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Maryland chemist wins national award for radioisotope studies
Chemist William Walters of College Park, Md., will be honored April 3 for insights into the nuclei of radioactive compounds, some of which can be used to study supernovas. He will receive the Award for Nuclear Chemistry from the American Chemical Society at its 221st national meeting in San Diego. (2001-04-03)

Sports injury rates rising among baby boomers, Yale physician reports
While many baby boomers-people between the ages of 37 and 55- are exercising more, many end up in hospital emergency rooms suffering from sports related injuries, according to Yale orthopaedic surgeon, Robert A. Stanton, M.D., who wants to raise awareness about this growing problem and offer preventative strategies. (2001-01-25)

Penn's Head Injury Center receives $110,000 NFL charities grant to study long-term effects of concussions
Physical contact is a part of every football game, but few things can sideline an otherwise healthy athlete faster than a concussion. To study the long-term effects of concussions, NFL Charities has awarded a $110, 000 grant to the Head Injury Center of the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. (2001-01-23)

Carnegie Mellon Professor's unique new vision technology will be used to present replays in Super Bowl XXXV
CBS will use a new technology to present replays during the Super Bowl. Eye Vision, as CBS calls it, was developed by the network and Carnegie Mellon University computer vision expert Takeo Kanade. Multiple cameras shoot views from diverse angles, giving viwers the sense of flying over the scene. (2001-01-22)

Cultural industries can do more for cities
Britain's second cities could boost regeneration if their political and business leaders made the new cultural industries more central to policy, says a new ESRC-funded study. These cultural industries, such as fashion, design, new media and music, could help breathe new life into city centres. (2001-01-03)

Important sporting events can trigger heart attacks in men
Men are more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke on the day of important sporting events, probably because of increased stress, claim researchers from The Netherlands in this week's Christmas issue of the BMJ. (2000-12-21)

Important sporting events can trigger heart attacks in men
Men are more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke on the day of important sporting events, probably because of increased stress, claim researchers from The Netherlands in this week's Christmas issue of the BMJ. (2000-12-20)

Young users of smokeless tobacco lack awareness of its dangers
Smokeless tobacco users have less awareness of the dangers of their habit than non-users, according to a survey of West Virginia public school students. (2000-12-17)

More study needed on creatine use among athletes, Mayo Clinic reports
Based on their recently completed survey of high school athletes, Mayo Clinic doctors are recommending a large-scale study on the use and long-term effects of creatine, a supplement used by athletes who believe it enhances athletic performance. (2000-12-11)

Scientists discover new stage in malarial infection
Researchers have identified a previously unknown step that enables the malaria parasite to spread in the bloodstream. And they have found a way to block this key event. The findings, reported in the Dec. 12 online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may lead to promising targets for drug development. (2000-12-10)

Contaminated health supplement makes athletes test positive for steroid use, UCLA researchers discover
Athletes hoping to boost their performance with an over-the- counter dietary supplement known as (2000-11-27)

Sick athletes passed virus to opponents, N.C. medical detective work revealed
As expected, Florida State University beat Duke University in football on Sept. 19, 1998, but the Blue Devils got a bit of unintentional revenge. Duke players, many of whom suffered from gastroenteritis before, during and after the game, passed on the illness to their Florida rivals in a possibly unique case of disease transmission. (2000-10-24)

Playing professional football can be bad for health
Professional footballers are prone to ill health and disability in later life, finds research in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.Joint disease was particularly common, the study showed. (2000-10-02)

New study: football players with concussion three times more likely to suffer another one
Football players who suffer the dangerous head injury known as concussion are three times more likely than other players to suffer a second concussion in the same season, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. (2000-09-05)

New study finds 18 football players died in 1999 season, eight paralyzed
Six high school football players died from injuries suffered on the playing field in 1999, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. (2000-08-13)

Concussions may spell later trouble for football players
SAN DIEGO, CA - The first scientific survey of head injuries in professional football players suggests that head trauma from the sport may lead to later neurological problems. (2000-05-03)

OHSU researchers show drug education prevents use
Results from a three-year study of high school football players shows decreased use of anabolic steroids, alcohol and illicit drugs after participation in a team-centered education program. Oregon Health Sciences University researchers say the program also resulted in improved nutrition behaviors and enhanced self-esteem. (2000-04-10)

90 high schools will participate in UNC-CH head injury study
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are trying to make sports safer. Soon they may be able to take some of the guesswork out of how to handle head trauma. They have received two grants totaling $531,000 to support a two-year investigation of such injuries in games and practices. (1999-12-02)

As key neural circuits weaken with age, our brains call upon alternate pathways to pick up the slack, study says
New research from Brandeis University indicates that when the human brain's important neural circuits no longer work as well as they should - a normal side effect of aging - the brain can compensate by calling upon substitute circuits to pitch in. The finding suggests that our brains may constantly reorganize themselves throughout our lives in an effort to ensure peak mental performance. (1999-10-24)

First link demonstrated between multiple concussions, neuropsychological deficits in college athletes
College football players who sustain multiple concussions are at risk for a decline in long-term neuropsychological function. And players with a pre-existing learning disability (LD) who have sustained multiple concussions appear to have an even higher risk of permanent injury, according to an article in the Sept. 8 JAMA. (1999-09-07)

Heatstroke killed four football players during 1998, expert urges precautions
During 1998, seven football players died across the United States as a direct result of injuries suffered on the field, the study showed. Seven other players - including the heatstroke victims -- also died, but those fatalities were not directly tied to the game and could have resulted from other vigorous activities. (1999-08-02)

New medicare coverage makes TMR procedure more readily accessible to patients with severe angina and no options
Effective July 1, 1999, Medicare began reimbursement for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR), making it more readily accessible for an estimated 10 to 15 percent of patients with significant heart disease who are unsuitable for angioplasty or coronary bypass surgery. It's anticipated that other insurers will follow Medicare's lead, making the procedure more feasible for the estimated 100,000 to 200,000 patients in the U.S. who could benefit from its effects. (1999-07-06)

Better Binding Through Chemistry
Borrowing a trick from nature that makes small molecules appear larger, HHMI investigator Gerald Crabtree and colleagues at Stanford University have developed a versatile method for improving critical binding properties of potential drugs. (1999-03-02)

Chemists Find Too Much Air Sticks Precious Carbon Footballs Together
Ever since researchers discovered a form of carbon consisting of a class of miniature, football-like structures known as fullerenes, they have been racing to use the unique structures in all kinds of novel ways from drug delivery to nanotechnology. However, chemists at the Universities of Warwick and Surrey have found that there could be a major problem if these novel forms of carbon are used at normal ambient temperatures. (1998-12-16)

New Study Shows 13 High School Boys Died Pole Vaulting From 1982 To 1997
Thirteen young U.S. athletes -- all high school boys -- died from catastrophic accidents suffered while pole vaulting between fall 1982 and spring 1997, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study shows. (1998-08-11)

Six Football Players Died In 1997 Season: New Study
Six young football players - all high school students -- died across the United States last year as a direct result of injuries suffered on the field, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study shows. Eight other players also died, but those fatalities were not directly tied to the game and could have resulted from other vigorous activities. (1998-07-07)

Oak Ridge Physicists Discover New Proton-Emitting Thulium Isotope
Physicists from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have identified the shortest-lived proton emitter known--the 33rd isotope of thulium (Tm). (1998-06-25)

NCAA Conference Creates Schedule Using New Algorithm
Planning the complex schedule of games for men's college basketball has been improved through a new algorithm designed for a conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, according to an article in this month's edition of a journal published by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). (1998-03-03)

Life-Saving Dr. Mueller Selected To Get Top Sports Medicine Award
Dr. Frederick O. Mueller, professor and chairman of physical education, exercise and sport science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been named winner of the Dr. Ernst Jokl Sports Medicine Award for 1997. (1998-02-03)

Sports Scientists Say Weight Lifting Is Key In Preventing Severe Injuries
A three-year study of athlete injuries shows that players who follow a controlled strength-training program reduce their chances of suffering from severe injuries. (1997-10-23)

Study Finds Five Football Players Died In 1996 Season, Nine Paralyzed
Five high school football players died from injuries suffered on the playing field during the 1996 season, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. (1997-08-12)

New Study: Athletes Should Wait At Least 3 Days After Head Injury
Football players and other athletes who suffer mild head injuries should wait at least three days after symptoms disappear before playing again, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. (1997-08-06)

High Ankle Sprains Can Be Diagnosed More Easily, Henry Ford Researchers Conclude
DETROIT - Elusive high ankle sprains - most commonly found in athletes - usually are not seen in regular ankle x-rays, preventing the athletes from receiving proper treatment and delaying their return to activity, according to a study by Henry Ford Hospital researchers. (1996-12-05)

Successful Drug Prevention Study Reduces Anabolic Steroid Use Among High School Athletes
Scientists at Oregon Health Sciences University have designed a successful drug prevention program to help high school athletes resist the temptation to take anabolic steroids. Their findings appear in the Nov. 20, 1996 issue of JAMA and detail an effective educational project known as the ATLAS program. (1996-11-19)

Researcher Uses Computer Model Of Soccer Fan Crowd Behaviour To Model Trading Patterns Of Stockbrokers
The trading patterns of stockbrokers have a lot in common with the behaviour of crowds of soccer fans according to University of Warwick researcher Keith Still. Keith has developed mathematical tools using a part of ãChaos Theoryä that provides extremely accurate models of how crowds behave.He is now using it to predict stockbroker behaviour (1996-07-10)

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