the efficiency of this cardiac reprogramming. This has potential for research into biomaterials and may lead to clinical advances in regenerative treatment for heart failure. (2020-08-30)

Molecule secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts promotes anticancer drug resistance
Joint research at Kumamoto University in Japan discovered a new mechanism for anticancer drug resistance in gastric cancer. Experiments clarified that the Annexin A6 molecule contained in extracellular vesicles (EVs) is secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and taken up by gastric cancer cells, resulting in resistance to anticancer drug treatment. New drug development that targets Annexin A6 and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) may be possible. (2020-08-21)

Pulmonary fibrosis treatment shows proof of principle
A pre-clinical study led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's demonstrates that in mice the drug barasertib reverses the activation of fibroblasts that cause dangerous scar tissue to build up in the lungs of people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). (2020-08-06)

New insights into wound healing
Research from a multidisciplinary team led by Washington University may provide new insights into wound healing, scarring and how cancer spreads (2020-07-29)

Mix and match: New 3D cell culture model replicates fibrotic elements of pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer is a deadly cancer characterized by prominent fibrosis, which plays a crucial role in disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Despite various efforts, experimental models to date have generally failed to fully recapitulate the extent of fibrosis in human tissue. Now, scientists at Okayama University, Japan, have reported a new method that uses a 3D cell culture technique to generate pancreatic cancer tissues in the laboratory with any given amount of fibrosis. (2020-07-22)

Cell death in porpoises caused by environmental pollutants
Environmental pollutants threaten the health of marine mammals. This study established a novel cell-based assay using the fibroblasts of a finless porpoise stranded along the coast of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, to better understand the cytotoxicity and the impacts of environmental pollutants on the porpoise population. The results revealed that the concentrations of PCBs and DDTs which accumulated in the porpoise are likely to have an adverse effect at the cellular level. (2020-07-20)

Cardiac scar tissue: A factor which regulates its size
As recently published in the journal Cell, a collaborative group including Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D. and Samad Ahadian, Ph.D., of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI), has identified collagen V as an important factor in the scarring process and observed that large quantities of collagen V were found in cardiac injury scars. (2020-07-13)

Expansion stress enhances growth and migration of breast cancer cells
Expansion stress can have an alarming impact on breast cancer cells by creating conditions that could lead to dangerous acceleration of the disease, an interdisciplinary team of University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers has found. (2020-07-09)

How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. The study, published in the journal Cell, reveals that a protein known as type 5 collagen plays a critical role in regulating the size of scar tissue in the heart. (2020-07-03)

A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Neil Segil and Justin Ichida are whispering the secrets of a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. Their approach uses direct reprogramming to produce sensory cells known as 'hair cells,' due to their hair-like protrusions that sense sound waves. The study was published in the journal eLife. (2020-07-01)

One-time treatment generates new neurons, eliminates Parkinson's disease in mice
UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. As a result, the mice's Parkinson's disease symptoms disappear. (2020-06-24)

Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration
Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only. Emerging interests to directly reprogram a mammalian heart with minimal regenerative capacity holds a promising future in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. (2020-06-22)

Loss of lipid-regulating gene fuels prostate cancer spread
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers from the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences identified a lipid-regulating protein that conveys what the researchers describe as ''superpowers'' onto prostate cancer cells, causing them to aggressively spread. (2020-06-16)

Prodigiosin-based solution has selective activity against cancer cells
Together with colleagues from the University of Palermo, KFU employees offer a nano preparation based on biocompatible halloysite nanotubes and bacterial pigment prodigiosin; the latter is known to selectively disrupt cancer cells without damaging the healthy ones. (2020-06-12)

Researchers identify 'hot spots' for developing lymphatic vessels
The development of the lymphatic vasculature is crucially dependent on one specific protein -- the growth factor VEGF-C. Using the zebrafish model, researchers now gained new insights into how and at which spots the individual protagonists of the VEGF-C signalling pathway need to interact with each other in the embryo. The study has been published in the journal 'Nature Communications'. (2020-06-11)

Biochemical alterations revealed in patients with Lesch-Nyhan disease
An international study by the Institute of Neuroscience of the UAB (INC-UAB), Emory University and Hospital Universitario La Paz, published in the PNAS journal, shows that patients suffering from Lesch-Nyhan, a rare neurological disease, present biochemical alterations in skin cells (fibroblasts), urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Researchers have also discovered why these alterations had not been observed before: the high levels of folic acid (B9 vitamin) usually used in cell cultures reverse them. (2020-06-04)

Researchers identify secretion mechanisms for a protein necessary for maintaining healthy connective
Researchers have discovered that a defective form of the protein aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is retained in cells and induces cellular stress. This finding may provide targets for pharmacologic and therapeutic interventions in treating individuals with EDS as well as wound healing disorders and fibrosis. (2020-06-03)

Extracellular vesicles play an important role in the pathology of malaria vivax
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of malaria vivax, according to a study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and the Germans Trias i Pujol Health Science Research Institute (IGTP). The findings, published in Nature Communications, indicate that EVs from P. vivax patients communicate with spleen fibroblasts promoting the adhesion of parasite-infected red blood cells. These data provide important insights into the pathology of vivax malaria. (2020-06-02)

Cancer cells cause inflammation to protect themselves from viruses
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered how cancer cells protect themselves from viruses that are harmful to tumors but not to healthy cells. These findings could lead to improved viral treatments for the disease. (2020-06-01)

Blocking tumor signals can hinder cancer's spread
A University of Pennsylvania-led team used an inhibitor of an enzyme called p38α kinase to suppress the spread of melanoma to the lungs in a mouse model. (2020-05-28)

Rejuvenated fibroblasts can recover the ability to contract
A recent study from the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore has shown that rejuvenated fibroblasts can recover their ability to self-contract. This encouraging discovery holds great potential for applications in regenerative medicine and stem cell engineering. (2020-05-26)

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