Current Food Safety News and Events

Current Food Safety News and Events, Food Safety News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

Texas A&M researchers discover energy drinks' harmful effects on heart
A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart. (2021-02-10)

'Handy pen' lights up when exposed to nerve gas or spoiled food vapors
Exposure to some odorless, colorless and tasteless gases, such as nerve agents, can be toxic or even lethal. And having the ability to detect other types of vapors could save people from eating spoiled or rotten food. Easy-to-use portable devices could, therefore, go a long way toward protecting the public. Now researchers reporting in ACS Materials Letters have created a pen-like sensor that changes color when exposed to harmful gases. (2021-02-10)

Electric cable bacteria breathe oxygen with unheard efficiency
Electric cable bacteria breathe oxygen with unheard efficiency. Ten years ago, researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, reported the discovery of centimeter-long cable bacteria, that live by conducting an electric current from one end to the other. Now the researchers document that a few cells operate with extremely high oxygen consumption while the rest of the cells process food and grow without oxygen. An outstanding way of life. (2021-02-10)

The invisible killer lurking in our consumer products
Our consumer products, such as food, cosmetics and clothes, might be filled with nanomaterials - unbeknownst to us. The use of nanomaterials remains unregulated and they do not show up in lists of ingredients. A new study published in Nature Communications sheds light on whether they are harmful and what happens to them when they enter an organism. (2021-02-09)

Peanut allergy affects even more U.S. adults than children
Peanut allergy affects at least 4.5 million adults in the U.S., many of whom report developing their first allergy symptoms during adulthood. Although three out of four Americans with peanut allergy are over 17 years old, peanut allergy is often considered a predominantly pediatric concern. There are currently no FDA-approved therapies for patients with adult-onset food allergy. (2021-02-09)

Home office: Majority supports the new regulation
The occupational health and safety regulation regarding the coronavirus has been in effect throughout Germany since the end of January. It requires companies to offer their employees the opportunity to work from home, as far as their work permits. As the results of the 28th edition of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), show, the regulation meets with the approval of the majority of the population. (2021-02-09)

Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate
Early exposure to nutritious foods may help children develop more healthful eating habits, but package labels can make it difficult for parents to understand what they are feeding their young children, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-08)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Gap between the 'haves' and 'have nots' widened by the COVID pandemic, an IU study found
A new study by Indiana University found women, younger individuals, those with lower levels of formal education, and people of color are being hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-05)

Sweden ahead of Denmark in the public sector organic food race
Sweden takes first, Denmark second and Norway lags at the bottom when it comes to how much organic food is served in canteens, kindergartens and other public sector workplaces across the three Nordic nations. This, according to the results of a new report by the University of Copenhagen. The report details plenty of potential for expanding the conversion to organic food service in the Danish public sector--a topic of discussion across the EU at the moment. (2021-02-04)

Spicy perfection isn't to prevent infection
Spicy food is considered an example of ''Darwinian gastronomy'': selection for antimicrobial ingredients to counter infection risk. By analysing over thirty thousand recipes, we show that average number of spices per recipe is more strongly associated with socioeconomic factors than infectious disease. (2021-02-04)

States with more gun laws have lower youth gun violence, Rutgers study finds
Gun violence among children is lower in states with more gun laws, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2021-02-04)

Ensuring healthy family mealtimes is important - and complicated
Mealtimes are a central aspect of family life, affecting the health and wellbeing of both children and adults. Although the benefits of healthy mealtimes are straightforward, helping all families realize those benefits is quite complicated, new research from University of Illinois shows. (2021-02-04)

Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation. (2021-02-04)

Nanotech plastic packaging could leach silver into some types of foods and beverages
Antimicrobial packaging is being developed to extend the shelf life and safety of foods and beverages. However, there is concern about the transfer of potentially harmful materials, such as silver nanoparticles, from these types of containers to consumables. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces illustrate that silver embedded in an antimicrobial plastic can leave the material and form nanoparticles in foods and beverages, particularly in sweet and sugary ones. (2021-02-03)

New technology to detect bitter almonds in real time
Incorporating NIRS technology to almond analysis allows for quantifying amygdalin levels, the compound that causes the nut's bitter taste, on an industrial scale. (2021-01-29)

COVID unemployment assistance puts food on the table: BU study
Another wave of COVID-19 is putting millions out of work, while tens of millions more remain unemployed, and Congress debates aid. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study shows that unemployment help directly translates to people being able to put food on the table. (2021-01-29)

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices
Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process. A recent study published in Nature Food shows that trade restrictions and stockpiling of supplies by a few key countries could create global food price spikes and severe local food shortages during times of threat. (2021-01-28)

The decline in grazing practices threatens the existence of a Basque cheese
Of the many different research projects in which Lactiker is involved, of particular interest is its work on the Idiazabal cheese production process, which is based on grazing. The group works with small artisan dairies, as well as with the Protected Designation of Origin; it attaches great importance to sharing its knowledge with the industry and carries out studies designed to improve yield, quality and sensory differentiation and foster the sustainability of production systems. (2021-01-28)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Corona vaccination: Approach receives approval
Anyone who belongs to a risk group, lives in a nursing home or works in healthcare is first entitled to a vaccination against the novel coronavirus. The order for vaccination protection is regulated by the national vaccination strategy. As the results of the 27th edition of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey conducted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), show, the majority of the population approves of this approach. (2021-01-26)

Race plays a role in children's food allergies
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than white children, confirming that race plays an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found. (2021-01-26)

Food insecurity spiked during early months of pandemic
Food insecurity grew by nearly 80 percent in two African American neighborhoods during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, erasing nearly a decade of progress in closing disparities between the communities and the national at large. (2021-01-21)

Study suggests coffee temporarily counteracts effect of sleep loss on cognitive function
A new study exploring the impact of repeated sleep loss during a simulated working week has found that consuming caffeinated coffee during the day helps to reduce impacts to people's vigilance, alertness, reaction-time, accuracy, working memory, attention and cognitive function, compared to decaffeinated coffee. (2021-01-21)

Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects. Shraddhanand Shukla and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Climate Hazards Center, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 20, 2021. (2021-01-20)

Eating habits partly down to your genetics, finds new study
Your food intake patterns are partly under genetic control, according to the latest research from researchers at King's College London, published today in the journal Twin Research and Human Genetics. (2021-01-19)

Fishing out the bad apples: Novel quantitative method to assess the safety of food
Histamine is a dangerous compound that occurs in spoiled food, such as mackerel, left at room temperature for too long. Unfortunately, existing histamine detection methods are inconvenient and expensive. To tackle this issue, a team of scientists from Chung-Ang University, Korea, has developed a novel histamine quantification strategy based on fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and histamine-binding peptides. Their approach is simple and inexpensive and allows one to efficiently assess food safety. (2021-01-19)

Scientists to global policymakers: Treat fish as food to help solve world hunger
Fish provide 17% of the animal protein consumed globally and are rich in micronutrients and essential fatty acids. In Ambio experts argue seeing fish in a food system perspective. (2021-01-19)

Worker safety goes beyond human error
Disasters in high-risk industries can have catastrophic environmental, financial and human safety consequences. One way these industries help prevent and mitigate disasters is formal procedures designed to standardize how work is done. These procedures typically come in the form of a written document workers use while performing a task. (2021-01-19)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows. (2021-01-15)

Overactive food quality control system triggers food allergies, Yale scientists say
In a paper published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, four Yale immunobiologists propose an expanded explanation for the rise of food allergies -- the exaggerated activation of our food quality control system, a complex and highly evolved program designed to protect us against eating harmful foods. (2021-01-14)

Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record -- and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs from the past. (2021-01-14)

Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Pulsed ultraviolet light technology to improve egg safety, help poultry industry
Pulsed ultraviolet light can be an effective alternative to some of the antimicrobial technologies now used by the poultry industry to kill pathogens on eggshells, according to Penn State researchers, who simulated production conditions to test the technology. (2021-01-13)

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insufficiency, the most extreme form of food insecurity, occurs when families do not have enough food to eat. Among the nationally representative sample of 63,674 adults in the US, Black and Latino Americans had over twice the risk of food insufficiency compared to White Americans. (2021-01-12)

Protection against corona: 82 percent ventilate more frequently
Despite cold temperatures, the population counts on fresh air to avoid contracting the coronavirus. This is shown by the results of the 26th edition of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). In all age groups, about four out of five respondents say they ventilate more frequently. (2021-01-12)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.