Current Financial Crisis News and Events

Current Financial Crisis News and Events, Financial Crisis News Articles.
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Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?
Study looks at COVID-19 effects on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use, and overall well-being among low-income Black and Latino individuals who have lived with HIV for many years. (2021-02-22)

Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students
New nationwide survey data uncovers college students' current mental health challenges and needs. (2021-02-19)

UNEP synthesis of scientific assessments provides blueprint to secure humanity's future
The UN Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNEP launch ''Making Peace with Nature,'' a year-long synthesis of major UN scientific assessments. This summary underscores the level of emergency documented and reveals an intersection of common conclusions that clearly identify core policy change priorities. The new report also prescribes priority actions required of every major segment of society, from governments and the private sector to the general public, to begin making peace with Nature. (2021-02-18)

Climate change concern unaffected by pandemic, study shows
Covid-19 has not made people any less concerned about climate change - despite the pandemic disrupting and dominating many aspects of their lives, a study suggests. Over a period of 14 months - including the first three months of the Covid-19 lockdown - neither concern about climate change nor belief in the severity of the problem declined in the UK, the research found. (2021-02-18)

Deep seabed mining must benefit all humankind
As investors set their sights on the mineral resources of the deep seabed, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) is developing regulations that will govern their future exploration and possible exploitation. A new IASS Policy Brief, published in cooperation with the Federal Environment Agency (UBA), presents three recommendations to ensure that future deep seabed mining would be to the common benefit all humankind, as required by international law. (2021-02-18)

The effect of natural disasters on criminal--and charitable--activity in the USA
While media has popularized a notion of widespread looting and chaos in the wake of major disasters, the researchers found that communities impacted by disasters actually experience a decrease in crime. Their article also found a marked increase in philanthropic activity amongst people that live nearby disaster areas but weren't directly affected by the disaster. (2021-02-16)

Study sheds light on how people cope with health challenges and medical debt
A recent qualitative study sheds light on how people cope with health and financial challenges, highlighting the important role that communication plays in these coping strategies. (2021-02-16)

Innovation predicts higher profits and stock returns
A large-scale study of the link between innovation and financial performance in Australian companies has found more innovative companies post higher future profits and stock returns. (2021-02-16)

After COVID-19 hit, federal financial aid applications dropped sharply among first-year students
After the COVID-19 crisis hit last March, federal student aid applications among potential college freshmen in California dropped 14 percent between mid-March and mid-August, relative to prior years. While there were also initial declines in applications among current undergraduates and graduate students, these quickly recovered and ended 8 percent higher relative to prior years. (2021-02-10)

Digital providers come to the fore to support global mental health during pandemic
Research published today shows how digital providers are coming together to support the mental health needs of millions of users unable to access traditional services during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first time ever, digital providers and experts from over 20 countries have gathered a staggering number of insights about mental health during the pandemic from potentially upwards of 50 million users worldwide. (2021-02-10)

Coal and COVID-19: How the pandemic is accelerating the end of fossil power generation
COVID-19 has not only caused a temporary drop in global CO2 emissions, it has also reduced the share of power generated by burning coal - a trend that could in fact outlast the pandemic. This is the key result of a new study by a team of economists based in Potsdam and Berlin that looked at COVID-19's impact on the energy system and demand for electricity. (2021-02-08)

Death by suicide? Drug overdoses muddy waters for investigators, amplify mental health crisis
A new West Virginia University-led injury mortality study combines most drug overdose deaths with all suicides into an expanded self-injury category. Exposing a mental health crisis that has unraveled across the United States over the past two decades, study data have direct implications for suicide prevention efforts. (2021-02-08)

Pandemic caused 'staggering' economic, human impact in developing counties, research says
The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic last year led to a devastating loss of jobs and income across the global south, threatening hundreds of millions of people with hunger and lost savings and raising an array of risks for children, according to new research co-authored at the University of California, Berkeley. (2021-02-05)

Gap between the 'haves' and 'have nots' widened by the COVID pandemic, an IU study found
A new study by Indiana University found women, younger individuals, those with lower levels of formal education, and people of color are being hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-05)

Helping consumers save more by bursting their bubble of financial responsibility
When people perceive that their past financial behaviors have fallen short of their desired standard, they start to save more to restore perceptions of financial responsibility. (2021-02-04)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

The new normal: How businesses in China are coping with the Covid-19 pandemic
The effect of the Covid-19 pandemic can be clearly felt in the marketplace. This has been an unprecedented existential crisis for individuals and organizations alike across the globe. To ensure communities and corporations emerge unscathed, leaders need to effectively respond to these trying times. The latest edition of the Frontiers of Business Research in China offers six practical perspectives that can help business leaders and policy-makers design policy interventions for real and tangible impact. (2021-02-02)

'COVID effect' leads to fewer heart surgeries, more patient deaths
The most deadly global health crisis in a century has resulted in a substantial decline in overall heart surgery volume and an unexplained increase in deaths after coronary artery bypass grafting. (2021-01-30)

COVID unemployment assistance puts food on the table: BU study
Another wave of COVID-19 is putting millions out of work, while tens of millions more remain unemployed, and Congress debates aid. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study shows that unemployment help directly translates to people being able to put food on the table. (2021-01-29)

COVID-19 pandemic led to decreased school meal access for children in need across Maryland
School closures during COVID-19 have decreased access to school meals, which is likely to increase the risk for food insecurity among children in Maryland, according to a new report issued by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). (2021-01-29)

Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence - the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress - may be more vital to a business' survival than previously thought. (2021-01-28)

New psychological model predicts who panic-buys during times of crisis
Drawing on animal-foraging theory, a new model predicts psychological factors that may lead to panic buying during times of crisis. The model is largely supported by real-world data from the COVID-19 pandemic. Richard Bentall of the University of Sheffield, England, and colleagues presented these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 27. (2021-01-28)

Legal cannabis stores linked to fewer opioid deaths in the United States
Access to legal cannabis stores is associated with a reduction in opioid related deaths in the United States, particularly those linked to synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2021-01-27)

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found. Researchers examining data from the U.K. found that at companies with more financial transparency, workers felt more secure in their jobs, more committed to their employers and - most significantly - said they had better relationships with their managers. (2021-01-25)

Incentivizing vaccine adherence: could it be the key to achieving herd immunity?
To achieve success, experts estimate that at least 70 to 90 percent of the population must be inoculated with a COVID-19 vaccine to achieve herd immunity, but how can we ensure folks will voluntarily receive a vaccine? An examination of scientific evidence on incentivizing vaccine adherence found that modest financial incentives resulted in as much as a 7-fold increase in adherence compared to no incentives. (2021-01-20)

Online courses reinforce inequalities
With the global student community taking online courses, a study (UNIGE) reveals that online courses deepen inequalities between gifted and less gifted students by 5%. The results of the study, which was based on data collected in 2016-2017 prior to the anti-Covid lockdown initiatives. They indicate that this learning gap between different student profiles is mainly due to their behaviour and motivation. (2021-01-19)

A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, news research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from the ambient air and sequester it safely underground. (2021-01-14)

Saver or spender? People are not as financially responsible as they may think, study shows
According to new research from the University of Notre Dame, people think they are more financially responsible than they actually are. (2021-01-13)

New insights into pancreatitis
Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases around the world. Associated with a considerable risk of morbidity and even death in patients who suffer a severe form of the disease, to date there is no specific treatment for it. Now international AP experts have published a roadmap in the journal Gut (BMJ) pinpointing the two most significant thresholds in the disease that could serve as a starting point for targeting treatment strategies for this extremely painful condition. (2021-01-13)

Study finds NRA stakeholders conflicted in wake of shootings
A recent study finds that, in the wake of a mass shooting, National Rifle Association (NRA) employees, donors and volunteers had extremely mixed emotions about the organization - reporting higher levels of both positive and negative feelings about the NRA, as compared to people with no NRA affiliation. (2021-01-12)

Research finds increased trust in government and science amid pandemic
New Curtin University research has found a dramatic increase in people's trust in government in Australia and New Zealand as a result of the COVID pandemic. (2021-01-08)

NYUAD study informs research of child development and learning in conflict-affected areas
To provide effective aid to children who live in areas of conflict it is necessary to understand precisely how they have been impacted by the crises around them. One area of importance is the effect of conflict and trauma on a child's development and education. Global TIES for Children researchers present a review of opportunities and challenges they have encountered in designing and conducting rigorous research that advances our understanding of this effect (2021-01-07)

Estonian-led international network publishes first study of growing influence of social media
The Global Digital Human Rights Network has published a study on the growing role of social media in the processing of information and the fight against misinformation related to COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight -- or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists, led by Dr. Yuli Shan and Professor Klaus Hubacek, University of Groningen, has quantified how different recovery scenarios may affect global emissions and climate change. (2020-12-22)

Recommendations for the overdose epidemic in the COVID-19 pandemic
A new report from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health offers recommendations aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers to address the opioid epidemic during the pandemic. (2020-12-21)

Will we still need Covid-19 volunteers in the new year?
During the first national lockdown of the Covid-19 pandemic earlier this year, and subsequent social restrictions, thousands of volunteers provided a vital lifeline for many vulnerable people throughout an unprecedented time of anxiety and social restrictions. (2020-12-18)

Cannabis could reduce fentanyl use, reduce overdose risk: Study
New research suggests that cannabis use by people in care for opioid addiction might improve their treatment outcomes and reduce their risk of being exposed to fentanyl in the contaminated unregulated drug supply. (2020-12-18)

Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis
During the corona crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health. These are the results of a study carried out by psychologists from the Universities of Münster and Bielefeld. The study has been published in the ''Journal of Research in Personality''. (2020-12-17)

UBC study highlights need for more effective staffing in care homes
Even the best-managed long-term care homes will need to step up to get through the second wave of the pandemic (2020-12-17)

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