Current Fitness News and Events

Current Fitness News and Events, Fitness News Articles.
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Study: Preschoolers with higher cardiorespiratory fitness do better on cognitive tests
Researchers report that 4-6-year-old children who walk further than their peers during a timed test - a method used to estimate cardiorespiratory health - also do better on cognitive tests and other measures of brain function. Published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, the study suggests that the link between cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive health is evident even earlier in life than previously appreciated. (2021-02-18)

Timing of physical activity linked to fitness levels, CV risk for men with type 2 diabetes
Research published in Diabetes Care by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Joslin Diabetes Center investigators, along with collaborators, reports a correlation between the timing of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and cardiovascular fitness and health risks for individuals who have type 2 diabetes and obesity or overweight. (2021-02-17)

Evolution's game of rock-paper-scissors
A group of scientists at Lehigh University led by Gregory Lang, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, has recently provided empirical evidence that evolution can be nontransitive. Lang and his team identify a nontransitive evolutionary sequence through a 1,000-generation yeast evolution experiment. In the experiment, an evolved clone outcompetes a recent ancestor but loses in direct competition with a distant ancestor. (2021-02-16)

Drop the stress
Under stress conditions, cells switch quickly from the normal to the crisis mode to prevent themselves from being damaged. This so-called heat shock response is associated with a rapid downregulation of gene activity to release capacities to cope with the threat. Researchers at the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg have now discovered how exactly a stress-induced molecular droplet formation of the transcription regulator NELF downregulates transcription to promote cell survival upon stress. (2021-02-05)

Exercise caution after working out in virtual reality
Virtual 'exergaming' has become a popular way to exercise - especially among younger people - since the release of virtual reality (VR) fitness games on consoles such as Nintendo and Playstation. But while VR is undoubtedly raising fitness games to a whole new level, researchers at the University of South Australia are cautioning players about the potential side effects of VR, particularly in the first hour after playing. (2021-02-04)

Blink! The link between aerobic fitness and cognition
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found evidence that spontaneous eye blink activity, which reflects activity in the dopaminergic system, explains the connection between fitness and cognitive function. This is the first study to indicate that dopamine has an essential role in linking aerobic fitness and cognition. These findings open the door to new research regarding the mechanisms by which exercise improves brain function, and may lead to novel fitness strategies for enhancing cognition. (2021-02-03)

Lactobacillus manipulates bile acids to create favorable gut environment
Probiotic Lactobacillus bacteria use enzymes situationally to manipulate bile acids and promote their own survival in the gut. (2021-02-01)

Feral colonies provide clues for enhancing honey bee tolerance to pathogens
Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that enable some feral honey bee colonies to tolerate pathogens and survive the winter in the absence of beekeeping management may help lead to breeding stocks that would enhance survival of managed colonies, according to a study led by researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. (2021-01-21)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

Low fitness linked to higher psoriasis risk later in life
In a major register-based study, scientists at University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis. For the male recruits to compulsory military training who were rated as the least fit, the risk of developing psoriasis later was 35 percent higher than for the fittest. (2021-01-12)

Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Researchers publishing December 17, 2020 in the journal Current Biology found that red squirrels in the Yukon have a greater chance of survival when living near neighbors. These fitness benefits depended on familiarity, or how long the same squirrels lived next to each other. These benefits were more pronounced in older squirrels, whom the data suggested could sharply offset the effects of aging by maintaining all of their neighbors from one year to the next. (2020-12-17)

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria. (2020-12-17)

Exercise for low back pain beneficial but no one agrees on why
A new UNSW evidence review has found there is still no consensus between researchers about why exercise works for low back pain patients - despite decades of studies on the topic. (2020-12-16)

Participation in competitive sport in adolescence brings midlife health benefits to women
Females who participate in competitive sport during adolescence have better fitness at midlife than do females with no competitive sport background in adolescence, reveals a study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä. (2020-12-07)

Natural selection plays major role in an organism's capacity to evolve and adapt
It's widely assumed within the evolutionary biology field that weak selection provides an advantage to an organism's ability to evolve. But new research, published in the journal Science, may offer the first experimental proof that strong selection pressure enhances an organism's evolvability, by boosting robustness. (2020-12-03)

New theory of root competition reveals rules governing growth
In the presence of competitors, plants overproduce roots to snatch up nearby resources but avoid foraging for nutrients near their neighbors, according to a new study, which provides a new theoretical foundation for understanding the rules that govern competitive root behavior. (2020-12-03)

Tackling metabolic complexity
CRISPRi screens reveal sources of metabolic robustness in E. coli. (2020-11-24)

Inclusion is key for all to thrive throughout life, report says
When it comes to optimizing 'longevity fitness' through attention to social, health, and wealth aspects of life, many Americans face intractable inequities based on the color of their skin, where they live, their sex, and who they love. The COVID-19 pandemic has further demonstrated the additional impacts affecting these demographics through the increased number of cases and mortality rates. (2020-11-19)

Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals. (2020-11-18)

Low fitness linked to higher depression and anxiety risk
People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in BMC Medicine. (2020-11-10)

Higher fitness levels linked to lower AFib risk in male, African American veterans
Higher fitness levels reduced the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm, known as atrial fibrillation or AFib, by 30% to 50% in a study of male, African American veterans. Although only male, African American veterans were included in the study, researchers note the results suggest physical activity may reduce the risk of developing AFib among all adults. (2020-11-09)

USask researchers find face masks don't hinder breathing during exercise
A new University of Saskatchewan (USask) study has found that exercise performance and blood and muscle oxygen levels are not affected for healthy individuals wearing a face mask during strenuous workouts. (2020-11-05)

Buffalo fly faces Dengue nemesis
Australian beef cattle researchers trial the use of insect-infecting bacterium Wolbachia to tackle buffalo fly, a major blood-sucking pest that costs the industry $100 million a year in treatments and lost production. (2020-11-03)

Model of multicellular evolution overturns classic theory
Cells can evolve specialised functions under a much broader range of conditions than previously thought, according to a study published today in eLife. (2020-11-03)

Early results from DETECT study suggest fitness trackers can predict COVID-19 infections
Examining data from the first six weeks of their landmark DETECT study, a team of scientists from the Scripps Research Translational Institute sees encouraging signs that wearable fitness devices can improve public health efforts to control COVID-19. (2020-10-29)

Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. A study led by the University of Zurich has now shown how this genetic predisposition contributes to the development of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis in combination with environmental factors. The decisive factor is the shaping of a repertoire of immune cells which - although they are effective in fighting off pathogens such as Epstein-Barr virus - also attack brain tissue. (2020-10-22)

Exercise and nutrition regimen benefits physical, cognitive health
Researchers studied the effects of a 12-week exercise regimen on 148 active-duty Air Force airmen, half of whom also received a twice-daily nutrient beverage that included protein; the omega-3 fatty acid, DHA; lutein; phospholipids; vitamin D; B vitamins and other micronutrients; along with a muscle-promoting compound known as HMB. Both groups improved in physical and cognitive function, with added gains among those who regularly consumed the nutritional beverage, the team reports. (2020-10-19)

Improved mental and physical condition is directly linked to nutrition, study shows
New research demonstrates that the right nutrition is directly linked to physical and cognitive performance in active duty men and women in the US Air Force. The research subjects from the US Air Force, who consumed a specialized nutrition drink with key nutrients, showed an 11% improvement in working memory, resulting in better information processing, problem-solving and multitasking skills. When nutrition was combined with an exercise regimen, study participants showed statistically significant improvements in 80% of key fitness and cognition metrics measured. (2020-10-19)

Explaining teamwork in male lions
Biologists from the Wildlife Institute of India and the University of Minnesota demonstrated the hows and whys of cooperation among male lions. (2020-10-16)

High intensity training best for older people
Five years of high-intensity interval training increased quality of life, improved fitness and very well might have extended the lives of participants in the Generation 100 study. (2020-10-08)

Has COVID-19 knocked us onto our backsides?
A group of Kent State University researchers sought to examine the impact of pandemic-related changes upon physical activity and sedentary behavior, specifically sitting, across the university population. (2020-10-05)

Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, suggests that these droplets are an important but underexplored feature in plants, with profound implications for insects in agricultural and natural ecosystems. (2020-09-29)

How to better understand what makes a virus win during transmission?
The framework, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, was applied on transmission data of the influenza virus, and offers to be a new tool for anticipating the consequences of microbial diversity and optimizing disease control measures. (2020-09-25)

Y chromosomes of Neandertals and Denisovans now sequenced
An international research team led by Martin Petr and Janet Kelso of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has determined Y chromosome sequences of three Neandertals and two Denisovans. These Y chromosomes provide new insights into the relationships and population histories of archaic and modern humans, including new evidence for ancient gene flow from early modern humans into Neandertals. (2020-09-24)

Blood vessel growth in muscle is reduced in women after menopause
A new study from the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports demonstrates that formation of small blood vessels is impaired in the muscle tissue of postmenopausal women. The study's findings highlight the importance of physical activity for women prior to and during menopause, as a means to prevent the development of disease later in life. (2020-09-22)

Different response of mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue to endurance e
In obese individuals, endurance exercise improves fitness and increases the number of mitochondria * and cellular respiration in skeletal muscles. However, the intervention has no effect on cellular respiration in adipose tissue. This is the result of a study by DZD researchers that has now been published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-09-09)

IoT results-oriented exercise system for social distancing with field sensors, no gym needed
An IoT system that allows geneticists, nutritionists, clinicians and exercise physiologists to work together remotely encourages middle-aged and elderly people to train using Interval Walking Training, in accordance to their individual peak aerobic capacity, greatly improving their physical fitness and lifestyle-related disease prognosis. (2020-09-03)

Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age
Depression or anxiety in adolescence is linked with a 20% greater likelihood of having a heart attack mid-life, according to research released today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-26)

Species competition and cooperation influence vulnerability to climate change
Organisms need to work together to adapt to climate change, especially in the presence of competitors, suggests a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-18)

Waistline matters in kidney disease
Does fat matter in kidney disease? The investigators found that all measures of higher abdominal fat content (including visceral fat, liver fat, or subcutaneous fat) and slower walk times were associated with increased levels of cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with non-dialysis dependent kidney disease. These data highlight that abdominal fat measures and lower physical fitness levels are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk in adults with non-dialysis dependent kidney disease. Waist circumference may be a new vital sign. (2020-08-13)

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