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Current Foster Care News and Events, Foster Care News Articles.
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Gulf coast mollusks rode out past periods of climate change
About 55 million years ago, a rapidly warming climate decimated marine communities around the world. But according to new research, it was a different story for snails, clams and other mollusks living in the shallow waters along what is now the Gulf Coast of the United States. They were able to survive. (2020-02-10)

Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math
Mathematicians, physicists and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right. But a team of such researchers including Dr. Jamie Foster, a mathematician at the University of Portsmouth, are challenging common espresso wisdom. (2020-01-22)

New policy reduces anti-psychotic medications in foster children
Rutgers researchers have found that a Texas strategy to reduce anti-psychotic medication for children can serve as a model for other state Medicaid programs. (2020-01-21)

Climate (not humans) shaped early forests of New England
A new, multidisciplinary study by archaeologists, ecologists, and paleoclimatologists overturns long-held interpretations of the role humans played in shaping the American landscape before European colonization. The findings give new insight into the rationale and approaches for managing biodiverse landscapes in the eastern US. (2020-01-20)

Innovation is widespread in rural areas, not just cities
Conventional measures of innovation suggest that only big cities foster new ideas, but a more comprehensive measure developed at Penn State shows that innovation is widespread even in rural places not typically thought of as innovative. (2020-01-02)

Biomarker may aid in determining treatment for cancer patients
A blood test revealed the presence of a biomarker that may offer insights into the survival rates of glioblastoma patients. (2019-12-09)

New ultra-miniaturized scope less invasive, produces higher quality images
Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images. (2019-12-06)

Air pollution linked to higher glaucoma risk
Living in a more polluted area is associated with a greater likelihood of having glaucoma, a debilitating eye condition that can cause blindness, finds a new UCL-led study in the UK. People in neighbourhoods with higher amounts of fine particulate matter pollution were at least 6% more likely to report having glaucoma than those in the least-polluted areas, according to the findings published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. (2019-11-25)

Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)

A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)

LSU Health research discovers potential new Rx target for AMD and Alzheimer's
Research led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found a new mechanism by which a class of molecules his lab discovered may protect brain and retinal cells against neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration and Alzheimer's. (2019-11-11)

Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community
Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of US nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report released today. (2019-10-23)

Subunit contribution to NMDA receptor hypofunction and redox sensitivity of hippocampal synaptic transmission during aging
The researchers examined the contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits in the redox-mediated decline in NMDAR function during aging. Glu N2A and Glu N2B selective antagonists decreased peak NMDAR currents to a similar extent in young and aged animals, indicating that a shift in diheteromeric Glu N2 subunits does not underlie the age-related decrease in the NMDAR synaptic function. The results indicate that activity-dependent NMDAR synaptic plasticity is suppressed by redox-mediated inhibition of Ca MKII activation during aging. (2019-10-14)

Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)

Study: Spend more on housing, teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed
New research: Spend more on transitional housing and teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed. (2019-09-18)

Kaiser Permanente reduces secondary cardiac events through virtual cardiac rehabilitation program
Kaiser Permanente has demonstrated promising results in reducing secondary cardiac events and rehospitalizations by creating a virtual cardiac rehabilitation program that fits seamlessly into patients' lives. Increasing rates of program enrollment and completion have been key factors in the improved outcomes. Results and details about the program were published today in NEJM Catalyst. (2019-08-28)

Support needed for foster carers of LGBTQ young people
Research shows that more support is needed for foster carers looking after LGBTQ young people. Findings from the first ever study of LGBTQ young people in care in England found good examples of foster carers being available and sensitive, and offering acceptance and membership of their family. But there was also evidence of foster carers struggling to meeting the needs of LGBTQ young people due to a lack of knowledge, skills and support, ambivalence, discomfort, homophobia or transphobia. (2019-07-29)

Burnout symptoms associated with racial bias in medical residents
Mayo Clinic researchers have found an association between increased symptoms of burnout and heightened racial bias in medical residents. The study appears in JAMA Network Open. 'When physicians aren't operating in an optimal mental and emotional state, they may find it harder to push back against their own biases,' says Liselotte Dyrbye, M.D., who led the study. 'If burnout contributes to disparities in care, perhaps fighting burnout can help narrow that gap.' (2019-07-26)

Children in foster care removed from homes for parental drug use
A research letter analyzed federally mandated data on children in foster care in the United States to examine how many children entered foster care because of parental drug use during the 2000 to 2017 fiscal years. There were nearly 5 million foster care entries during this period, of which nearly 1.2 million (about 23%) were home removals because of parental drug use. (2019-07-15)

Unprecedented display of concern towards unknown monkey offers hope for endangered species
A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, 'consoling' and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighboring group. The observations by a scientist from Oxford University and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (ifaw) are published today in the journal Primates. (2019-07-10)

A structured approach to detecting and treating depression in primary care
A questionnaire-based management algorithm for major depressive disorder in primary care is feasible to implement, though attrition from treatment is high. (2019-07-10)

Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act
The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. Because the number of primary care physicians has remained stable, access to care has been a concern. (2019-07-10)

How primary care physicians can make Astana work
The Astana Declaration, adopted by the World Health Organization in October 2018, acknowledges the importance of primary health care to achieve better health outcomes globally. But how, the authors ask, can physicians make this declaration work? (2019-07-10)

More money, skills and knowledge needed for social prescribing to serve as route into work
A new report from The Work Foundation, Embedding Work and Related Outcomes into Social Prescribing: Overcoming Challenges and Maximising Opportunities, says social prescribing can be an effective means of integrating people into work. However, government and wider stakeholders must address a range of cultural and practical barriers to realise this potential. (2019-07-04)

What do sick kids really want in hospital?
Researchers at ECU's School of Nursing developed the 'Needs of Children Questionnaire' (NCQ), the first of its kind to measure children's self-reported psychosocial, physical and emotional needs in paediatric wards. (2019-07-02)

Butting out: Researchers gauge public opinion on tobacco product waste
Requiring cigarettes to contain biodegradable filters, fining smokers who litter cigarette butts and expanding smoke free outdoor areas are measures the public considers are most likely to reduce tobacco product waste, new University of Otago research reveals. (2019-06-13)

Male victims of domestic abuse face significant barriers to getting help
Men who experience domestic violence and abuse face significant barriers to getting help and access to specialist support services, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care and Centre for Gender and Violence Research published in BMJ Open today. (2019-06-11)

New tool measures primary care as a whole
There are a number of measures to assess aspects of primary care, but a new measure breaks new ground by combining experiences of patients, clinicians, and payers and allowing the most informed reporter -- the patient -- to assess vital primary care functions that are often missed. (2019-05-14)

Can adverse childhood experiences worsen lupus symptoms?
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) encompass traumas such as abuse, neglect, and household challenges. In an Arthritis Care & Research study of adults with lupus, higher ACE levels, as well as the presence of ACEs from each of these three domains, were associated with worse patient-reported accounts of disease activity, organ damage, depression, physical function, and overall health status. (2019-05-09)

New model improves staging and risk predictions for esophageal cancer patients
A new nomogram for assessing metastatic risk in esophageal cancer patients shows promise for more accurate risk-stratification, which is particularly relevant for stage T2 patients. (2019-05-06)

Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement can improve outcomes in low-risk surgical patients
A new study examines the effects of TAVR with a balloon-expandable valve for low-risk patients. (2019-05-06)

Massachusetts General study finds women pay more for over-the-counter moisturizers
A study from dermatologists at Massachusetts General Hospital finds significant, gender-based price discrepancies in facial moisturizing products at three top online retailers - Amazon, Target, and Walmart. (2019-04-29)

IMF's structural adjustment programs slash bureaucratic quality in developing countries
Bureaucratic quality in developing countries is endangered by the structural adjustment programs imposed by the international financial institutions, a paper by Bocconi's Alexander Kentikelenis and colleagues, in the American Journal of Sociology, states. In particular, the IMF's structural reforms mandating privatization, price deregulation, and reductions in public sector employment jeopardize state capacity by compromising the healthy relationship between state and business, as in uncertain times bureaucrats are more likely to fall prey to private interests. (2019-04-19)

Uninformed, overwhelmed clients; unrealistic agency expectations
Contracted private agencies provide approximately 33 percent of foster care placement services and 59 percent of family preservation services. State child welfare agencies are increasingly turning to them for a range of services. While turnover and burnout among child welfare case managers is well-understood, little is known about the challenges private agency therapists experience working in child welfare systems. (2019-04-16)

Animal-assisted therapy improves social behavior in patients with brain injuries
Animal-assisted therapy can foster social competence in patients with brain injuries and increase their emotional involvement during therapy. These were the findings of a clinical trial conducted by psychologists from the University of Basel and published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-04-09)

Mass. General study provides insight into use of critical care resources
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found wide variation in the use of different hospital units -- intensive care or general medical units -- to deliver a type of advanced respiratory support called noninvasive ventilation. (2019-04-08)

Autism brings qualities which help at home and at work, study shows
Autism enhances characteristics such as loyalty and focus which help those with the condition at work and in their relationships with others, experts have found. (2019-04-05)

Government and NHS leaders could do more to encourage collaborative relationships between healthcare
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published a briefing note outlining the factors that can contribute to disagreements between parents and healthcare staff about the care and treatment of critically ill babies and young children. It concludes that the Government and NHS leaders could do more to foster good, collaborative relationships between parents and healthcare staff across the UK. (2019-04-03)

Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Colorado, Boulder have moved a step closer to developing the next generation of data storage and processing devices, using an emerging science called skyrmionics. (2019-04-01)

Sleepovers reduce stress in shelter dogs
Foster care provides valuable information about dog behavior that can help homeless dogs living in shelters find forever homes. The Arizona State University Canine Science Collaboratory found short-term fostering benefited shelter dogs in Arizona, Utah, Texas, Montana and Georgia. Stress hormone levels were reduced during one- and two-night sleepovers, and dogs also rested more during and immediately following a sleepover. (2019-04-01)

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