Current Food Insecurity News and Events

Current Food Insecurity News and Events, Food Insecurity News Articles.
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Study reveals precarious employment on the rise long before COVID-19
A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher uses a new approach to measure precarious, or low-quality, employment in the United States. And, according to those findings, precarious employment has increased 9% between 1988 and 2016. Precarious employment, or P.E., is defined as low-quality employment, which is often characterized by low wages, job insecurity and irregular hours, making employment risky and stressful for the worker. (2021-01-27)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Race plays a role in children's food allergies
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than white children, confirming that race plays an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found. (2021-01-26)

Food insecurity spiked during early months of pandemic
Food insecurity grew by nearly 80 percent in two African American neighborhoods during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, erasing nearly a decade of progress in closing disparities between the communities and the national at large. (2021-01-21)

Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects. Shraddhanand Shukla and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Climate Hazards Center, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 20, 2021. (2021-01-20)

Eating habits partly down to your genetics, finds new study
Your food intake patterns are partly under genetic control, according to the latest research from researchers at King's College London, published today in the journal Twin Research and Human Genetics. (2021-01-19)

Ohio State-led support program suggests a reduction in preterm birth and infant mortality
New research suggests a unique program called Moms2B at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows a reduction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by these public health issues. (2021-01-19)

Scientists to global policymakers: Treat fish as food to help solve world hunger
Fish provide 17% of the animal protein consumed globally and are rich in micronutrients and essential fatty acids. In Ambio experts argue seeing fish in a food system perspective. (2021-01-19)

Land deals meant to improve food security may have hurt
Large-scale land acquisitions by foreign investors, intended to improve global food security, had little to no benefit, increasing crop production in some areas while simultaneously threatening local food security in others, according to Notre Dame researchers who studied their effects. (2021-01-19)

Protected areas vulnerable to growing emphasis on food security
New study shows croplands are prevalent in protected areas, challenging their efficacy in meeting conservation goals. (2021-01-19)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows. (2021-01-15)

Overactive food quality control system triggers food allergies, Yale scientists say
In a paper published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, four Yale immunobiologists propose an expanded explanation for the rise of food allergies -- the exaggerated activation of our food quality control system, a complex and highly evolved program designed to protect us against eating harmful foods. (2021-01-14)

Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record -- and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs from the past. (2021-01-14)

Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insufficiency, the most extreme form of food insecurity, occurs when families do not have enough food to eat. Among the nationally representative sample of 63,674 adults in the US, Black and Latino Americans had over twice the risk of food insufficiency compared to White Americans. (2021-01-12)

School nutrition professionals' employee safety experiences during onset of the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, explores real-time personal and employee safety experiences and perspectives of school nutrition professionals ranging from frontline staff to state leadership across the United States during the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic. (2021-01-07)

Study finds rising rates of food insecurity among older adults
From 2007 to 2016, food insecurity -- or limited access to nutritious foods because of a lack of financial resources -- increased significantly from 5.5% to 12.4% among older US adults, and the increase was more pronounced among individuals with lower income. The findings come from a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. (2021-01-06)

Protecting the global food supply chain
The University of Delaware's Kyle Davis led a collaborative effort to research how to protect food chains from environmental shocks--everything from floods, droughts, and extreme heat to other phenomena like natural hazards, pests, disease, algal blooms, and coral bleaching. (2021-01-05)

Experts agree on new global definition of 'fermented foods'
Interdisciplinary scientists have come together to create the first international consensus definition of fermented foods. Their paper, published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, defines fermented foods as: ''foods made through desired microbial growth and enzymatic conversions of food components''. (2021-01-05)

Bacteriophage has important role in agriculture and aquaculture
Crop plants and animals can be infected by bacterial pathogens that reduce yield, cause food wastage, and carry human pathogens that spread disease on consumption. Bacteriophage can play an important role in microbial control (2021-01-04)

Current food production systems could mean far-reaching habitat loss
The global food system could drive rapid and widespread biodiversity loss if not changed, new research has found. (2020-12-21)

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious. (2020-12-15)

Discovering gaps in food safety practices of small Texas farms
A survey of small farmers in Texas identifies a significant gap in food safety protocols and resources, increasing the risk of produce contamination and foodborne illness. Very few small growers - most of whom are not required to follow federal food safety guidelines - have previous food safety training, according to the study. (2020-12-15)

An alternate savanna
When civil war broke out in Mozambique more than 40 years ago, it largely spelled doom for animals in Gorongosa National Park, a 1,500-square-mile reserve on the floor of the southern end of the Great African Rift Valley, in the heart of the country. As the decades-long fighting spilled over into the reserve, many of the creatures became casualties of the conflict. (2020-12-14)

Kids gain weight when new convenience stores open nearby
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that changes in the food environment around low-income and high-ethnic/racial minority populations over time impact childhood obesity. Increased availability of small grocery stores selling a selection of healthy items in close proximity to children's homes improves their weight status over time, whereas increased availability of convenience stores selling predominantly unhealthy foods is likely to be detrimental. (2020-12-10)

Dartmouth researchers work to reduce child-directed food marketing on educational websites
A new article, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine by a by a team of researchers and advocates including Dartmouth faculty, asserts that current gaps in the regulation of commercial educational websites are exposing children to unhealthy food marketing. The group is working with major food companies and the USDA to limit these practices. (2020-12-10)

Roadmap offers solutions for future of food, global ag innovation
To deflect future world food crises created by climate change, a Cornell University-led international group has created a road map for global agricultural and food systems innovation. (2020-12-10)

Nutrigenomics: new frontiers
Plant omics and food engineering offer novel perspectives and value to sustainable agriculture and ecological sciences (2020-12-10)

What are schools doing to feed students during COVID-19-related closures?
As schools across the United States are grappling with remote and hybrid learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, investigates the initial responses of child nutrition administrative agencies in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia (DC), five US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education (BIE). (2020-12-08)

SMART researchers design portable device for fast detection of plant stress
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) have designed a portable optical sensor that allows rapid monitoring of plant stress - a new tool to help farmers and plant scientists with early diagnosis and real-time plant health monitoring in field conditions. SMART's discovery is a useful tool in precision agriculture to improve crop yield through sustainable farming. (2020-12-08)

Infant health inequality has increased since 2010, study finds
After decades of narrowing gaps in health between infants born to the most and least advantaged American mothers, infant health inequality is increasing, portending a rise in health and social inequity that could last for decades. (2020-12-08)

Mailman School experts contribute to new Lancet report on health and climate change
Unless we take urgent action to tackle climate change, we can expect an ever-hotter world that threatens global health, disrupts lives and livelihoods and overwhelms healthcare systems, according to The Lancet's Global Countdown on Health and Climate Change, a comprehensive global analysis tracking the impact of climate change on human health across 41 key indicators. (2020-12-04)

Household-grown food leads to improved health for children
Children grow taller in rural households where their mothers are supported to grow their own food - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The research, which looked at households in low- and middle-income countries, showed growing their own food helped mothers to prevent stunting, wasting and underweight in their children. Their children's food was more varied, meaning they had access to different classes of food nutrients. (2020-12-03)

Study reveals unintended impact of conversation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people. The research, conducted by scientists at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions (COS) and University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, with partners in Palau and economists in Italy and the UK, shows that the PNMS policies which restrict industrial offshore fishing could drive up offshore fish prices and, in turn, increase tourists' consumption of reef fish. (2020-11-30)

Covid-19 shutdowns disproportionately affected low-income black households
Princeton University researchers now report that low-income Black households experienced greater job loss, more food and medicine insecurity, and higher indebtedness in the early months of #COVID19 compared to white or Latinx low-income households. (2020-11-30)

Link found between drought and HIV among women in less-developed countries
Lehigh University Professor Kelly Austin explores the consequences of drought and lack of environmental resources on women in less-developed countries. The research shows the direct and indirect associations to women's percentage of HIV. (2020-11-30)

Landmark study generates first genomic atlas for global wheat improvement
In a landmark discovery for global wheat production, a University of Saskatchewan-led international team has sequenced the genomes for 15 wheat varieties representing breeding programs around the world, enabling scientists and breeders to much more quickly identify influential genes for improved yield, pest resistance and other important crop traits. (2020-11-25)

COVID-19 second wave in Myanmar causes dramatic increases in poverty
New evidence combining surveys from urban and rural Myanmar and simulation analysis find COVID-19 second wave dramatically increasing poverty and food insecurity. (2020-11-24)

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