Current Folk Medicines News and Events

Current Folk Medicines News and Events, Folk Medicines News Articles.
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Texas A&M-UTMB team identifies potential drug to treat SARS-CoV-2
A federally approved heart medication shows significant effectiveness in interfering with SARS-CoV-2 entry into the human cell host, according to a new study by a research team from Texas A&M University and The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). (2021-02-22)

How likely are consumers to adopt artificial intelligence for banking advice?
A new study published in Economic Inquiry is the first to assess the willingness of consumers to adopt advisory services in the banking sector that are based on artificial intelligence (AI). (2021-02-18)

Partners' company helps us stay connected during pandemic
A pair of UCR studies reveal that living with a romantic partner helps people feel more socially connected during COVID-19. But no other pandemic-era social dynamic carries notable benefits, the researchers found: not your kids, not kibitzing with your bestie on Facetime, and not your adorable-adoring pets. (2021-02-16)

Almost half of virus sufferers report depression
Almost half of people testing positive for coronavirus have reported symptoms of depression, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. (2021-02-15)

Novel 3D printed stents deliver breakthrough treatment for oesophageal cancer
World-first 3D printed oesophageal stents developed by the University of South Australia could revolutionise the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to provide more accurate, effective and personalised treatment for patients with oesophageal cancer. (2021-02-02)

Genetic screening before prescribing could benefit millions
New research finds that millions of UK patients could benefit from genetic screening (cheek swab) before being prescribed common medications including antidepressants, stomach ulcer treatments and painkillers. More than 95 per cent of the population carry a genetic marker that predicts an atypical response to at least one medicine. The study looked at nine of these genetic markers, affecting 56 medicines where there are known drug-gene interactions. (2021-01-29)

Antibiotics combinations used regularly worldwide--but 80% of these not recommended by WHO
Fixed dose combinations of antibiotics are consumed in huge quantities globally, but 80 percent of combinations are not on the WHO Essential Medicines List, and 92 percent are not FDA-approved, - with inappropriate combinations risking inefficacy, toxicity, and selection for antimicrobial resistance. (2021-01-20)

Researchers show Irish soil can offer more hope in fight against antibiotic resistance
Scientists who highlighted the bug-busting properties of bacteria in Northern Irish soil have made another exciting discovery in the quest to discover new antibiotics. (2021-01-14)

Are autism drugs on the horizon?
Are Autism Drugs on the Horizon? Hebrew University Identifies Genetic Mutation Associated with Autism, Offering Hope for Effective Therapeutics (2021-01-11)

Simple monitoring could reduce medicine misuse in care homes
Nurse-led monitoring of patients for signs and symptoms associated with documented 'undesirable effects' of medicines has potential to prevent avoidable harm, and optimize prescribing. (2021-01-11)

Traditional Ghanaian medicines show promise against tropical diseases
The discovery of new drugs is vital to achieving the eradication of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in Africa and around the world. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have identified traditional Ghanaian medicines which work in the lab against schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, three diseases endemic to Ghana. (2020-12-31)

UC researcher urges caution using remdesivir to treat COVID-19
Research at the University of Cincinnati, however, contends that this antiviral drug is being used too indiscriminately when treating patients hospitalized with the virus. The study is published in the journal Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-29)

New therapeutic target pinpointed for stomach cancer
WEHI researchers have identified a key molecular regulator, TNF, which is involved in the progression and spread of stomach cancer, suggesting a potential new approach to treat this devastating disease. (2020-12-16)

Undruggable diseases gain a new RNA drug-discovery tool
A new RNA-targeting tool enables scientists to tackle difficult molecular recognition problems to aid drug discovery for incurable diseases. (2020-12-15)

Nature s contributions to people found to be in decline
Over the past 50 years, declining biodiversity has put many of nature s contributions to people at risk. This is the conclusion reached by fifteen leading international experts, including a French ethnoecologist at the CNRS. Based on the IPBES Global Assessment, their work is the subject of an article, published this week in the journal PNAS, which discusses the risks to human well-being and prosperity resulting from the continuing degradation of the environment. (2020-12-09)

Using targeted microbubbles to administer toxic cancer drugs
New research has shown how microbubbles carrying powerful cancer drugs can be guided to the site of a tumour using antibodies. Microbubbles are small manufactured spheres half the size of a red blood cell - and scientists believe they can be used to transport drugs to highly specific locations within the body. (2020-12-08)

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools
New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures. (2020-11-02)

New drug carrier systems
A UD research team has devised tiny cargo-carrying systems many times smaller than a human hair, made from molecules called peptides that help provide structure for cells and tissues. The team has reported advances in the nanoparticle design that allow them to control the shape of the nanoparticles to allow them to better bind to tissue in the body and stay in a particular location. (2020-10-08)

Identifying, preventing and managing heart rhythm side effects of medicines
Arrhythmias are irregular heartbeats and can be caused by a variety of factors, such as genetics, heart disease, high blood pressure or electrolyte imbalances. Many commonly used medications, including over-the-counter medicines, can cause or worsen arrhythmias. Health care professionals should consider that a patient's arrhythmia may be caused or worsened by a medication. (2020-09-15)

Drugs bill warning over US/UK trade deal
The NHS would spend billions of pounds more on drugs if it had to pay US prices following a US/UK trade deal. According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Oxford, NHS England would have spent over £5 billion more on 50 brand-name prescription drugs widely used in primary care if it had paid US prices in 2018. (2020-09-10)

Children with asthma could benefit from prescribing according to genetic differences
Selecting treatments according to genetic differences could help children and teenagers with asthma, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The trial, which compares patients treated according to small genetic differences with patients treated according to existing guidelines, is the first of its kind in children and teenagers. (2020-09-07)

Search for COVID-19 drugs boosted by SARS discovery
An extensive search and testing of current drugs and drug-like compounds has revealed compounds previously developed to fight SARS might also work against COVID-19. Using the National Drug Discovery Centre, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute identified drug-like compounds that could block a key coronavirus protein called PLpro. Initially developed as potential treatments for SARS, the compounds prevented the growth of the SARS-CoV-2 virus (which causes COVID-19) in the laboratory. (2020-08-27)

Princeton labs report new platform for stereocontrol
Princeton Chemistry labs collaborate to demonstrate the ability of photoredox catalysis to take traditionally static stereocenters and render them dynamic by continuously and controllably breaking and re-forming molecular bonds. (2020-08-27)

Ageing heart cells offer clues to susceptibility of older people to severe COVID-19
Genes that play an important role in allowing SARS-CoV-2 to invade heart cells become more active with age, according to research published today in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. The findings could help explain why age is major risk factor for dying from COVID-19, with people over 70 years at greatest risk, and why the disease can cause heart complications in severe cases, including heart failure and inflammation of the heart. (2020-08-18)

PLOS special collection launch
On August 12 2020, a Special Collection of articles addressing how to improve access to safe, quality medicines in East Africa by simplifying the regulatory processes in the region was published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. The five articles in the collection all look at how the East African Community (EAC)'s Medicines Regulatory Harmonization (MRH) initiative has aimed to solve this challenge over the past 8 years and what the future of the initiative is. (2020-08-12)

Radboudumc research leads to simplified dosage of HIV medicine for children
Children living with HIV can benefit from an adapted, simpler combination therapy. It is now clear that the use of one, widely available, pill of dolutegravir in children yields equally good treatment results as a combination of several, less readily available pills of that drug. Especially in countries where the number of infections is high and good care is less accessible, this makes it easier to treat children. These results are included in the World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines. (2020-08-04)

Women skip medications more in the US than other countries
For patients, especially those living with chronic conditions, nonadherence to prescription medicines due to cost is a common problem. By not filling prescriptions, skipping doses, delaying refills, or splitting pills, patients risk compromising the therapeutic benefit of their treatments. To understand the extent of this problem, researchers studied survey data from 11 high-income countries. They found that the largest disparities for non-adherence occurred among younger women in the U.S. (2020-08-03)

A plot twist in pharmaceuticals: Single nanoparticles could pave the way for medicines on demand
For the first time, a single, twisted nanoparticle has been accurately measured and characterised in a lab, taking scientists one vital step closer to a time when medicines will be produced and blended on a microscopic scale. (2020-07-20)

TARA biosystems demonstrates in vitro cardiac biology model mimics human drug response
TARA Biosystems today reported study results demonstrating the ability of TARA's in vitro human cardiac models to reproduce drug responses similar to those observed in humans. (2020-07-07)

Injections are two-and-a-half times safer when nurses use revamped guidelines
Injections are two-and-a-half times safer when nurses use revamped guidelines. (2020-07-06)

Plant study challenges tropics' reputation as site of modern evolutionary innovation
In a surprise twist, a major group of flowering plants is evolving twice as quickly in temperate zones as the tropics. (2020-07-06)

New light-based method for faster and 'green' production of building blocks for medicines
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), the Netherlands have developed a new method to convert gaseous, low-weight hydrocarbons into more complex molecules by illuminating the hydrocarbons with light in the presence of a suitable catalyst. (2020-07-02)

Why don't confused patients call medicines helplines after discharge from hospital?
Research from the University of Bath in the UK suggests the best medicine-related support comes from hospital pharmacists, yet few discharged patients use helplines set up for this purpose. (2020-07-01)

Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines
Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life. (2020-06-24)

Predicting side effects
Scientists develop AI-based tool to predict adverse drug events. Such events are responsible for some 2 million U.S. hospitalizations per year. The free, open-source system could enable safer drug design, optimize drug safety (2020-06-18)

NMDA receptors may link psychosis and sleep deficits
Sofya Kulikova, a researcher at HSE University in Perm, is part of an international research team that has discovered potential mechanisms that explain the sleep spindle deficit in electroencephalograms (EEG) of people with schizophrenia. The article was published in the Schizophrenia Research on June 5. (2020-06-05)

Research tackles hidden 'tablet overload' as COVID isolation fears grow
New research provides a roadmap to help the millions of older Britons struggling with 'shopping lists' of medication, as fears grow that the current coronavirus lockdown could be further isolating the most vulnerable. (2020-06-04)

Publication in Nature Communications highlights the preclinical development of SYNB1891
Synlogic today announced the publication in Nature Communications of preclinical data supporting its first clinical immuno-oncology program, SYNB1891, which is being evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma. (2020-06-01)

A small twist leads to a big reaction
In proteins, amino acids are held together by amide bonds. These bonds are long-lived and are robust against changes in temperature, acidity or alkalinity. Certain medicines make use of reactions involving amide bonds, but the bonds are so strong they actually slow down reactions, impeding the effectiveness of the medicines. Researchers devised a way to modify amide bonds with a twist to their chemical structure that speeds up reactions by 14 times. (2020-05-28)

How preserve the properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments?
A new technique preserves the anti-carcinogenic properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments. The research opens the door to developing more natural drugs that are less toxic for patients with cancer. The results of this study led by researchers from the URV have been published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-05-27)

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