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Current Flame Retardants News and Events, Flame Retardants News Articles.
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Experts discover historic roots of Medicare for All, public option and free-market proposals
As political leaders debate the future of the US health care system, a pair of health financing experts discovered that all of the current proposals -- from Medicare for All to 'repeal and replace' -- have been circulating in various forms since the 1940s. For example, today's 'public option' plans that would offer individuals the option to buy-in to Medicare or Medicaid were first proposed by two Republicans, Sen. Jacob Javits and Rep. John Lindsay in the early 1960s. (2019-04-01)

How to protect gymnasts from hazardous chemicals at gym facilities
In an intervention study, aimed at addressing high exposures among gymnasts to toxic flame retardant chemicals, researchers show that replacing the foam cubes in the landing pits with flame retardant-free alternatives can significantly reduce their exposures. (2019-03-26)

Children carry evidence of toxins from home flooring and furniture
Children living in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in their blood or urine than children from homes where these materials are not present, according to new Duke University-led research. The researchers presented their findings Feb. 17 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. (2019-02-17)

SDSU researchers find new way to measure nicotine exposure in children
A team of researchers from SDSU has found silicone wristbands to be an effective way to measure children's exposure to secondhand smoke. (2019-02-14)

Texas A&M researchers develop fire-retardant coating featuring renewable materials
Texas A&M University researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials (2019-02-12)

Research shows hidden fire risk of emollients
New research carried out by forensic scientists at Anglia Ruskin University has shown that commonly-used emollients can pose a significant fire risk once they have dried on fabric such as clothing and bedding. (2019-02-04)

Improved plastics recycling thanks to spectral imaging
Plastics recycling is complicated by the need to recycle similar plastics together. The presence of flame retardants in plastics also needs to be identified, and a NIR hyperspectral imaging method to do so is reported in this paper in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal, JSI -- Journal of Spectral Imaging. (2019-01-22)

'Environmentally friendly' flame retardant could degrade into less safe compounds
To reduce the risk of fire, many everyday products -- from building materials to furniture to clothing -- contain flame retardants. In recent years, some of these compounds were shown to have harmful effects on the environment, causing them to be replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives. However, a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicates that heat or ultraviolet light could break down a 'safe' flame retardant into potentially harmful compounds. (2019-01-09)

Exposure to cannabis alters the genetic profile of sperm
New research from Duke Health suggests men in their child-bearing years should consider how THC could impact their sperm and possibly the children they conceive during periods when they've been using the drug. Much like previous research that has shown tobacco smoke, pesticides, flame retardants and even obesity can alter sperm, the Duke research shows THC also affects epigenetics, triggering structural and regulatory changes in the DNA of users' sperm. (2018-12-19)

Should Santa wear a flame-retardant suit? (video)
Saint Nick faces a host of hazards during the holiday season, from the calories in cookies to the dying embers in your fireplace. A flame-retardant suit could save Santa from a seriously un-jolly circumstance. But many believe these molecules belong on the naughty list due to the potential risks they pose to human health. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of flame retardants and asks whether Father Christmas should bother swapping out his suit. (2018-12-13)

Toxic chemicals calling: Cell phones as a source of flame retardants
New research by environmental scientists at the University of Toronto suggests that the exterior of mobile phones could be a source of toxic chemicals, or at least an aggregate indicator of the chemicals to which people are exposed on a daily basis. (2018-12-04)

Study finds toxic flame retardants in children's car seats
Indiana University scientists have found toxic flame retardants in newly manufactured children's car seats, sparking concerns about children's health. Of the 18 children's car seats tested, 15 contained new or traditional hazardous flame retardant chemicals. (2018-12-03)

Study advocates psychological screening for the carers of child burn victims
A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology highlights the need for psychological screening for families/primary caregivers after a child sustains a burn injury. (2018-11-06)

Study uncovers high levels of previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, environment
Scientists at Indiana University found high levels of a previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, in an electronic waste recycling facility and in the natural environment. People are likely to be exposed to this pollutant by breathing contaminated dust or through skin contact. (2018-10-30)

Newly discovered moth named Icarus sports a flame-shaped mark and prefers high elevations
New species of owlet moth recently discovered to inhabit high-elevation mountains in western North America was named after the Greek mythological character Icarus. In their paper published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, scientists Dr. Lars Crabo and Dr. Christian Schmidt explain that the combination of the distinct flame-shaped mark on the moth's forewing and its high-elevation habitat was quick to remind them of the myth of Icarus. (2018-10-09)

Debate on banning organohalogen flame retardants heats up
Hundreds of everyday household items, from laptop computers to babies' high chairs, contain flame retardants to prevent the objects from catching fire. Recently, several groups petitioned a U.S. agency to ban flame retardants known as organohalogens, some of which can migrate out of household items. Others argue against blacklisting an entire class of compounds without further study, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2018-09-26)

Microbiome serves as sentinel for nerve gas exposure
Exposure to banned nerve agents remains a major public health concern globally, especially because of the recent air-release of these agents in Syria. One main problem is the difficulty of determining whether an exposure has occurred. Now, a new study demonstrates that the mammalian microbiome can act as a 'sentinel' due to its high responsiveness to exposure. (2018-09-14)

BPA replacements in plastics cause reproductive problems in lab mice
Twenty years ago, researchers made the accidental discovery that BPA had leached out of plastic cages used to house female mice in the lab, causing an increase in chromosomally abnormal eggs. Now, the same team is back to report in the journal Current Biology on Sept. 13 that the array of alternative bisphenols now used to replace BPA in BPA-free bottles, cups, cages, and other items appear to come with similar problems for their mice. (2018-09-13)

Many arctic pollutants decrease after market removal and regulation
Levels of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention are decreasing in the Arctic, according to an international team of researchers who have been actively monitoring the northern regions of the globe. (2018-08-27)

Smoked Out: Researchers develop a new wildfire smoke emissions model
A Brigham Young University chemical engineering professor and his Ph.D. student have developed an advanced model that can help predict pollution caused by wildfire smoke. The research, sponsored by the USDA Forest Service and the Department of Energy, provides a physical model that can more reliably predict soot and smoke emissions from wildfires over a range of conditions. (2018-08-24)

Large scale preparation method of high quality SWNT sponges
In a NANO paper published in NANO, a group of researchers have developed a simple flame burning method to prepare single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) sponges on a large scale. The SWNT sponge has multifunctional properties and can be used in the fields of cleaning-up, sensing and energy storage. (2018-08-23)

Renewables could drastically cut tailpipe emissions
Ethanol and related gasoline replacement fuels produce fewer smog-causing chemicals. (2018-08-12)

Scientists create a UV detector based on nanocrystals synthesized by using ion implantation
Scientists at the Lobachevsky University have been working for several years to develop solar-blind photodetectors operating in the UV spectral band. In the field of electronic technology, this is an important task, since such devices cut off emission with a wavelength higher than 280 nm, which helps to avoid interference from sunlight and to record UV emission during daylight. (2018-08-06)

NIST unblinded me with science: New application of blue light sees through fire
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated that ordinary blue light can be used to significantly improve the ability to see objects engulfed by large, non-smoky natural gas fires -- like those used in laboratory fire studies and fire-resistance standards testing. (2018-07-23)

OSU researchers determine why pulsed sparks make for better ignition
Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in all types of combustion systems. (2018-07-16)

Putting gas under pressure
Understanding gas flames' response to acoustic perturbations at high pressure should make next-generation turbines safer and more efficient. (2018-07-12)

Study raises concern about flame-retardant metabolites in bald eagles
A study finds that chemicals used in flame retardants, plasticizers and other commercial products are broken down through the process of metabolism into other compounds. Researchers say not enough is known about the dangers posed by those compounds, known as metabolites. (2018-07-11)

Fishy chemicals in farmed salmon
The American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology featured research by Carla Ng, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, on the cover of its June 19 issue. Dr. Ng tracked the presence of a class of synthetic flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were once a popular additive to increase fire resistance in consumer products such as electronics, textiles, and plastics. (2018-07-10)

Handwashing and house cleaning may protect against unhealthy chemicals
Washing your hands and cleaning your house frequently may help to lower your contact with common flame-retardant chemicals, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The study is the first to assess whether house cleaning and handwashing can effectively lower exposure to flame retardants. Results appear in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. (2018-06-28)

ChemMaps lets researchers navigate the chemical universe
A new online service -- ChemMaps -- allows users to interactively navigate the chemical space of over 8,000 drugs and 47,000 environmental compounds in 3D and real time. (2018-06-04)

Recycled electrical products lead to hazardous chemicals appearing in everyday items
Hazardous chemicals such as bromine, antimony and lead are finding their way into food-contact items and other everyday products because manufacturers are using recycled electrical equipment as a source of black plastic, according to a new study. (2018-05-30)

Minimizing exposure to common hormone-disrupting chemicals may reduce obesity rates
Everyday products carry environmental chemicals that may be making us fat by interfering with our hormones, according to research presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. Following recommendations on how to avoid these chemicals could help minimize exposure and potentially reduce the risk of obesity and its complications. (2018-05-19)

What is flame jetting? (video)
We know fuels like gasoline and alcohol can burn. But sometimes, when the conditions are just right, a hand-held container of fuel being poured near an ignition source can shoot out a 10-foot jet of flame. Flame jetting is extremely dangerous and has caused several deaths. In this video from Reactions, the bizarre phenomenon is explained with help from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives: https://youtu.be/5sfUl6GIdYo. (2018-04-17)

Chemical sleuthing leads to detection of little-known flame retardant in the environment
Chemists at Indiana University have published research findings on their discovery of a new and relatively unknown flame retardant in the environment. Their study is the first to detect the potentially toxic chemical in North America. (2018-04-16)

Childhood exposure to flame retardant chemicals declines following phase-out
Exposure to flame retardants once widely used in consumer products has been falling, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health. The researchers are the first to show that levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in children significantly decreased over a 15-year period between 1998 and 2013, although the chemicals were present in all children tested. (2018-04-04)

High levels of hazardous chemicals found in plastics collected from Lake Geneva
The first analysis of plastic litter from Lake Geneva finds toxic chemicals like cadmium, mercury and lead - - whose levels sometimes exceed the maximum permitted under EU law. The presence of chemicals that are now restricted or banned in plastic production reflects how old the plastic litter could be -- and indicates that like oceans, freshwater habitats are also affected by plastic pollution. (2018-04-03)

A less hazardous means to create phosphorus compounds
Scientists have identified a precursor that helps convert phosphorus into a range of useful compounds, all the while bypassing the need for hazardous intermediate substances that have been conventionally required for such reactions. (2018-02-08)

Minimizing exposure to harmful flame retardant chemicals in waste foams and plastics
Continued research and new policies and practices to ensure proper use and disposal of foam and plastic products that contain potentially harmful flame retardant chemicals are needed to minimize health risks from environmental exposure to humans and animals. (2018-01-29)

UV laser photolyses to enhance diamond growth
Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA, reported on a new laser-enabled synthesis route to explore the advantages of laser photochemistry in practical material synthesis in a recent article in Light: Science & Applications. In this work, it is demonstrated that UV laser photolysis of hydrocarbon species altered the flame chemistry to promote the diamond growth rate and film quality. The authors found that the UV laser photolysis plays a key role in suppressing the formation of the side products, nondiamond carbons. (2018-01-25)

Pearly material for bendable heating elements (video)
The iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices. (2018-01-24)

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