Current Fluorescent Proteins News and Events

Current Fluorescent Proteins News and Events, Fluorescent Proteins News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Cre-controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. The findings were published in the journal ''Nature Communications.'' (2021-02-23)

Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-02-22)

BU researchers identify biochemical process responsible for producing toxic tau
Tau is a protein that helps stabilize the internal skeleton of nerve cells (neurons) in the brain. Groups of toxic tau protein, termed tau oligomers, drive disease progression and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows how these tau oligomers form, and, correspondingly, how they can be prevented. (2021-02-22)

Colorful connection found in coral's ability to survive higher temperatures
A coral's color can tell of its resilience to climate change, and a new study from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has shed light on the underlying genetic factors that may be at work behind this. (2021-02-21)

Researchers find evidence of protein folding at site of intracellular droplets
Researchers at the University of Notre Dame found that elevated concentrations of proteins within the droplets triggered a folding event, increasing the potential for protein aggregation -- or misfolding -- which has been linked to neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (2021-02-19)

A novel gel electrophoresis technique for rapid biomarker diagnosis via mass spectrometry
Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis enables high-resolution separation of proteins extracted from biological samples, but it requires more than one day of pretreatment to recover the separated proteins trapped inside the gel for detection by mass spectrometry. BAC-DROP, our novel electrophoresis technology, uses a dissolvable form of polyacrylamide gel, which allows sample pretreatment to be completed in about 5 hours. The developed technology will enable the rapid diagnosis of viruses and disease protein markers. (2021-02-18)

Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation
A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips. (2021-02-18)

Ultrabright dots see beyond skin deep
Tiny light-emitting probes give researchers a better option for noninvasive imaging of living tissue. (2021-02-16)

Cloudy eyes caused by protein imbalance
Cataracts are the most common eye ailment in humans. However, the exact processes leading to this condition are not fully understood. A team of researchers headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that the composition of the protein solution plays a decisive role. Their conclusions are contrary to prevailing opinion in the field. (2021-02-16)

Finding coronavirus's helper proteins
A group of scientists led by EMBL's Mikhail Savitski, Nassos Typas, and Pedro Beltrao, and collaborator Steeve Boulant at Heidelberg University Hospital, have analysed how the novel coronavirus affects proteins in human cells. They identified several human proteins as potential drug targets to prevent viral replication. (2021-02-16)

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex
Researchers at University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins. (2021-02-15)

New insight into protein structures that could treat Huntington's disease
In Huntington's disease, a faulty protein aggregates in brain cells and eventually kills them. Such protein aggregates could, in principle, be prevented with a heat shock protein. However, it is not well known how these proteins interact with the Huntington's disease protein. New research by Patrick van der Wel (University of Groningen) and colleagues at the University of Texas has partially resolved the structure of heat shock proteins that bind to such aggregating proteins. (2021-02-12)

Medication-based starvation of cancer cells
Immunomodulatory drugs, including the Contergan derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide have significantly improved the therapy of hematologic malignancies such as multiple myeloma. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now further decoded the mode of action in this class of medications. At the same time, they identified new innovative targeted cancer therapies. (2021-02-12)

Capturing free-space optical light for high-speed wifi
Visible and infrared light can carry more data than radio waves, but has always been confined to a hard-wired, fiber-optic cable. Working with Facebook's Connectivity Lab, a Duke research team has now made a major advance toward the dream of ditching the fiber in fiber optics. (2021-02-11)

Cell biology - Overseers of cell death
A new study shows that proteins called IAPs, which can trigger programmed cell death, are inhibited by a specific chemical modification, and reveals that they play a wider role in protein quality control than previously assumed. (2021-02-10)

New study discovers possible early detection method for elusive ovarian cancer
A study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School found a way to detect the presence of ovarian cancer in patients using Pap test samples, normally used to detect cervical cancer. (2021-02-09)

New methods for exploring the 'dark matter' of biology
New tools and methods have been described by WEHI researchers to study an unusual protein modification and gain fresh insights into its roles in human health and disease. The study - about how certain sugars modify proteins - was published today in Nature Chemical Biology. Led by WEHI researcher Associate Professor Ethan Goddard-Borger, this work lays a foundation for better understanding diseases like muscular dystrophy and cancer. (2021-02-04)

Breast cancer-on-a-chip for testing immunotherapy drugs
A collaborative team from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) successfully designed and tested a breast cancer-on-a-chip and rapid assay for screening immunotherapy drugs. (2021-02-02)

Neurons: 'String of lights' indicates excitation propagation
A type of novel molecular voltage sensor makes it possible to watch nerve cells at work. The principle of the method has been known for some time. However, researchers at the University of Bonn and the University of California in Los Angeles have now succeeded in significantly improving it. It allows the propagation of electrical signals in living nerve cells to be observed with high temporal and spatial resolution. (2021-02-02)

High-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Tohoku University, Toin University of Yokohama, and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) have succeeded in developing a scanless high-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution for a 3D space. The system is based on digital holography. The developed microscopy system has an algorithm to acquire 3D information of fluorescent objects toward scanless 3D measurement in less than 1 millisecond. (2021-01-29)

How lipids distribute proteins within cells
Researchers have observed how lipids distribute proteins within cells, a discovery that could open the door to understanding the causes of protein transport related diseases, such as cancer or neurodegenerative diseases (2021-01-29)

UArizona researchers develop smartphone-based COVID-19 test
The team is adapting a smartphone-based method -- originally designed to detect the presence of norovirus -- for COVID-19 testing. (2021-01-29)

Dewdrops on a spiderweb reveal the physics behind cell structures
Researchers in the laboratories of Princeton University scientists Joshua Shaevitz, Howard Stone, and Sabine Petry have discovered that surface tension drives the liquid-like protein TPX2 to form globules that nucleate the formation of branching microtubules during cell division. The paper detailing these discoveries appeared in the Jan 28 issue of the journal Nature Physics. (2021-01-29)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

Continuous monitoring of proteins a game-changer for patients with deteriorating health
A world-first discovery by Australian researchers could become a game-changer for patients at risk of rapid health deterioration, such as heart complications, stroke, sepsis and cancer. Researchers developed an antibody as a biosensor, to continuously monitor rapid changes in the concentration of EGFR, a protein present on cancer cells and in body fluids. (2021-01-25)

First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULiège demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development. (2021-01-25)

Immunology - Functionality of immune cells in early life
A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers shows that putatively immature dendritic cells found in young children are able to induce robust immune responses. The results could lead to improved vaccination protocols. (2021-01-21)

New biochemical clues in cell receptors help explain how SARS-CoV-2 may hijack human cells
The SARS-CoV-2 virus may enter and replicate in human cells by exploiting newly-identified sequences within cell receptors, according to work from two teams of scientists. (2021-01-21)

Fishing out the bad apples: Novel quantitative method to assess the safety of food
Histamine is a dangerous compound that occurs in spoiled food, such as mackerel, left at room temperature for too long. Unfortunately, existing histamine detection methods are inconvenient and expensive. To tackle this issue, a team of scientists from Chung-Ang University, Korea, has developed a novel histamine quantification strategy based on fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and histamine-binding peptides. Their approach is simple and inexpensive and allows one to efficiently assess food safety. (2021-01-19)

Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane (2021-01-15)

Pillarene hybrid material shows enhanced tunable multicolor luminescence and sensing ability
Tunable luminescent materials are highly desirable owing to their broad application potential in various fields. Recently, a pillar[5]arene-based hybrid material with stimuli-responsive luminescent properties and ion sensing abilities has been elegantly constructed from a pyridine-modified conjugated pillar[5]arene and a planar chromophore oligo(phenylenevinylene) upon coordination of Cd (II) metal cores. Enhanced and tunable luminescence was achieved via the construction of the rigid coordinated structure and the effective modulation of pillar[5]arene. (2021-01-14)

Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments. (2021-01-14)

Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from the University of Cambridge, the University of Milan and Google Research have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds. (2021-01-14)

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life
A breakthrough that has implications for molecular biology, pharmacology and nanotechnologies. The fields of application are many. Identifying the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative processes in some proteins, for example, can help limit their proliferation. Understanding how a protein takes on a certain shape can open the way to use the nanomachines that nature has designed to cut, edit or block damaged or defective genes. Their study was published in the international academic journal Physical Review Letters (2021-01-14)

Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes
New probes allow scientists to see four-stranded DNA interacting with molecules inside living human cells, unravelling its role in cellular processes. (2021-01-13)

Chloroplasts on the move
How different plants can share their genetic material with each other (2021-01-11)

Pillar-like molecules as biosensors for metabolites
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that a molecule known as pillar[6]arene can form a host-guest compound with a cancer-associated metabolite. The phenomenon can be used to efficiently detect the metabolite in crude biological samples, which is important for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome and associated pathologies. (2021-01-11)

Treating an autoimmune disease in mice with an mRNA vaccine
Christina Krienke and colleagues have designed an mRNA vaccine that delayed the onset of and reduced the severity of multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. (2021-01-07)

HKUST researchers discover a novel mechanism of recruiting ARF family proteins to specific subcellul
Researchers of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) recently uncovered a novel molecular mechanism that regulates the subcellular localizations of Arf proteins, shedding light on the mechanism underlying various inherited diseases and offering new insight to the treatment of them. (2021-01-05)

Protein twist and squeeze confers cancer drug resistance
In 1986, cellular biochemist Kazumitsu Ueda, currently at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), discovered that a protein called ABCB1 could transport multiple chemotherapeutics out of some cancer cells, making them resistant to treatment. How it did this has remained a mystery for the past 35 years. Now, his team has published a review in the journal FEBS Letters, summarizing what they have learned following years of research on this and other ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. (2020-12-29)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.