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Current Flood News and Events, Flood News Articles.
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Coastal flooding set to get more frequent, threatening coastal life and global GDP
Coastal flooding across the world is set to rise by around 50 per cent due to climate change in the next 80 years, endangering millions more people and trillions of US dollars more of coastal infrastructure, new research shows. (2020-07-30)

Novel theory of climate dynamics: Three-pattern decomposition of global atmospheric circulation
Due to the lack of a complete theoretical system for climate prediction, the forecasting of drought and flood in summer of China has always been a major scientific problem for meteorologists. A recent study has made up for this very shortage and has offered new opportunities in improving the prediction accuracy of major climate events in China and even in the world. This work was published in SCIENCE CHINA: Earth Sciences. (2020-07-23)

An international study analyzes five hundred years of floods in Europe
An international research project coordinated by the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), with participation from researchers of the University of Barcelona, shows for the first time that flood pattern over the last decades in Europe have changed compared to past centuries. The study, published in the journal Nature, concludes we are in one of the most flood-rich periods in Europe from the last five hundred years. (2020-07-23)

Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe
Studying historical documents from 5 centuries, scientists were able to compare flood events from the past with recent flood events in Europe. This combination of historical and hydrological research provides evidence for the strong influence of climate change on rivers and floodings. Floods tend to be larger, the timing has shifted and the relationship between flood occurrence and air temperatures has reversed. (2020-07-22)

Uplifting of Columbia River basalts opens window on how region was sculpted
Information drawn from analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of materials from exposed Columbia River basalts has provided insights about how magma from volcanic eruptions millions of years ago shaped the region and why those eruptions did not trigger a global extinction event. (2020-07-17)

Using the past to predict the future: The case of Typhoon Hagibis
The past is often the window to our future, especially when it comes to natural disasters. Using data from the 2018 floods that struck southwestern Japan to calibrate a machine learning model, researchers from the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University and the Japan-Peru Center for Earthquake Engineering Research and Disaster Mitigation (CISMID, in Spanish), have successfully identified the flooding caused by Typhoon Hagibis. (2020-07-15)

Scientists predict dramatic increase in flooding, drought in California
California may see a 54 percent increase in rainfall variability by the end of this century, according to research from a UC Davis atmospheric scientist. (2020-07-15)

HKBU research reveals greater flood risks in the coastal region of China
A research led by the Department of Geography at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has revealed that the observed average moving speed (or translation speed) of tropical cyclones making landfall over the coast of China dropped by 11% between 1961 and 2017. These slow-moving tropical cyclones brought about 20% more local total rainfall on average when compared with fast-moving ones, resulting in greater flood risks in the region. (2020-07-15)

Historic floods reveal how salt marshes can save lives in the future
By digging into major historic records of flood disasters, a research team led by scientists from the Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Delft University of Technology, Deltares and Antwerp University, reveal in a publication this week in Nature Sustainability that the value of nature for flood defense has actually been evident for hundreds of years. (2020-06-29)

Size matters for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage
New research has shown that Drax power station in North Yorkshire is the optimal site for the carbon capture and storage facilities that will be needed reduce carbon emissions and achieve the targets of 2016 Paris Climate Agreement. (2020-06-29)

Tiny Japanese dinosaur eggs help unscramble Cretaceous ecosystem
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba excavated over 1300 eggshell fossils from the Lower Cretaceous Ohyamashimo Formation of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Over 96% of these fossils, including numerous fragments, four partial and almost complete eggs in an in situ nest, belonged to a new ootaxon the authors named Himeoolithus murakamii, attributed to a small non-avian theropod dinosaur. The remaining eggshell fragments, belonging to five additional small theropod ootaxa, showed notable biodiversity. (2020-06-26)

Carbon cycling in wet soils
Testing microbial activity in soil columns helps researchers understand how carbon is stored in soils that are periodically waterlogged. (2020-06-25)

Climate change and the rise of the Roman Empire and the fall of the Ptolemies
The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 B.C.E. triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the rise of the Roman Empire. To the south, Egypt, which Cleopatra was attempting to restore as a major power in the Eastern Mediterranean, was shook by Nile flood failures, famine, and disease. A new study reveals the role climate change played in these ancient events. (2020-06-22)

Human activity on rivers outpaces, compounds effects of climate change
The livelihoods of millions of people living along the world's biggest river systems are under threat by a range of stressors caused by the daily economic, societal and political activity of humans -- in addition to the long-term effects of climate change, researchers report. (2020-06-19)

Beavers are diverse forest landscapers
Beavers are ecosystem engineers that cut down trees to build dams, eventually causing floods. Beaver-induced floods make forest landscapes and habitats increasingly diverse, but very little is known about the long-term effects of beavers on European landscapes. Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Helsinki examined the history and occurrence of beaver-induced floods and patch dynamics in southern Finland. They used a unique dataset of field observations from 1970 to 2018. (2020-06-10)

NASA finds post-tropical depression Cristobal soaking the Great Lakes
NASA's GPM satellite gathered data on what is now Post-Tropical Cyclone Cristobal and revealed some areas of heavy rain were occurring. Cristobal was bringing rainfall and gusty winds to the Great Lakes Region and still generating warnings. (2020-06-10)

A sharper view of flood risk
Extreme weather patterns and regions at risk of flooding could be easier to spot using a new statistical model for large spatial datasets. (2020-06-08)

Lessening water quality problems caused by hurricane-related flooding
June 1 is the start of hurricane season in the Atlantic, and with 2020 predicted to be particularly active, residents in coastal regions are keeping watchful eyes on the weather. Flooding is often the most damaging effect of tropical storms, and it can disproportionately affect vulnerable people and ecosystems. Now, in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, researchers study water quality impacts of two recent hurricanes in North Carolina and suggest interventions to protect susceptible areas. (2020-06-01)

Food webs determine the fate of mercury pollution in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon
In the Grand Canyon reach of the Colorado River, two species play an outsized role in the fate of mercury in the aquatic ecosystem, and their numbers are altered by flood events. (2020-05-15)

DNA metabarcoding reveals metacommunity dynamics in a threatened boreal wetland
Researchers working in Alberta's Peace-Athabasca Delta found that DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for detection of a broad range of biodiversity in water samples compared to traditional morphological identification methods. (2020-05-12)

Multiple flooding sources threaten Honolulu's infrastructure
In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, found in the next few decades, sea level rise will likely cause large and increasing percentages of land area to be impacted simultaneously by the three flood mechanisms. Further, they found direct marine inundation represents the least extensive--only three percent of the predicted flooding, while groundwater inundation represents the most extensive flood source. (2020-05-04)

Avoid making exceptions for research quality during COVID-19 pandemic
Global crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, argue Alex London and Jonathan Kimmelman in a Policy Forum. (2020-04-23)

Reducing the risk to children's health in flood-prone areas of India
Monsoon rainfall has become more unpredictable in India. Floods and droughts have become more common and pose multiple risks to human health and wellbeing, with children under five being particularly vulnerable. New research finds that more assistance needs to be provided to communities in flood-prone areas to protect children under 5 from undernutrition. (2020-04-14)

Indigenous knowledge could reveal ways to weather climate change on islands
Some islands have such low elevation, that mere inches of sea-level rise will flood them, but higher, larger islands will also be affected by changes in climate and an understanding of ancient practices in times of climate change might help populations survive, according to researchers. (2020-04-06)

More pavement, more problems
Think your daily coffee, boutique gym membership and airport lounge access cost a lot? There may be an additional, hidden cost to those luxuries of urban living, says a new Johns Hopkins University study: more flooding. For every percentage point increase in roads, parking lots and other impervious surfaces that prevent water from flowing into the ground, annual floods increase on average by 3.3%, the researchers found. (2020-04-06)

Ecosystem services are not constrained by borders
What do chocolate, migratory birds, flood control and pandas have in common? Many countries benefit from ecosystem services provided outside their nations. This can happen through economic relationships, biological and geographical conditions, but we hardly know how and where these ecosystem service flows occur. Scientists show in a recent study, published in the journal Global Environmental Change, how interregional ecosystem service flows can be identified and quantified. (2020-03-30)

New insights into US flood vulnerability revealed from flood insurance big data
An international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has found that current estimates of flood risk rely upon methods for calculating flood damage which are inadequately verified and match poorly with observations. (2020-03-19)

'Spillway' for electrons could keep lithium metal batteries from catching fire
UC San Diego nanoengineers developed a safety feature that prevents lithium metal batteries from rapidly overheating and catching fire in case of an internal short circuit. The clever tweak does not prevent battery failure, but rather provides advance warning of failure and makes it much safer. (2020-03-12)

Natural bayou better when floods threaten Houston
A comparison of flood plains around Houston's two major bayous shows the natural Buffalo Bayou is far better at managing floodwaters than the channelized Brays Bayou. (2020-03-11)

New flood damage framework helps planners prepare for sea-level rise
Princeton researchers have developed a new framework allowing urban planners and policymakers to consider a combination of responses to sea-level rise and, if hard structures, how high these protections should be built, depending on their tolerance for risk and the projected financial losses to a particular area due to flooding. (2020-03-11)

Research shows mangrove conservation can pay for itself in flood protection
The natural coastal defenses provided by mangrove forests reduce annual flooding significantly in critical hotspots around the world. Without mangroves, flood damages would increase by more than $65 billion annually, and 15 million more people would be flooded, according to a new study published March 10, 2020 in Scientific Reports. (2020-03-10)

NASA tracks ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther over Northern Territory
NASA's Aqua satellite continues to provide forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds and storms, now over the Barkly Region of Australia's Northern Territory. (2020-03-04)

Study find delta helps to decrease the impact of river flooding
Most coastal cities and ports face a double threat from storm surge and river flooding. Infrastructure development along waterways and sea-level rise increase vulnerability for these communities. In a recent publication, The Propagation of Fluvial Flood Waves Through a Backwater-Estuarine Environment, historical data is examined to determine how to reduce the risk of coastal river flooding to communities. (2020-03-04)

Texas A&M researchers develop flooding prediction tool
By incorporating the architecture of city drainage systems and readings from flood gauges into a comprehensive statistical framework, researchers at Texas A&M University can now accurately predict the evolution of floods in extreme situations like hurricanes. With their new approach, the researchers said their algorithm could forecast the flow of flood water in almost real-time, which can then lead to timelier emergency response and planning. (2020-03-03)

NASA sees ex-tropical cyclone Esther move back into northern territory
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds that have now moved over Australia's Northern Territory. The remnants have generated a flood watch including in the Tanami and Central Deserts. (2020-03-03)

NASA finds ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther moving back inland
Ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther just won't give up. The storm formed in the South Pacific Ocean, tracked across Australia's Northern Territory and reached the Kimberley coast of Western Australia, and has now turned around. NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm turning back into Western Australia on March 2, 2020. (2020-03-02)

NASA sees tropical cyclone 18p form near American Samoa
The low-pressure area that has been lingering west-northwest of American Samoa for several days has organized into a tropical depression. NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Depression 18P. (2020-02-21)

Delivering bad news: 'Patients remember these conversations forever'
Despite known protocols and recommendations on how to break bad news to patients, many physicians report insufficient training about how to conduct these challenging conversations. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has found a better way, according to a newly published study. A new class offered to Feinberg medical students uses an approach called 'simulation-based mastery learning' to train physicians to have difficult conversations with patients in a clear and compassionate way. (2020-02-20)

Study reveals hidden risks of estuary development for young salmon
A Simon Fraser University-led research team has found significant evidence that human activity in estuaries is impacting juvenile Pacific and Atlantic salmon. The team's review of 167 peer-reviewed studies identified negative impacts from several stressors, including the effects of flood-protecting tidal gates, pollution and habitat modification. (2020-02-20)

Wikipedia, a source of information on natural disasters biased towards rich countries
This is the result of a study led by Valerio Lorini, a PhD student on the ICT programme, led by Carlos Castillo, coordinator of the Web Science and Social Computing group, with Javier Rando, a student at UPF doing the bachelor's degree in Mathematical Engineering in Data Science, focusing on flooding as a case study. Their work will be presented at ISCRAM 2020, from 24 to 27 May in Virginia (USA). (2020-02-06)

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