Current Food Waste News and Events

Current Food Waste News and Events, Food Waste News Articles.
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Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

A salt solution for desalinating brine
Solar-powered brine crystallization could alleviate the environmental impacts of seawater desalination. (2021-02-21)

Global study of 48 cities finds nature sanitizes 41.7 million tons of human waste a year
Researchers found that nature provides at least 18% of sanitation services in 48 cities worldwide, according to researchers in the United Kingdom and India. The study, published February 19 in the journal One Earth, estimates that more than 2 million cubic meters of the cities' human waste is processed each year without engineered infrastructure. This includes pit latrine waste that gradually filters through the soil--a natural process that cleans it before it reaches groundwater. (2021-02-19)

What impact will robots and autonomous systems have on urban ecosystems?
Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones), autonomous cars, robots that can repair urban infrastructure and wireless sensor networks used for monitoring, etc. are just some of the devices that will spring up all over our cities in a few years. They have a wide range of potential applications, such as autonomous transport, waste collection, infrastructure maintenance and repair, surveillance and precision agriculture, among others. However, we must also consider the impact these technologies will have on urban biodiversity and its ecosystems in the future. (2021-02-19)

UNEP synthesis of scientific assessments provides blueprint to secure humanity's future
The UN Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNEP launch ''Making Peace with Nature,'' a year-long synthesis of major UN scientific assessments. This summary underscores the level of emergency documented and reveals an intersection of common conclusions that clearly identify core policy change priorities. The new report also prescribes priority actions required of every major segment of society, from governments and the private sector to the general public, to begin making peace with Nature. (2021-02-18)

Waste into wealth: Harvesting useful products from microbial growth
Anca Delgado, a researcher in the Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology at Arizona State University, has been exploring how bacteria can convert organic waste into useful products. In a new study, she describes for the first time how the chain elongation processes are carried out by microorganisms under normal conditions in soil. (2021-02-17)

Play and meaty food reduce hunting by cats
Domestic cats hunt wildlife less if owners play with them daily and feed them a meat-rich food, new research shows. (2021-02-11)

Recommendations for regional action to combat marine plastic pollution
Millions of tonnes of plastic waste find their way into the ocean every year. A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam has investigated the role of regional ocean governance in the fight against marine plastic pollution, highlighting why regional marine governance should be further strengthened as negotiations for a new global agreement continue. (2021-02-11)

Electric cable bacteria breathe oxygen with unheard efficiency
Electric cable bacteria breathe oxygen with unheard efficiency. Ten years ago, researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, reported the discovery of centimeter-long cable bacteria, that live by conducting an electric current from one end to the other. Now the researchers document that a few cells operate with extremely high oxygen consumption while the rest of the cells process food and grow without oxygen. An outstanding way of life. (2021-02-10)

Peanut allergy affects even more U.S. adults than children
Peanut allergy affects at least 4.5 million adults in the U.S., many of whom report developing their first allergy symptoms during adulthood. Although three out of four Americans with peanut allergy are over 17 years old, peanut allergy is often considered a predominantly pediatric concern. There are currently no FDA-approved therapies for patients with adult-onset food allergy. (2021-02-09)

Researching ways to improve sustainability and reduce waste in the seafood industry
Nutritionists have been touting the health benefits of seafood for years. But the push to increase our consumption of seafood can put a strain on the seafood industry and create more waste. The research found points of waste reduction regarding sea life and fish, but the model also introduced other points of waste that didn't exist before, including plastic packaging. ASU researcher Lekelia Jenkins believes those points of waste need to be addressed but were small compared to how the model improved sustainability. (2021-02-09)

Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate
Early exposure to nutritious foods may help children develop more healthful eating habits, but package labels can make it difficult for parents to understand what they are feeding their young children, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-08)

Half of global wastewater treated, rates in developing countries still lagging
A new study by scientists at Utrecht University and the United Nations University concludes that about half of global wastewater is treated, rather than the previous estimate of 20%. Despite this promising finding, the authors warn that treatment rates in developing countries are still very low. The study and its dataset were published Open Access in the journal Earth System Science Data. (2021-02-08)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Tourism mainly responsible for marine litter on Mediterranean beaches
A study by the ICTA-UAB warns that tourism generates 80% of the marine litter accumulating on the beaches of the Mediterranean islands in summer. For researchers, the global COVID19 pandemic may be an opportunity to rethink the model of sustainable tourism. (2021-02-08)

Sweden ahead of Denmark in the public sector organic food race
Sweden takes first, Denmark second and Norway lags at the bottom when it comes to how much organic food is served in canteens, kindergartens and other public sector workplaces across the three Nordic nations. This, according to the results of a new report by the University of Copenhagen. The report details plenty of potential for expanding the conversion to organic food service in the Danish public sector--a topic of discussion across the EU at the moment. (2021-02-04)

Spicy perfection isn't to prevent infection
Spicy food is considered an example of ''Darwinian gastronomy'': selection for antimicrobial ingredients to counter infection risk. By analysing over thirty thousand recipes, we show that average number of spices per recipe is more strongly associated with socioeconomic factors than infectious disease. (2021-02-04)

Ensuring healthy family mealtimes is important - and complicated
Mealtimes are a central aspect of family life, affecting the health and wellbeing of both children and adults. Although the benefits of healthy mealtimes are straightforward, helping all families realize those benefits is quite complicated, new research from University of Illinois shows. (2021-02-04)

Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation. (2021-02-04)

A revolutionary approach to increasing crop yield in rice
Overexpression of a plasma membrane proton pump gene in rice increases nutrient uptake and stomatal opening, promising solutions to food supply and environmental problems. (2021-02-03)

From waste heat to electrical power: A new generation of thermomagnetic generators
Use of waste heat contributes largely to sustainable energy supply. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and T?hoku University in Japan have now come much closer to their goal of converting waste heat into electrical power at small temperature differences. As reported in Joule, electrical power per footprint of thermomagnetic generators based on Heusler alloy films has been increased by a factor of 3.4. (DOI: 10.1016/j.joule.2020.10.019) (2021-02-03)

New clues to how muscle wasting occurs in people with cancer
Muscle wasting, or the loss of muscle tissue, is a common problem for people with cancer, but the precise mechanisms have long eluded doctors and scientists. Now, a new study led by Penn State researchers gives new clues to how muscle wasting happens on a cellular level. (2021-02-03)

Recycling face masks into roads to tackle COVID-generated waste
Researchers have developed a new road-making material that mixes shredded single-use face masks with processed building rubble. Their analysis shows making just 1km of a 2-lane road with the material would enable 3 million face masks to be recycled and kept out of landfill. (2021-02-02)

NREL reports sustainability benchmarks for plastics recycling and redesign
Researchers developing renewable plastics and exploring new processes for plastics upcycling and recycling technologies will now be able to easily baseline their efforts to current manufacturing practices to understand if their efforts will save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Benchmark data calculated and compiled at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a measurement -- at the supply chain level -- of how much energy is required and the amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the production of a variety of plastics in the United States. (2021-02-02)

Algorithm for algal rhythms
Red Sea atlas of algal blooms reveals the need for more sustainable fish farming. (2021-01-31)

Human activity caused the long-term growth of greenhouse gas methane
Decadal growth rate of methane in the atmosphere varied dramatically over the past 30 yeas with three distinct periods of slowed (1988-1998), quasi-stationary (1999-2006) and renewed (2007-2016) phases. An inverse analysis with atmospheric chemistry transport modeling explained these variations consistently. While emissions from oil and gas exploitation and natural climate events caused the slowed growth and the temporary pause, those from coal mining in China and livestock farming in the tropics drove the renewed growth. (2021-01-29)

COVID unemployment assistance puts food on the table: BU study
Another wave of COVID-19 is putting millions out of work, while tens of millions more remain unemployed, and Congress debates aid. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study shows that unemployment help directly translates to people being able to put food on the table. (2021-01-29)

Turning food waste back into food
UC Riverside scientists have discovered fermented food waste can boost bacteria that increase crop growth, making plants more resistant to pathogens and reducing carbon emissions from farming. (2021-01-28)

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices
Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process. A recent study published in Nature Food shows that trade restrictions and stockpiling of supplies by a few key countries could create global food price spikes and severe local food shortages during times of threat. (2021-01-28)

Drugs used to treat HIV and flu can have detrimental impact on crops
Scientists from the UK and Kenya found that lettuce plants exposed to a higher concentration of four commonly-used antiviral and antiretroviral medicines could be more than a third smaller in biomass than those grown in a drug-free environment. (2021-01-28)

A mild way to upcycle plastics used in bottles into fuel and other high-value products
Plastic is ubiquitous in people's lives. Yet, when plastic-containing items have fulfilled their missions, only a small amount is recycled into new products, which are often of lower quality compared to the original material. And, transforming this waste into high-value chemicals requires substantial energy. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' JACS Au have combined a ruthenium-carbon catalyst and mild, lower-energy reaction conditions to convert plastics used in bottles and other packaging into fuels and chemical feedstock. (2021-01-27)

Up-trending farming and landscape disruptions threaten Paris climate agreement goals
UC Irvine Earth system science researchers conducted an analysis of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land use since 1961, finding some opportunities for mitigation as well as areas where curtailment will require sacrifices. (2021-01-27)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Biodegradable displays for sustainable electronics
Increasing use of electronic devices in consumables and new technologies for the internet of things are increasing the amount of electronic scrap. To save resources and minimize waste volumes, an eco-friendlier production and more sustainable lifecycle will be needed. Scientists of KIT have now been the first to produce displays, whose biodegradability has been checked and certified by an independent office. The results are reported in the Journal of Materials Chemistry. (DOI: 10.1039/d0tc04627b) (2021-01-26)

Mangroves threatened by plastic pollution from rivers, new study finds
Mangrove ecosystems are at particular risk of being polluted by plastic carried from rivers to the sea. Fifty-four per cent of mangrove habitat is within 20 km of a river that discharges more than a tonne of plastic waste a year into the ocean, according to a new paper published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. Mangroves in southeast Asia are especially threatened by river-borne plastic pollution, the researchers found. (2021-01-26)

Race plays a role in children's food allergies
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than white children, confirming that race plays an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found. (2021-01-26)

Efficient solid-state depolymerization of waste PET
Despite significant methodological and technological advancements in chemical recycling of synthetic polymers, an effective mechanochemical PET degradation has not yet been described in the scientific literature, until now! Vjekoslav Štrukil from the Rudjer Boskovic Institute (RBI), Zagreb, Croatia, found that the challenging breakdown of waste PET under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure can be achieved by mechanochemical ball milling or vapor-assisted aging. (2021-01-25)

Abandoned cropland should produce biofuels
More biofuels are needed to counteract climate change. But producing them shouldn't diminish food production or wilderness areas. The solution may be to grow more grass on recently abandoned cropland. (2021-01-21)

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