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Current Fossil Record News and Events, Fossil Record News Articles.
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Table scraps can be used to reduce reliance on fossil fuels
Wasted food can be affordably turned into a clean substitute for fossil fuels. (2019-05-23)
New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature
A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures. (2019-05-23)
Hot new approach to 'green' hydrogen production is 'next logical step'
Electrifying the conventional fossil-fueled approaches to steam-methane reforming (SMR) enables a 'greener' approach to industrial hydrogen production, one that maximizes methane conversion while limiting the formation of unwanted carbon byproducts, researchers report. (2019-05-23)
Need for rigorous procedures within electrochemical production of ammonia
Many experimental studies of electrochemical synthesis of ammonia are flawed. (2019-05-22)
Researchers gain key insight into solar material's soaring efficiency
In collaboration with partners at Loughborough University in the United Kingdom, researchers at CSU's National Science Foundation-supported Next Generation Photovoltaics Center have reported a key breakthrough in how the performance of cadmium telluride thin-film solar cells is improved even further by the addition of another material, selenium. (2019-05-22)
In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (2019-05-21)
3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved. (2019-05-21)
Testifying while black: A linguistic analysis of disparities in court transcription
A new study has found that court reporters transcribe speakers of African American English significantly below their required level of accuracy. (2019-05-21)
Sedimentary, dear Johnson: Is NASA looking at the wrong rocks for clues to Martian life?
In 2020, NASA and European-Russian missions will look for evidence of past life on Mars. (2019-05-17)
Electric car switch on for health benefits
Could the health benefits and reduced costs to healthcare systems be enough to justify subsidizing charging infrastructure to allow society to switch from the internal combustion engine to electric vehicles faster than current trends predict? (2019-05-16)
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but by two Florida Museum of Natural History volunteers. (2019-05-16)
Concerns as MPs' links to organization backed by tobacco industry revealed
No fewer than 25 serving Conservative MPs, including several leadership candidates, are connected to an organization part-funded by the tobacco industry and responsible for a series of attacks on public health initiatives, reveals an investigation by The BMJ. (2019-05-15)
First birds: Archaeopteryx gets company
Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich describe a hitherto unknown bird from the late Jurassic period. (2019-05-14)
Tooth fossils fill 6-million-year-old gap in primate evolution
UNLV geoscientist, student among international research team behind discovery of ancient monkey species that lived in Africa 22 million years ago. (2019-05-14)
Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc
The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era. (2019-05-09)
The bird that came back from the dead
New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'. (2019-05-09)
Research reveals surprisingly powerful bite of tiny early tetrapod
Micro-CT scanning of a tiny snake-like fossil discovered in Scotland has shed new light on the elusive creature, thought to be one of the earliest known tetrapods to develop teeth that allowed it to crush its prey. (2019-05-09)
Solar-powered hydrogen fuels a step closer
A cheaper, cleaner and more sustainable way of making hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight is step closer thanks to new research from the University of Bath's Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies. (2019-05-08)
Statistical study finds it unlikely South African fossil species is ancestral to humans
Research by UChicago paleontologists finds that it is unlikely that a two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa is a direct ancestor of Homo, the genus to which modern-day humans belong. (2019-05-08)
Tibetan plateau first occupied by middle Pleistocene Denisovans
A joint research team led by CHEN Fahu from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and ZHANG Dongju from the Lanzhou University reported their studies on a human mandible found in Xiahe, on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. (2019-05-07)
New 3-foot-tall relative of Tyrannosaurus rex
'Suskityrannus gives us a glimpse into the evolution of tyrannosaurs just before they take over the planet,' said Sterling Nesbit. (2019-05-06)
Impossible research produces 400-year El Niño record, revealing startling changes
Coral experts around the world said it was impossible to extract a multi-century record of El Niño events. (2019-05-06)
Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms
Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago -- a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids. (2019-05-02)
Harnessing sunlight to pull hydrogen from wastewater
Hydrogen is a critical component in the manufacture of thousands of common products from plastic to fertilizers, but producing pure hydrogen is expensive and energy intensive. (2019-05-01)
First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans
So far Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. (2019-05-01)
Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. (2019-04-30)
Australian blue tongue lizard ancestor was round-in-the-tooth
Reconstruction of the most complete fossil lizard found in Australia, a 15 million year old relative of our modern blue tongues and social skinks named Egernia gillespieae, reveals the creature was equipped with a robust crushing jaw and was remarkably similar to modern lizards. (2019-04-30)
Holy Pleistocene Batman, the answer's in the cave
Examining a 3-meter stack of bat feces has shed light on the landscape of the ancient continent of Sundaland. (2019-04-25)
How to take the 'petro' out of the petrochemicals industry
University of Toronto Engineering researchers chart a course for how an alternative technology -- renewable electrosynthesis -- could usher in a more sustainable chemical industry, and ultimately enable us to leave much more oil and gas in the ground. (2019-04-25)
Fossil crab reveals a new branch in the tree of life
Taking on characteristics from another, younger stage in its life-cycle, a newly named fossil crab species was able to adapt to new conditions. (2019-04-24)
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. (2019-04-18)
Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the evolution of lobe-finned fishes and land animals, as published in Nature. (2019-04-17)
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years
An ancient and rare beetle fossil is the oldest example of a social relationship between two animal species. (2019-04-17)
Meet Gobihadros, a new species of Mongolian hadrosaur
The complete skeletal remains of a new species of Mongolian dinosaur fill in a gap in the evolution of hadrosaurs, according to a study released April 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Khishigjav Tsogtbataaar of the Mongolian Academy of Science, David Evans of the Royal Ontario Museum, and colleagues. (2019-04-17)
Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more
During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. (2019-04-11)
'Cthulhu' fossil reconstruction reveals monstrous relative of modern sea cucumbers
An exceptionally preserved fossil from Herefordshire in the UK has given new insights into the early evolution of sea cucumbers, according to an article published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. (2019-04-09)
The return of Cthulhu -- the small sea critter
Researchers at Yale, Oxford, the University of Leicester, Imperial College London, and University College London have identified a 430-million-year-old fossil as a new species related to living sea cucumbers. (2019-04-09)
New computer-aided model may help predict sepsis
Can a computer-aided model predict life-threatening sepsis? A model developed in the UK that uses routinely collected data to identify early symptoms of sepsis, published in CMAJ, shows promise. (2019-04-08)
Earth's recovery from mass extinction could take millions of years
Recovering from mass extinction has a 'speed limit,' say researchers, with gradual patterns of ecosystem redevelopment and speciation. (2019-04-08)
Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions
It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. (2019-04-08)
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