Current Firefighters News and Events

Current Firefighters News and Events, Firefighters News Articles.
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Rescuers at risk: emergency personnel face trauma and post traumatic stress symptoms
Researchers at the University of Bern's Hospital of Psychiatry have for the first time, demonstrated varying levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in emergency personnel and rescue workers, with emergency department and psychiatry department staff demonstrating the highest levels of PTSS, suicidal thoughts and dysfunctional coping strategies. The study highlights the urgent need for job-specific training to improve emergency workers' quality of life and ability to cope with work-related trauma. (2021-01-19)

New clues help explain why PFAS chemicals resist remediation
Chemicals used in firefighting foam and other products can last for decades in the environment, resisting efforts to remove them. New research suggest why that happens and new avenues for remediation. (2021-01-19)

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili, Ph.D., George Mason University challenges the conventional, reactionary paradigm of safety-risk management (2020-12-17)

Study: Oregon's Western Cascades watershed to experience larger, more frequent fires
Projected changes in temperature and relative humidity are expected to lead to longer fire seasons and more severe fire weather in Oregon's Western Cascade mountains, which in turn will result in larger, more frequent fires. (2020-12-14)

Trial targets deadly lung cancer
With more than 650 Australians diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma last year, Flinders University is leading new research to discover alternatives to chemotherapy and even prevent deaths by early detection in future. One novel approach, using natural therapeutic benefits of curcumin, a key component of the spice turmeric, will be put to the test in a clinical trial in 2021 as part of world-leading research at Flinders University. (2020-10-30)

Study shows COVID-19 risk to firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City
Firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City were 15 times more likely to be infected during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the general public, according to a study published in ERJ Open Research. (2020-10-29)

World's largest experiment shows shack fires move with devastating speed
An experiment by the Fire Engineering Research Unit at Stellenbosch University, the Western Cape Disaster Management, Fire & Rescue Services and the Breede Valley Municipality Fire Department, showed that a fire spreading through an informal settlement can destroy twenty shacks (informal houses) in five minutes. The work on how to reduce the impact of such fires is in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh and funded by the UK-based Global Challenges Research Fund (2020-10-08)

Reactions to perceived broken promises lead to workplace stress for police officers
Negative feelings resulting from perceived broken promises from employers within UK police forces are a major cause of workplace stress, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2020-10-05)

MTU engineers build three new open-source tools for COVID-19
A 3D printer that can take the heat, breathing tech to keep firefighters safe and a ventilator design printed for less than $170. Large groups of makers, engineers, and medical professionals collaborate to make open-source solutions that can be reproduced and assembled locally worldwide. (2020-09-22)

Stanford researchers combine CAT scans and advanced computing to fight wildfires
Engineers at Stanford have used X-ray CT scans, more common in hospital labs, to study how wood catches fire. They've now turned that knowledge into a computer simulation to predict where fires will strike and spread. (2020-09-22)

How dangerous are burning electric cars?
What happens if an electric car burns in a road tunnel or an underground car park? In the Hagerbach test tunnel in Switzerland, Empa researchers and tunnel safety expert Lars Derek Mellert set fire to battery cells of electric cars, analyzed the distribution of soot and smoke gases and the chemical residues in the extinguishing water. (2020-09-01)

Firefighters exposed to more potentially harmful chemicals than previously thought
The on-duty firefighters in the Kansas City, Missouri, area experienced higher exposures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, which are a family of chemicals that are known to have the potential to cause cancer. (2020-08-20)

UCalgary research delivers new insights into how skin can regenerate after severe burns
New research led by Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, PhD, has made an exciting leap forward in understanding how skin heals, which could lead to drug treatments to vastly improve wound healing. The study, published in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, was co-led by Dr. Sepideh Abbasi, PhD, Sarthak Sinha, MD/PhD candidate and Dr. Elodie Labit, PhD, postdoctoral fellow. (2020-08-19)

NASA's Aqua Satellite shows extent of Apple Fire's burn scar
On Aug. 9, 2020 NASA's Aqua satellite imaged the Apple Fire near Big Bear Lake in California using its false-color bands in order to be able to distinguish burn scars from the surrounding area more easily. (2020-08-10)

Epidemic model shows how COVID-19 could spread through firefighting camps
To support fire agencies as they continue their mission-critical work, a team that includes Colorado State University experts has developed an epidemiological modeling exercise for the USDA Forest Service and other fire managers that demonstrates potential risks and various scenarios COVID-19 could pose for the fire management community. Their model is published in the journal Fire. (2020-08-04)

How climate change impacts prescribed burning days
Climate change in eastern Australia will shift when hazard reduction burning occurs but for most areas the number of suitable days remains unchanged. In some places, there will even be increases. Queensland is the only exception where the window for hazard reduction burning declines. However, climate change also increases the frequency and intensity of inversion layers, meaning it is more likely atmospheric conditions will concentrate smoke and particulate matter close to the ground. (2020-07-28)

COVID-19 medical leave among EMS responders, firefighters in New York
The use of medical leave among emergency medical service responders and firefighters in New York during the COVID-19 pandemic is compared with earlier periods. (2020-07-24)

Gear treated with 'forever chemicals' poses risk to firefighters
Graham Peaslee's team tested more than 30 samples of used and unused PPE from six specialty textile manufacturers in the United States and found them to be treated extensively with PFAS or constructed with fluoropolymers, a type of PFAS used to make textiles oil and water resistant. (2020-06-23)

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captures 63 mile smoke trail from bush fire
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of the Bush Fire on June 22, 2020 showing clouds of smoke pouring off the Bush Fire that is plaguing Arizona. (2020-06-23)

Limit fire service instructors' exposures per month to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease
New research published in Experimental Physiology suggests that fire service instructors are at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases due to higher levels of inflammation in their blood, and so their exposure should be limited to nine exposures per month. (2020-05-26)

Millions of US workers at risk of infections on the job
A University of Washington researcher calculates that 14.4 million workers face exposure to infection once a week and 26.7 million at least once a month in the workplace, pointing to an important population needing protection as the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, continues to break out across the US. (2020-04-29)

Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
A new way to synthesize polymers, called hydrothermal synthesis, can be used to produce important high-performance materials in a way which is much better for the environment. Dangerous toxins which usually have to be used to produce theses polymers can be substituted by water. (2020-04-21)

Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals
San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Silent Spring Institute. The study represents one of the first published results from the Women Firefighter Biomonitoring Collaborative, a long-term investigation into breast cancer risks faced by women firefighters. (2020-02-26)

Comparing PFAS exposures in female firefighters and office workers
Firefighters have higher rates of some cancers than the general population, which might not be surprising given the many potential carcinogens they encounter while battling blazes. However, previous studies of chemical exposures in this occupation have focused almost exclusively on men. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have compared poly- and perfluorinated substances (PFAS) in the serum of female firefighters and female office workers, finding higher levels of three compounds in the firefighters. (2020-02-26)

Training the mind in resilience
Two new studies from University of Miami researchers found that offering mindfulness training in high-demand settings bolsters attention and resilience. (2020-02-19)

Sound of music: How melodic alarms could reduce morning grogginess
New research suggests melodic alarms could improve alertness, with harsh alarm tones linked to increased levels of morning grogginess. (2020-02-03)

Human-sparked fires smaller, less intense but more frequent with longer seasons
Fires started by people have steadily increased in recent decades, sparking a major shift in U.S. wildfire norms, according to a new CU Boulder-led study. The research found human-caused wildfires are more frequent, smaller, less hot and occur over longer seasons than fires started by lightning. (2020-01-21)

McMaster chemists find new way to break down old tires into material for new ones
A team of chemists at McMaster University has discovered an innovative way to break down and dissolve the rubber used in automobile tires, a process which could lead to new recycling methods that have so far proven to be expensive, difficult and largely inefficient. (2020-01-13)

Developed a band-aid-like sensor to detect human body conditions in real-time
DGIST announced that Professor Hyuk-Jun Kwon in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed a 'patch-based health diagnosis sensor system' that is easily attached to skin with Professor Sunkook Kim's research team at Sungkyunkwan University. This sensor is attached to skin as if attaching band-aid and collects various health information in real-time by monitoring biosignals and certain movements, drawing huge expectations for diverse applications. (2020-01-08)

Research will help land managers take risk-analysis approach to new wildfire reality
New digital tools will enable land managers to better adapt to the new reality of large wildfires through analytics that guide planning and suppression across jurisdictional boundaries that fires typically don't adhere to. (2020-01-08)

Distress tolerance plays role in alcohol use and abuse among firefighters
A newly published report from a University of Houston psychology professor finds that firefighters who struggle with PTSD symptoms, and who think they cannot handle negative emotions, are likely to drink and use alcohol it to cope with negative emotions. (2019-12-03)

Mental health information in rural areas is best delivered face-to-face, study shows
Mental health is a concern in rural areas, as farmers cope with stress and uncertainty due to economic and environmental conditions. Often, there are no mental health providers in the local community. Public health programs can help, but what are the best ways to reach farm populations with those programs? That's the topic of a new study conducted by a University of Illinois researcher. (2019-12-02)

Firefighters can ease one another's job stress, but loving spouses may increase it
Strong same-sex friendships among male firefighters can help cut down on their stress -- but loving relationships with their wives may increase anxiety for those who constantly face danger, according to a Baylor University study. (2019-11-13)

Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats. (2019-10-10)

'Fire inversions' lock smoke in valleys
There's an atmospheric feedback loop, says University of Utah atmospheric scientist Adam Kochanski, that can lock smoke in valleys in much the same way that temperature inversions lock the smog and gunk in the Salt Lake Valley each winter. But understanding this loop, Kochanski says, can help scientists predict how smoke will impact air quality in valleys, hopefully helping both residents and firefighters alike. (2019-09-12)

Is exposure to world trade center disaster associated with cardiovascular disease risk for NY firefighters
A study of nearly 9,800 Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) male firefighters suggests an association between greater exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and long-term cardiovascular disease risk, while the results of other studies have been mixed. (2019-09-06)

9/11 World Trade Center exposure linked to heart disease among NYC firefighters
A study of New York City firefighters finds that exposure to 9/11 World Trade Center (WTC) dust is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, and the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) report in JAMA Network Open that those who arrived first at the WTC site have a 44% increased risk of CVD compared to those who arrived later. (2019-09-06)

Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals may guard against lung damage in 9/11 first responders
The presence of chemicals made as the body breaks down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates can predict whether Sept. 11, 2001 first responders exposed to toxic dust at the World Trade Center site subsequently develop lung disease, a new study finds. (2019-09-03)

Police less proactive after negative public scrutiny, study says
Public safety officers know that their profession could draw them into the line of fire at any moment, as it did recently for six officers wounded in a shooting standoff in Philadelphia. (2019-08-19)

Recognizing kidney injury due to burns is improved by artificial intelligence
Many burn victims suffer acute kidney injury, but early recognition of the condition can be challenging. Now an Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning model developed at UC Davis Health and reported in a new study can predict acute kidney injury quicker and more accurately than ever. (2019-07-12)

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