Current Flame Retardant News and Events

Current Flame Retardant News and Events, Flame Retardant News Articles.
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Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys
New research suggests that more than 100 chemicals found in plastic toy materials may pose possible health risks to children. The study provides findings that may lead to stricter international regulations. (2021-02-22)

Plastic recycling results in rare metals being found in children's toys and food packaging
Scientists from the University of Plymouth and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tested a range of new and used products - including children's toys, office equipment and cosmetic containers - and found they contained quantities of rare earth elements. (2021-02-17)

Commuters are inhaling unacceptably high levels of carcinogens
New UC Riverside research shows the average commuter in California is breathing unsustainably high levels of benzene and formaldehyde, two Prop. 65-listed, carcinogenic chemicals. (2021-02-15)

Plastics pose threat to human health
Plastics contain and leach hazardous chemicals, including endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that threaten human health. An authoritative new report, Plastics, EDCs, & Health, from the Endocrine Society and the IPEN (International Pollutants Elimination Network), presents a summary of international research on the health impacts of EDCs and describes the alarming health effects of widespread contamination from EDCs in plastics. (2020-12-15)

Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins
Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows. (2020-11-30)

Tracking and fighting fires on earth and beyond
Scientists demonstrate how fires burn and spread under different environmental conditions. (2020-11-23)

Microbe "rewiring" technique promises a boom in biomanufacturing
Berkeley Lab researchers have achieved unprecedented success in modifying a microbe to efficiently produce a compound of interest using a computational model and CRISPR-based gene editing. Their approach could dramatically speed up the research and development phase for new biomanufacturing processes, getting advanced bio-based products, such as sustainable fuels and plastic alternatives, on the shelves faster. (2020-11-10)

Chemicals in your living room cause diabetes
A new UC Riverside study shows flame retardants found in nearly every American home cause mice to give birth to offspring that become diabetic. (2020-11-10)

Blue whirl flame structure revealed with supercomputers
Main structure and flow structure of 'blue whirl' flame revealed through supercomputer simulations. Flame simulations entailed four million CPU hours distributed over the Deepthought2 system from the University of Maryland; the Thunder system from the Air Force Research Laboratory; and Stampede2 of TACC allocated through NSF-funded XSEDE. Further research on blue whirls might help scientists develop ways to burn fuels more cleanly. (2020-11-09)

Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects of PFASs could depend on the presence of estrogen
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have received intense scrutiny in recent years because of their persistence in the environment and potential endocrine-disrupting effects. However, their estrogenic activities are controversial, with different studies showing apparently contradictory results. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have used a combination of laboratory experiments and computer modeling to reveal that PFASs can interact with the estrogen receptor in different ways to influence estrogen-controlled gene expression. (2020-10-28)

A new approach boosts lithium-ion battery efficiency and puts out fires, too
Building new functionality into an overlooked lithium-ion battery component addresses two major goals of battery research: extending the driving range of electric vehicles and reducing the danger that laptops, cell phones and other devices will burst into flames. (2020-10-15)

Stanford researchers combine CAT scans and advanced computing to fight wildfires
Engineers at Stanford have used X-ray CT scans, more common in hospital labs, to study how wood catches fire. They've now turned that knowledge into a computer simulation to predict where fires will strike and spread. (2020-09-22)

High levels of toxic flame retardant chemicals found in dust inside college classrooms
There are good reasons to be worried about indoor air quality right now, in light of COVID-19. In addition to transmitting infectious agents, indoor spaces can also be a source of harmful chemicals in consumer products. A new analysis of indoor spaces on college campuses finds dust in classrooms and lecture halls harbors high levels of toxic flame retardants used in furniture raising health concerns from everyday exposures. (2020-09-03)

Our energy hunger is tethered to our economic past
Current world energy consumption is tied to unchangeable past economic production. And the way out of an ever-increasing rate of carbon emissions may not necessarily be ever-increasing energy efficiency--in fact it may be the opposite. (2020-08-27)

Plastic debris releases potentially harmful chemicals into seabird stomach fluid
A recent study has found that plastic ingested by northern fulmars, a common seabird, could release potentially toxic chemicals in their stomachs. Using plastic waste from the shore and stomach fluid from fulmars, the researchers closely mimicked fulmar plastic consumption. The findings highlight that plastic waste in the sea not only poses physical risks for seabirds, but could also have toxic effects. (2020-08-19)

Under pressure, nontoxic salt-based propellant performs well
In smaller spacecraft such as CubeSat satellites, a salt-based monopropellant is showing promise. It can be used both in high-thrust chemical propulsion for fast time-sensitive maneuvers, and electric mode for slow maneuvers, such as orbit maintenance. Now, researchers in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have more knowledge about how it performs under pressure to inform rocket design. (2020-08-18)

Safer, more comfortable soldier uniforms are in the works
Uniforms of U.S. Army soldiers must feel comfortable in all climates, be durable through multiple washings, resist fires and ward off insects, among other things. Existing fabrics don't check all of these boxes, so scientists have come up with a novel way of creating a flame-retardant, insect-repellent fabric that uses nontoxic substances. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

UMD researchers identify structure of blue whirls
'Blue whirls' -- small, spinning blue flames that produce almost no soot when they burn -- have attracted great interest since their discovery in 2016, in part because they represent a potential new avenue for low-emission combustion. Now, a team of researchers has identified how these intriguing whirls are structured. (2020-08-13)

New research reveals mysterious blue whirl flame structure
A recently discovered soot-free flame called a blue whirl - which consumes all fuel it encounters -- actually consists of three different flame structures that swirl together into one otherworldly blue ring, according to the first study to identify how these unique flames form. By revealing the blue whirl's structure, the findings may inform potential applications of the flame for. (2020-08-12)

What silicone wristbands say about chemical exposure in Uruguayan children
Researchers used silicone wristbands to examine the extent of chemical exposure among a small group of children in Montevideo, Uruguay. The 6- to 8-year-olds wore the bands for seven days. After analyzing the wristbands, researchers found an average of 13 pollutants in each one collected. Some of the wristbands showed exposure to DDT, a harmful pesticide that has been banned for use in many countries, including the U.S., since the 1970s. (2020-07-20)

Review of progress towards advanced Lithium-sulfur batteries
How should one design porous carbon materials for advanced Li-S batteries cathodes? What electrolytes are extensively studied for high-safety Li-S batteries? In a paper published in NANO, a group of researchers from Qingdao, China have reviewed the recent progresses in sulfur/carbon cathode materials and high safety electrolytes towards advanced Li-S batteries. Some potential issues and possible developmental directions are also discussed. (2020-07-13)

A shake-up in cell culturing: Flame sterilization may affect the culture
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that flame-sterilizing shake-flasks, to avoid introducing microbial contaminants, considerably increases the carbon dioxide concentration in the flasks. This enhanced carbon dioxide concentration affects the growth of some microbial species, which may affect the quantity of vaccines or other valuable substances produced by the microbes. (2020-07-01)

Nearly half of Americans lack knowledge of burn injuries and treatment
Summertime means Americans spend more time around grills, firepits, and fireworks, increasing their risk for fire-related burn injuries. While 53% of Americans say they know some or a lot about burn injuries and treatment, many mistakenly underestimate their risks with these activities, according to a new Arizona Burn Center at Valleywise Health/Ipsos survey. Only 11% know that fire-flame injuries such as those from a firepit or grill are the most common types of burn injuries. (2020-06-30)

KIST develops eco-friendly, flame-retardant carbon plastic ideal for recycling
A flame-retardant carbon-fiber-reinforced composite material has been developed. Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team from its Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, headed by Dr. Yong chae Jung used plant-originated tannic acid to develop a flame-retardant carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP), and also presented a method for its eco-friendly recycling. (2020-06-24)

Engineers find neat way to turn waste carbon dioxide into useful material
Making catalysts to convert waste carbon dioxide into useful industrial products has been expensive and complicated -- until now. UNSW engineers show it's as easy as playing with Lego. (2020-06-10)

Study finds another reason to wash hands: Flame retardants
Harmful flame retardants may be lurking on your hands and cell phone, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. (2020-06-09)

Study reveals birth defects caused by flame retardant
A new study from the University of Georgia has shown that exposure to a now-banned flame retardant can alter the genetic code in sperm, leading to major health defects in children of exposed parents. (2020-06-09)

Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health. (2020-06-01)

Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows. (2020-05-12)

A study analyzes the unexpected behavior of hydrogen flames
Hydrogen flames can propagate even with very little fuel, within surprisingly narrow gaps and can extend breaking up into fractal patterns. That is the unexpected physical behavior of this gas when it burns, which has been detected by a scientific team led by researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M). These results can help to improve the safety of Hydrogen-powered devices. (2020-05-12)

Study describes cocktail of pharmaceuticals in waters in Bangladesh
An analysis revealed that water samples held a cocktail of pharmaceuticals and other compounds, including antibiotics, antifungals, anticonvulsants, anesthetics, antihypertensive drugs, pesticides, flame retardants and more. Not all of these chemicals were found at every location, and sometimes amounts detected were low. But the ubiquity of contamination is concerning, scientists say. (2020-04-20)

SwRI fire study reveals how country, code variations impact escape time
Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) conducted room burn comparisons to better understand how country-specific fire codes in the U.S., France and the United Kingdom affect the fire safety of home furnishings and their contributions to flashover. Reducing the rate for flashover in a room burn can significantly save lives translating to more time for people to escape a fire. Flashover occurs when temperatures at the ceiling reach 1,000 degrees C and all the combustibles in the room ignite. (2020-03-03)

New commuter concern: Cancerous chemical in car seats
The longer your commute, the more you're exposed to a chemical flame retardant that is a known carcinogen and was phased out of furniture use because it required a Proposition 65 warning label in California. (2020-02-07)

New progress in turbulent combustion modeling: Filtered flamelet model
Recently, a new modeling idea for turbulent diffusion flame has been proposed by Lipo Wang's group from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Jian Zhang from the Institute of Mechanics, CAS. (2020-02-07)

Fireproof, lightweight solid electrolyte for safer lithium-ion batteries
Lithium-ion batteries are in everything from cell phones to cars. However, recent incidents involving fires or explosions of these devices show there's a need for safer batteries. One option is to replace the flammable liquid electrolyte with a solid-state electrolyte (SSE). But some of the most-studied SSEs are themselves flammable, leaving the original safety concern unaddressed. Researchers now report in ACS' Nano Letters that they have developed an SSE that won't burn up. (2020-02-05)

Safe potassium-ion batteries
Australian scientists have developed a nonflammable electrolyte for potassium and potassium-ion batteries, for applications in next-generation energy-storage systems beyond lithium technology. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists write that the novel electrolyte based on an organic phosphate makes the batteries safer and also allows for operation at reduced concentrations, which is a necessary condition for large-scale applications. (2020-01-31)

A new stretchable battery can power wearable electronics
The adoption of wearable electronics has so far been limited by their need to derive power from bulky, rigid batteries that reduce comfort and may present safety hazards due to chemical leakage or combustion. Stanford researchers have developed a soft and stretchable battery that relies on a special type of plastic to store power more safely than the flammable formulations used in conventional batteries today. (2020-01-24)

Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena
Caltech's Lihong Wang has adapted his picosecond imaging technology to take pictures and video of transparent objects like cells and phenomena like shockwaves. (2020-01-21)

Toward safer disposal of printed circuit boards 
Printed circuit boards are vital components of modern electronics. However, once they have served their purpose, they are often burned or buried in landfills, polluting the air, soil and water. Most concerning are the brominated flame retardants added to printed circuit boards to keep them from catching fire. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering have developed a ball-milling method to break down these potentially harmful compounds, enabling safer disposal. (2020-01-15)

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