Current Foster Care News and Events

Current Foster Care News and Events, Foster Care News Articles.
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New research about emerging 'COVID-19 personality types'
New research just published identifies and explores the impacts of salient viral or COVID-19 behavioural identities that are emerging. (2021-01-29)

At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms
For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports. They show that mouse pups prefer their mothers to unfamiliar mouse mothers as newborns and remember them after up to 100 days apart--although they prefer unfamiliar mouse mothers as adults. (2021-01-26)

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low. (2021-01-12)

Examining association of age, household dysfunction, outcomes in early adulthood
Population data from Denmark were used to examine whether age at exposure to negative experiences in childhood and adolescence (parents' unemployment, incarceration, mental disorders, death and divorce, and the child's foster care experiences) was associated with outcomes in early adulthood. (2021-01-07)

How to motivate people to follow restrictions: 13 principles for COVID-19 communication
Based on a large body of existing research, four leading researchers of self-determination theory, Frank Martela (Aalto University), Nelli Hankonen (University of Helsinki), Richard M. Ryan (Australian Catholic University) and Maarten Vansteenkiste (Universiteit Gent) have crystallised 13 communication principles to foster voluntary compliance in a crisis such as COVID-19. The paper been approved for publication in the prestigious European Review of Social Psychology. (2021-01-04)

How the American child welfare system lost its way
Black children are removed from their families at much greater rates than any other race or ethnicity in this country. At the same time the sheer number of all child abuse investigations in the US is staggering: experts estimate that by age 18 one out of three children has been the subject of a child protective services investigation. Yet, many of these investigations and removals are unjustified, says University of Rochester health policy historian and physician Mical Raz. (2020-12-22)

Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research, published in Nature, has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states (2020-12-17)

Study evaluates new World Health Organization Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers
The World Health Organization developed the new Labor Care Guide to support clinicians in providing good quality, women-centered care during labor and childbirth. In a study published in Birth, researchers evaluated the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of the new Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers in six countries. (2020-11-20)

Efforts needed to better integrate family caregivers into health care teams
An estimated 53 million family members and friends provide care assistance to loved ones in the United States, yet family caregivers face significant barriers coordinating their efforts with the formal health care team. A new study suggests changes the health care system can make to better integrate family members into the health care team. (2020-11-10)

Researchers examine if online physician reviews indicate clinical outcomes
Dr. Atanu Lahiri and Dr. Zhiqiang Zheng studied the relationship between online reviews of physicians and their patients' actual clinical outcomes. They wanted to know how much consumers can rely on the reviews, specifically in regard to chronic-disease care. (2020-11-09)

Standardized measures needed to screen kinship foster placements
New research is proposing a novel screening tool to assess the quality of care in kinship foster care placement settings. Kinship caregiving--placing a child in a relative's home if the child cannot safely stay in the family home--is becoming more common and is a preferred option for children, says UBC Okanagan Assistant Professor Sarah Dow-Fleisner. (2020-10-29)

COVID-19 pandemic drives innovation in diabetes care
The COVID-19 pandemic has jumpstarted innovation in health care delivery and allowed for real-world testing of diabetes care models in unprecedented ways, according to a manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-10-20)

Labor epidurals do not cause autism; Safe for mothers and infants, say anesthesiology, obstetrics
Five medical societies aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article ''Association Between Epidural Analgesia During Labor and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring,'' a new retrospective database study published in JAMA Pediatrics on October 12th, 2020 does not provide credible scientific evidence that labor epidurals for pain relief cause autism. (2020-10-12)

Researchers use precision medicine to reverse severe lymphatic disorder
Through genetic sequencing and targeted treatment, researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have resolved a severe lymphatic disorder in a young woman with kaposiform lymphangiomatosis (KLA), a complex and rare disorder that causes lymphatic vessels around the heart and lung to leak fluid, causing breathing difficulties, infections, and often death. The treatment led to a complete resolution of the patient's symptoms and fully remodeled her lymphatic system within a matter of months. (2020-10-05)

Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model. However, rural clinics often lack the workforce capacity to provide collaborative behavioral health services. In a new qualitative study, rural Washington primary care clinics adopted telehealth methods to connect remotely with specialists. The study found that telepsychiatric collaboration prepared primary care physicians and rural clinic staff to deliver high quality mental health care in underserved areas. (2020-09-15)

Medical errors increase following the spring change to daylight saving time
Seeking medical care after springing forward to daylight saving time could be a risky proposition. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found a statistically significant increase in adverse medical events that might be related to human error in the week after the annual time change in the spring. (2020-08-27)

Study examines link between sperm quality and light from devices at night
Men might want to think twice before reaching for their smartphone at night. A new study found correlations between electronic media use at night and poor sperm quality. (2020-08-26)

Effect of remdesivir vs standard care on clinical status of patients with moderate COVID-19
This open-label randomized trial compares the effect of remdesivir (5 or 10 days) compared with standard care on clinical status 11 days after treatment initiation among patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection hospitalized with moderate pneumonia. (2020-08-21)

Peer mentorship can be more effective, accessible than traditional mentorship in academic medicine
Peer mentorship is a critical and more accessible option for professional and personal growth than traditional mentor-mentee relationships, according to a new paper from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-07-23)

The five phases of pandemic care for primary care
The authors present a roadmap for necessary primary care practice transformations to care for patients and communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-14)

Nearly half of Americans lack knowledge of burn injuries and treatment
Summertime means Americans spend more time around grills, firepits, and fireworks, increasing their risk for fire-related burn injuries. While 53% of Americans say they know some or a lot about burn injuries and treatment, many mistakenly underestimate their risks with these activities, according to a new Arizona Burn Center at Valleywise Health/Ipsos survey. Only 11% know that fire-flame injuries such as those from a firepit or grill are the most common types of burn injuries. (2020-06-30)

Indirect adverse effects of COVID-19 on children and youth's mental, physical health
Despite reports that children and young people may be less likely to get coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) than older adults, there may be substantial indirect adverse effects of the disease on their physical and mental health, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201008 (2020-06-25)

School may be the key to improvement for children in social care
Children in social care have poorer mental health and perform worse in school than other children. But they have trust in the school staff and perform better after individual assessment at school. These are findings in a doctoral thesis from Linköping University. (2020-06-12)

COVID-19 spurs increase in self-care, new survey shows
The vast majority of U.S. adults (80%) say they will be more mindful about practicing self-care regularly once the pandemic is over, according to a new survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Nearly half of Americans (46%) also report that they are struggling to find ways to maintain their whole health (i.e., physical, mental, and spiritual health) during the pandemic. (2020-06-03)

Report looks to improve quality measures for medical care of homebound older adults
There are an estimated 2 million older adults who are homebound or unable to leave their homes due to multiple chronic conditions and functional impairment. Home-based primary care provides access to care for these patients and has been shown to save costs for the Medicare program. (2020-05-22)

Quantum Hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3D topological materials
US and German physicists have found surprising evidence of a link between the 2D quantum Hall effect and 3D topological materials that could be used in quantum computing. (2020-05-18)

Genome-wide pattern found in tumors from brain cancer patients predicts life expectancy
For the past 70 years, the best indicator of life expectancy for a patient with glioblastoma -- the most common and the most aggressive brain cancer -- has been age at diagnosis. Now, an international team of scientists has experimentally validated a predictor that is not only more accurate but also more clinically relevant: a pattern of co-occurring changes in DNA abundance levels, or copy numbers, at hundreds of thousands of sites across the whole tumor genome. (2020-05-15)

What we can learn from Singapore's COVID-19 containment response in primary care
Singapore, a global hub for international travel and business, was among the first countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. With its first confirmed COVID-19 case on Jan. 23, 2020, the country mounted aggressive public health and containment measures. The country's network of primary care clinics were at the front lines of these measures. In this new report, those physicians share their triage, containment and infection control measures -- including protocols they put in place to ensure the safety of health care workers. (2020-05-12)

Primary care practice transformation introduces different staff types
The Comprehensive Primary Care initiative was launched in 2012 by the CMS Innovation Center as a four-year multi-payer initiative designed to strengthen primary care. This study examines shifts in staffing patterns, from 2012 to 2016, at 461 primary care practices participating in the CPC transformation initiative with those at 358 non-CPC practices. (2020-05-12)

Primary care case management among frequent users with chronic conditions
Case management is an effective, collaborative, and cost-effective way to help frequent users of health care services integrate all aspects of their care. The research team behind this study developed a program theory to investigate how, and in what circumstances, case management in primary care works to improve outcomes among frequent users who have chronic conditions. (2020-05-12)

After cancer: The role of primary care in cancer survivorship care
Primary care physicians are treating an increasing number of cancer survivors, yet they have no clear guidance on how best to care for such patients. This study considers how primary care physicians perceive their role in delivering care to cancer survivors. (2020-05-12)

The unexpected benefits of tailored exercise for aged care residents
Tailored exercise programs led by accredited exercise physiologists don't just provide physical benefits for residents living in aged care -- they improve mental wellbeing and social engagement, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research. (2020-05-06)

Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine. (2020-05-05)

Mental health preparedness among older youth in foster care
Researchers interviewed 17-year-olds in California foster care. The adolescents' use of mental health services is elevated, but not necessarily their confidence level. (2020-04-20)

Novel treatment, social services program improves outcomes for opioid-dependent mothers
A new study published in the April issue of the journal Health Affairs says that, since its inception, Project Nurture has helped to reduce the necessary placement of children in foster care by more than 8 percentage points. The rate of reported maltreatment within the child's first year of life also declined by approximately 7 percentage points. (2020-04-08)

Curbing the rising toll of adults with complex care needs
In an article just published in JAMA Health Forum, nurse researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) underscore that while responses to the problem have resulted in well-motivated innovations, an effective and actionable path for immediate and long-term remediation should encompass micro- and macro-level solutions. (2020-04-06)

Journal of the American Geriatrics society highlights 'ABCDs' of COVID-19 for older adults
The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) this week rushed to publication a special article describing critical points for combatting the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic for older adults and those in long-term care. (2020-03-27)

Leaving care of the children's home -- for prison?
When 18-year-old youths transition out of children's homes, what crimes do they commit? How often? Does it get worse over time? These juveniles move into an uncertain world, highly vulnerable, and with little social capital. They are generally viewed as at risk for criminal activities, supported by limited research globally. An unusual, small 6-year longitudinal study in South Africa sheds light on the under-researched lives of juvenile care leavers. (2020-03-22)

SFU research uses simulation game to alter beliefs about poverty
In advancing research to tackle the problem of burgeoning global economic inequality, researchers at Simon Fraser University used a poverty simulation game called SPENT to foster greater understanding of what causes poverty and economic inequality. (2020-03-16)

Unexpected ways animals influence fires
Animals eating plants might seem like an obvious way to suppress fire, and humans are already using the enormous appetites of goats, deer, and cows to reduce the fuel available for potential wildfires. But other animals such as birds, termites, and elephants can also double as ecosystem engineers as they go about their day-to-day grass-chewing, track-making, or nest-building. Researchers describe these activities March 5 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. (2020-03-05)

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