Current Fingerprint News and Events

Current Fingerprint News and Events, Fingerprint News Articles.
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Researchers find evidence of protein folding at site of intracellular droplets
Researchers at the University of Notre Dame found that elevated concentrations of proteins within the droplets triggered a folding event, increasing the potential for protein aggregation -- or misfolding -- which has been linked to neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (2021-02-19)

Routine blood tests could be key to stopping the silent killer of liver disease
New research has shown that results of blood tests routinely performed by GPs everywhere contain a hidden fingerprint that can identify people silently developing potentially fatal liver cirrhosis. The researchers have developed an algorithm to detect this fingerprint that could be freely installed on any clinical computer, making this a low-cost way for GPs to carry out large scale screening using patient data they already hold. (2021-02-11)

Wet and wild: There's lots of water in the world's most explosive volcano
Conditions inside the Shiveluch volcano include roughly 10%-14% water by weight (wt%), according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. Most volcanoes have less than 1% water. For subduction zone volcanoes, the average is usually 4%, rarely exceeding 8 wt%, which is considered superhydrous. (2021-01-22)

Researcher uses machine learning to demonstrate that DNA impacts cancer risk
University of Calgary researcher uses machine learning to demonstrate that DNA impacts cancer risk. Team identifies seven DNA fingerprints or patterns that define cancer risk. One of the seven germlines offers protection from developing cancer, and the other six germlines present a greater risk for cancer. It is the first time scientists have described these highly-specialized biological patterns applicable to cancer risk. Discovery refines the long-held views of why people get cancer. (2020-12-22)

How water helps the substrate into the enzyme
Researchers from Bochum and Berkeley have investigated why cages can increase the catalytic activity of enclosed molecules. Using terahertz spectroscopy and complex computer simulations, they showed that water encapsulated in a tiny cage has special properties - that are structurally and dynamically distinct from any known phase of water. The water forms a droplet inside the cage that facilitates the encapsulation of a host molecule, i.e. to access the catalytic centre. (2020-12-15)

Raman holography
Scientists from ICFO and University Rovira i Virgili report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image. (2020-11-30)

Social bacteria build shelters using the physics of fingerprints
When starvation threatens, forest-dwelling Myxococcus xanthus bacteria work collectively to form fruiting bodies, spongy mushroom-like growths that promote survival. Princeton researchers have identified how these bacteria harness the same physical laws that lead to the whorls of a fingerprint to build the structures layer by layer. (2020-11-23)

Identifying compound classes through machine learning
Bioinformaticians at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany together with colleagues from Finland and the USA, have now developed a unique method with which all metabolites in a sample can be taken into account, thus considerably increasing the knowledge gained from examining such molecules. The team reports on its successful research in the scientific journal Nature Biotechnology. (2020-11-23)

Surrey helps to produce the world's first neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions
An international team of scientists have unveiled the world's first production of a purified beam of neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions. (2020-11-10)

Seven different 'disease forms' identified in mild COVID-19
In a study a team of MedUni Vienna scientists led by immunologist Winfried F. Pickl and allergologist Rudolf Valenta showed that there are seven ''forms of disease'' in COVID-19 with mild disease course and that the disease leaves behind significant changes in the immune system, even after 10 weeks. These findings could play a significant role in the treatment of patients and in the development of a potent vaccine. (2020-11-02)

Microbial strains show individualized patterns of stability in the developing infant gut
Microbial strain stability studies of human infants and children, ages shortly after birth (about 6 months) to 6 years, show individualized patterns of microbial strain specificity as the infant gut microbiomes developed. (2020-10-28)

A flash of light to identify tumors: the results of the VIBRA project of the Politecnico di Milano
The VIBRA project, ''Very fast Imaging by Broadband coherent Raman'', has just ended at the Politecnico di Milano. Funded by the prestigious European Research Council of the European Community and lasted 5 years (2015-2020), it led to the development of a new revolutionary optical microscope in the biological and biomedical fields. (2020-10-16)

Shared protein fingerprint could simplify treatment of common inherited heart disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists discovered that many different genetic mutations result in surprisingly similar changes to heart muscle proteins in patients with the most severe manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (2020-09-22)

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors
An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role. (2020-07-30)

Machine learning system can detect foreign social media influence campaigns using content alone
Researchers have developed an automated machine learning system they say can detect social media posts involved in coordinated political influence campaigns -- such as Russia's alleged efforts to sway the results of the 2016 elections in the United States -- regardless of platform and based only on the content of the posts. (2020-07-22)

Droplet biosensing method opens the door for faster identification of COVID-19
In Cheng and Zhou's method, all of the contents of a sampling droplet can be detected, and there is no extraction or other tedious procedures. (2020-07-21)

Vision scientists discover why people literally don't see eye to eye
We humans may not always see eye to eye on politics, religion, sports and other matters of debate. And now it turns out we also cannot agree on the location and size of objects in our physical surroundings, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2020-07-14)

FSU News: MagLab geochemists solve mystery of Earth's vanishing crust
A team of geochemists based at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has found new evidence that Earth has been consistently churning out crust since its formation 4.5 billion years ago and that some crust is made of ancient, resurfaced chunks. (2020-06-26)

Urine test reveals quality of your diet -- and whether it's the best fit for your body
Scientists have completed large-scale tests on a new type of five-minute urine test that measures the health of a person's diet, and produces an individual's unique urine 'fingerprint'. (2020-06-22)

Proteins expressed by viruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti Mosquito
The female Aedes aegypti mosquito is a vector of several arthropodborne viruses, such as Mayaro, Dengue, Chikungunya, Yellow Fever, and Zika. The objective of the present study was to search for the regularities of the proteins expressed by these five viruses, at residues level, and obtain a ''bioinformatic fingerprint'' to select them. (2020-06-19)

High-security identification that cannot be counterfeited
Researchers from University of Tsukuba have used the principles that underpin the whispering-gallery effect to create an unbeatable anti-counterfeiting system. The researchers' system is a microchip consisting of two-step authentication. Step 1 is the visible pattern on the chip. Step 2 is the non-forgeable color fingerprint of the chip. These microchips will be useful for high-security authentication. (2020-05-26)

Study: How to identify patients most at risk from COVID-19 through nanotechnology
What if doctors could not only diagnose a COVID-19 infection but identify which patients are at the greatest risk of death before any major complications arise? One Michigan State University scientist believes nanotechnology may be the answer. (2020-05-18)

Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. The paper, 'New Insights into Paleoseismic Age Models on the Northern San Andreas Fault: Charcoal In-built ages and Updated Earthquake Correlations,' was recently published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-05-14)

First epigenetic study in 3D human cancer cells
The researcher Manel Esteller performs the first massive epigenetic characterization in organoids or 3D cancer cultures and makes the data available to the research community to facilitate new findings on tumor development and progression. (2020-05-13)

Cancer research breakthrough as DNA behavior is uncovered in 3D models
Scientists have used 3D models to break down the DNA behavior of cancer cells, in a breakthrough new study which could revolutionize treatment for the disease. (2020-05-10)

Individualized mosaics of microbial strains transfer from the maternal to the infant gut
Researchers have used a microbiome 'fingerprint' method to report that an individualized mosaic of microbial strains is transmitted to the infant gut microbiome from a mother giving birth through vaginal delivery. They detailed this transmission by analyzing existing metagenomic databases of fecal samples from mother-infant pairs, as well as analyzing mouse dam and pup transmission in a germ-free, or gnotobiotic, mouse model, where the dams were inoculated with human fecal microbes. (2020-05-08)

Chocolate 'fingerprints' could confirm label claims
The flavor and aroma of a fine chocolate emerge from its ecology, in addition to its processing. But can you be certain that the bar you bought is really from the exotic locale stated on the wrapper? Now, researchers are presenting a method for determining where a particular chocolate was produced by looking at its chemical 'fingerprint.' The researchers are presenting their results through the American Chemical Society (ACS) SciMeetings online platform. (2020-04-20)

Atomic fingerprint identifies emission sources of uranium
Depending on whether uranium is released by the civil nuclear industry or as fallout from nuclear weapon tests, the ratio of the two anthropogenic, i.e. man-made, uranium isotopes 233U and 236U varies. These results were lately found by an international team at the University of Vienna and provides a promising new ''fingerprint'' for the identification of radioactive emission sources. As a consequence, it is also an excellent environmental tracer for ocean currents. (2020-03-09)

'Tickling' an atom to investigate the behavior of materials
Scientists and engineers working at the frontier of nanotechnology face huge challenges. When the position of a single atom in a material may change the fundamental properties of that material, scientists need something in their toolbox to measure how that atom will behave. (2020-03-05)

Gold nanoparticles detect signals from cancer cells
A novel blood test that uses gold nanoparticles to detect cancer has also been shown to identify signals released by cancer cells. The technology could enable earlier diagnosis and better treatment. (2020-02-26)

Living cell imaging technique sheds light on molecular view of obesity
Researchers have developed novel probes to track cellular events that can lead to obesity. These probes will help to improve techniques to efficiently test the viability of new drugs to treat obesity and obesity-related conditions. (2020-02-24)

Sussex researchers combine lasers and terahertz waves in camera that sees 'unseen' detail
A team of physicists at the University of Sussex has successfully developed the first nonlinear camera capable of capturing high-resolution images of the interior of solid objects using terahertz (THz) radiation. (2020-02-18)

Chemists use mass spectrometry tools to determine age of fingerprints
Chemists at Iowa State University may have solved a puzzle of forensic science: How do you determine the age of a fingerprint? The chemists used mass spectrometry tools to analyze fingerprints and found clues in the fatty oils within the prints. More study is needed, but they believe they're on the path to developing a fingerprint-aging technique that could potentially tie a suspect to a crime scene. (2020-02-18)

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur. (2020-02-12)

There's a twist in the story of volcanism & mass extinctions, say CCNY researchers
An emerging scientific consensus is that gases -- in particular carbon gases -- released by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago contributed to some of Earth's greatest mass extinctions. But new research at The City College of New York suggests that that's not the entire story. (2020-02-10)

Experimental fingerprint test can distinguish between those who have taken or handled cocaine
An experimental fingerprint detection approach can identify traces of cocaine on human skin, even after someone has washed their hands -- and the test is also smart enough to tell whether an individual has actually consumed the class A drug, or simply handled it. (2020-02-06)

OU study finds the fingerprint of paddy rice in atmospheric methane concentration dynamics
A University of Oklahoma-led study shows that paddy rice (both area and plant growth) is significantly related to the spatial-temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration in monsoon Asia, where 87% of paddy rice fields are situated in the world. (2020-02-03)

Residues in fingerprints hold clues to their age
Police have long relied on the unique whorls, loops or arches encoded in fingerprints to identify suspects. However, they have no way to tell how long ago those prints were left behind -- information that could be crucial to a case. A preliminary new study in ACS' Analytical Chemistry suggests that could change. Researchers report that they could link compounds contained in fingerprints with their age.    (2020-01-22)

The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you
Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy. (2020-01-17)

Edible 'security tag' to protect drugs from counterfeit
Purdue University researchers are aiming to stump drug counterfeiters with an edible 'security tag' embedded into medicine. To imitate the drug, a counterfeiter would have to uncrack a complicated puzzle of patterns not fully visible to the naked eye. (2020-01-16)

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