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A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. (2019-03-15)
Novel methods for analyzing neural circuits for innate behaviors in insects
We established a method for activity-dependent visualization of neural circuits in the fruit fly brain. (2019-03-14)
Bat flight model can inspire smarter, nimbler drones
Engineers at the University of British Columbia have captured the full complexity of bat flight in a three-dimensional computer model for the first time, potentially inspiring the future design of better drones and other aerial vehicles. (2019-03-13)
No super-Drosophila: Vinegar fly species have a good vision or olfaction, but not both
A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. (2019-03-12)
High-speed, 3D microscope captures stunning videos of fruit fly nerve cells in action
Columbia engineers and neuroscientists have joined forces to create 3D videos of individual nerve cells moving, stretching and switching on inside fruit fly larvae as they move. (2019-03-07)
Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air
Nearly 100 species of swift are completely adapted to life in the air. (2019-03-06)
CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. (2019-02-26)
Antarctic flies protect fragile eggs with 'antifreeze'
A molecular analysis by the University of Cincinnati found that wingless flies protected their eggs with a temperature-resistant gel to help them withstand freezing and thawing in Antarctica. (2019-02-22)
Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form
How do fruit flies grow their wings? Rutgers scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases. (2019-02-21)
How zebra stripes disrupt flies' flight patterns
Scientists learned in recent years why zebras have black and white stripes -- to avoid biting flies. (2019-02-20)
Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies
Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep, in flies at least, is essential for staying alive. (2019-02-20)
Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work. (2019-02-20)
Male Y chromosomes not 'genetic wastelands'
Researchers from the University of Rochester have found a way to sequence a large portion of the Y chromosome in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster--the most that the Y chromosome has been assembled in fruit flies. (2019-02-06)
Study shows flight limitations of earliest feathered dinosaurs
Anchiornis, one of the earliest feathered dinosaurs ever discovered, was found to have the ability to fly. (2019-01-28)
Mapping the neural circuit of innate responses to odors
Animal responses to odors can be learned or innate. The innate capacity to discern between an appetizing and a foul -- i.e., dangerous -- odor is essential, from the start, to guide behavior for survival. (2019-01-17)
Three-day imaging captures hi-res, cinematic view of fly brain
Fluorescent tagging of cellular proteins has allowed unprecedentedly detailed images of brain circuits, but imaging neurons and synapses over large areas in fine detail is difficult. (2019-01-17)
Next generation photonic memory devices are light-written, ultrafast and energy efficient
Researchers of the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a 'hybrid technology' which shows the advantages of both light and magnetic hard drives. (2019-01-14)
Longer siesta on bright days
Insects and mammals have special sensors for different light intensities. (2019-01-11)
Mothers use sex pheromones to veil eggs, preventing cannibalism
In a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology on Jan. (2019-01-10)
Flies release neuronal brakes to fly longer
How does the insect brain coordinate the timing for such long flight bouts? (2019-01-08)
Fruit flies help to shed light on the evolution of metabolism
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered that the ability to use sugar as food varies strongly between closely related fruit fly species. (2019-01-03)
Fewer monarch butterflies are reaching their overwintering destination
The monarch butterfly is currently experiencing dire problems with its migration in eastern North America. (2019-01-02)
Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves
All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. (2018-12-20)
Neuroscience-protein that divides the brain
A recent study published in iScience researchers at Kanazawa University describes the role of a molecule, Netrin, in creating borders inside the brain to compartmentalize the functions of the brain. (2018-12-17)
Novel mechanisms of dengue and Zika virus infections and link to microcephaly
New insights into how dengue and Zika viruses cause disease reveal strategies the viruses use to successfully infect their host and a link to microcephaly. (2018-12-13)
New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions
A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. (2018-12-12)
Brain activity shows development of visual sensitivity in autism
Research investigating how the brain responds to visual patterns in people with autism has shown that sensory responses change between childhood and adulthood. (2018-12-11)
How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls
Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. (2018-12-07)
Modeling the microbiom
The gut microbiome -- the world of microbes that inhabit the human intestinal tract -- has captured the interest of scientists and clinicians for its critical role in health. (2018-12-05)
A study describes the dynamics of chromatin during organ and tissue regeneration
The researchers, who conducted the analysis with Drosphila melanogaster, discovered a group of genes involved in regeneration and which are kept in different species. (2018-12-04)
How microbial interactions shape our lives
The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington. (2018-12-04)
To detect new odors, fruit fly brains improve on a well-known computer algorithm
It might seem like fruit flies would have nothing in common with computers, but new research from the Salk Institute reveals that the two identify novel information in similar ways. (2018-12-03)
Illuminating the mysterious cultures of fruit flies
The lady fruit flies that inhabit your banana bowl may find green-colored mates with curly wings simply irresistible -- conforming to the 'local dating culture' of generations of female flies before them, a new study finds. (2018-11-29)
Resource-based communities: Not just all work and no play
A new study by University of Alberta scientists explores how leisure and recreation access can improve social connections in resource-based communities like Fort McMurray. (2018-11-28)
Putting hybrid-electric aircraft performance to the test
Although hybrid-electric cars are becoming commonplace, similar technology applied to airplanes comes with significantly different challenges. (2018-11-27)
The origins of asymmetry: A protein that makes you do the twist
Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand. (2018-11-22)
Transparent fruit flies
A new kind of microscope has been developed in Vienna: it creates 2D light sheets, penetrating biological tissues and causing special molecules to fluoresce. (2018-11-22)
MIT engineers fly first-ever plane with no moving parts
MIT engineers have built and flown the first-ever plane with no moving parts. (2018-11-21)
Clemson researchers reveal secrets of parasite that causes African sleeping sickness
A team of Clemson University researchers wants to protect humans and other mammals from the debilitating and even deadly effects of African sleeping sickness. (2018-11-20)
Controlling organ growth with light
In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. (2018-11-16)
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