Current Food Safety News and Events | Page 2

Current Food Safety News and Events, Food Safety News Articles.
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University at Buffalo researchers report quantum-limit-approaching chemical sensing chip
University at Buffalo researchers are reporting an advancement of a chemical sensing chip that could lead to handheld devices that detect trace chemicals -- everything from illicit drugs to pollution -- as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol. (2021-01-11)

Fatal health threat to young African children reduced by innovative artistic intervention
The fatal threat from diarrhoea and pneumonia to young children in the world's poorer countries can be drastically reduced by using traditional performing arts to encourage mothers to provide youngsters with safe food and water, a new study reveals. (2021-01-07)

Study finds rising rates of food insecurity among older adults
From 2007 to 2016, food insecurity -- or limited access to nutritious foods because of a lack of financial resources -- increased significantly from 5.5% to 12.4% among older US adults, and the increase was more pronounced among individuals with lower income. The findings come from a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. (2021-01-06)

Protecting the global food supply chain
The University of Delaware's Kyle Davis led a collaborative effort to research how to protect food chains from environmental shocks--everything from floods, droughts, and extreme heat to other phenomena like natural hazards, pests, disease, algal blooms, and coral bleaching. (2021-01-05)

Experts agree on new global definition of 'fermented foods'
Interdisciplinary scientists have come together to create the first international consensus definition of fermented foods. Their paper, published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, defines fermented foods as: ''foods made through desired microbial growth and enzymatic conversions of food components''. (2021-01-05)

Bacteriophage has important role in agriculture and aquaculture
Crop plants and animals can be infected by bacterial pathogens that reduce yield, cause food wastage, and carry human pathogens that spread disease on consumption. Bacteriophage can play an important role in microbial control (2021-01-04)

Study: in social media safety messages, the pictures should match the words
When using social media to nudge people toward safe and healthy behaviors, it's critical to make sure the words match the pictures, according to a new study. After looking at social media posts, parents of young children were better able to recall safety messages such as how to put a baby safely to sleep when the images in the posts aligned with the messages in the text. (2020-12-31)

Americans underestimate public support for key gun policies
Gun safety policies, including universal background checks and mandatory waiting periods, receive wide support among American gun owners, yet most Americans fail to recognize this fact, a new study suggests. That disconnect may make it hard to adopt these policies, according to the researchers. (2020-12-22)

Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses. (2020-12-21)

Interventional radiology associated with an increased risk for preventable adverse events
In a review article in the journal Radiology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), suggest there is a critical need to renew understanding of adverse events and complications within interventional radiology. They also call for a robust recommitment to patient safety and quality assurance in clinical practice, continuing medical education and graduate medical education. (2020-12-17)

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili, Ph.D., George Mason University challenges the conventional, reactionary paradigm of safety-risk management (2020-12-17)

Two thirds of people with lupus would take COVID-19 vaccine, shows LRA survey
Two out of three people with lupus (64%) are willing to take a COVID-19 vaccine if it is free and determined safe by scientists according to results of a survey conducted by the Lupus Research Alliance (LRA). (2020-12-16)

Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies not following the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a new study. (2020-12-16)

Coronavirus pandemic: Entering the Christmas season with caution
This year, the pre-Christmas season is accompanied by discussions about a possible strict lockdown. This does not leave the population in Germany unaffected. This is shown by the results of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey conducted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). For example, the acceptance of the measures of the ''Lockdown Light'', which has been ongoing since the beginning of November, has in some cases significantly increased in the past two weeks. (2020-12-15)

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious. (2020-12-15)

Discovering gaps in food safety practices of small Texas farms
A survey of small farmers in Texas identifies a significant gap in food safety protocols and resources, increasing the risk of produce contamination and foodborne illness. Very few small growers - most of whom are not required to follow federal food safety guidelines - have previous food safety training, according to the study. (2020-12-15)

Dartmouth researchers work to reduce child-directed food marketing on educational websites
A new article, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine by a by a team of researchers and advocates including Dartmouth faculty, asserts that current gaps in the regulation of commercial educational websites are exposing children to unhealthy food marketing. The group is working with major food companies and the USDA to limit these practices. (2020-12-10)

Roadmap offers solutions for future of food, global ag innovation
To deflect future world food crises created by climate change, a Cornell University-led international group has created a road map for global agricultural and food systems innovation. (2020-12-10)

Nutrigenomics: new frontiers
Plant omics and food engineering offer novel perspectives and value to sustainable agriculture and ecological sciences (2020-12-10)

New method for evaluating vaccine safety
A research group at the University of Turku, Finland, has led the development of a new method to evaluate vaccine safety. The new method may significantly reduce the use of animal testing in the vaccine industry. (2020-12-08)

Seizing military weapons does not increase violent crime nor risk police safety
More local law enforcement agencies are using military equipment, such as tear gas, armored vehicles and rubber bullets, to handle social justice protests--calling into question police militarization. (2020-12-07)

Advancing gene editing with new CRISPR/Cas9 variant
Researchers report the ability to improve safety and efficacy using a CRISPR-Cas9 variant known as miCas9. (2020-12-03)

Household-grown food leads to improved health for children
Children grow taller in rural households where their mothers are supported to grow their own food - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The research, which looked at households in low- and middle-income countries, showed growing their own food helped mothers to prevent stunting, wasting and underweight in their children. Their children's food was more varied, meaning they had access to different classes of food nutrients. (2020-12-03)

SMART researchers develop plant nanobionic sensor to monitor arsenic levels in soil
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) have developed -- for the first time -- a novel type of plant nanobionic optical sensor that can, in real-time, detect and monitor arsenic levels in the belowground environment, with significant advantages over conventional methods used to measure arsenic in the environment. The new sensor will improve arsenic detection and will help safeguard food safety, and will be useful for agricultural research and environmental monitoring. (2020-12-02)

No nanoparticle risks found in field tests of spray sunscreens
People can continue using mineral-based aerosol sunscreens without fear of exposure to dangerous levels of nanoparticles or other respirable particulates, according to Penn State research published in the journal Aerosol Science and Engineering. (2020-12-02)

After shipping, pallets pose big risk to public, cause many accidents, injuries
Shipping pallets -- often used as display platforms in retail settings or seen as raw material for household projects -- were responsible for sending more than 30,000 people to the emergency rooms of U.S. hospitals over a recent five-year period, according to a new study. (2020-12-02)

Study reveals unintended impact of conversation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people. The research, conducted by scientists at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions (COS) and University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, with partners in Palau and economists in Italy and the UK, shows that the PNMS policies which restrict industrial offshore fishing could drive up offshore fish prices and, in turn, increase tourists' consumption of reef fish. (2020-11-30)

Link found between drought and HIV among women in less-developed countries
Lehigh University Professor Kelly Austin explores the consequences of drought and lack of environmental resources on women in less-developed countries. The research shows the direct and indirect associations to women's percentage of HIV. (2020-11-30)

Chia, goji & co. -- BfR consumer monitor special superfoods
Chia seeds, goji berries or quinoa -- 48% of the population see so-called 'superfoods' as part of a health-conscious diet. This is shown by a recent representative survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). (2020-11-25)

Pesticide deadly to bees now easily detected in honey
A common insecticide that is a major hazard for honeybees is now effectively detected in honey thanks to a simple new method. (2020-11-24)

Social needs linked to low health-related quality of life among African American cancer survivors
Social needs--such as food and economic insecurity, poor housing and neighborhood conditions, and lack of access to transportation--were common in a group of African American cancer survivors in Detroit, and they were associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-11-23)

Food, housing insecurities may delay breast cancer diagnosis
Women who experience food or housing insecurity may be at risk for undiagnosed breast cancer due to lapses in follow-up appointments, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-19)

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 via pork meat unlikely according to current state of knowledge
State media in China have claimed that a worker has become infected with the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) from a knuckle of pork imported from Germany. The infection is reported to have taken place in a cold store. Traces of SARS-CoV-2 were detected on packaging as well as on a door knob. (2020-11-19)

College students are less food insecure than non-students
College students are significantly less likely to be food insecure than non-students in the same age group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois. (2020-11-19)

The timeless, complimentary taste of oysters and champagne -- explained
Matching prices aren't the only reason oysters and champagne pair so well. According to a study published by the University of Copenhagen today, an uncanny umami synergy makes the combination of yeast-brewed bubbly and fresh molluscs a match made in heaven for some. Ironically, the new knowledge could help us consume more vegetables in the future. (2020-11-18)

Comprehensive safety testing of COVID-19 vaccines based on experience with prior vaccines
'The urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines must be balanced with the imperative of ensuring safety and public confidence in vaccines by following the established clinical safety testing protocols throughout vaccine development, including both pre- and post-deployment,' write David M. Knipe and colleagues in this Perspective. (2020-11-17)

Changes to the brain's reward system may drive overeating in mice
A combination of innate differences and diet-induced changes to the reward system may predispose some mice to overeat, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-16)

Nearly one in five parents of food-allergic children are bullied
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting shows that nearly one in five parents of food-allergic kids are the target of bullying by a multitude of sources. (2020-11-13)

Food allergies take a greater emotional toll on Asian families
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting reveals the impact on food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for Asian patients and their parents is significantly higher than for other races. (2020-11-13)

Diet affects skin gene expression in both healthy and atopic dogs
Differences in skin gene expression were observed between healthy and atopic Staffordshire Bull Terriers as well as between dogs that ate either dry food or raw food. Raw food appeared to activate the skin's immune system as well as the expression of genes that increase antioxidant production or have anti-inflammatory effects. (2020-11-13)

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