Current Fraud News and Events

Current Fraud News and Events, Fraud News Articles.
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City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplaces
New research carried out by Dr Andrea Baronchelli and his colleagues into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19, has revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs), especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines. (2021-02-04)

City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplace before vaccine
Dr Andrea Baronchelli, and colleagues have carried out insightful research into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19; they have revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs) especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines. (2021-02-04)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

Sub-surface imaging technology can expose counterfeit travel documents
New research by the University of Kent has found that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technology can be utilised to distinguish between legitimate and counterfeit travel documents. (2021-02-02)

Scientists develop method to detect fake news
Social media is increasingly used to spread fake news. The same problem can be found on the capital market - criminals spread fake news about companies in order to manipulate share prices. Researchers at the Universities of Göttingen and Frankfurt and the Jožef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana have developed an approach that can recognise such fake news, even when the news contents are repeatedly adapted. The results of the study were published in the Journal of the Association for Information Systems. (2021-02-01)

New technology to detect bitter almonds in real time
Incorporating NIRS technology to almond analysis allows for quantifying amygdalin levels, the compound that causes the nut's bitter taste, on an industrial scale. (2021-01-29)

Academic dishonesty: Fear and justifications
Why do some students cheat by looking over someone's shoulder, furtively searching for test answers on the internet, using cheat sheets during exams or paying others to complete their coursework? How do they rationalise their behaviour to continue to think of themselves as decent people? A study conducted by the HSE Centre for Sociology of Higher Education offers some answers. (2020-12-02)

Why does it matter if most Republican voters still think Biden lost?
As President-elect Joe Biden and his administrative team officially begin the transition process, only about 20 percent of Republican voters consider him the true winner of the election. Nearly half of all respondents--48 percent--still expect President Donald Trump to be inaugurated for a second term on January 20, despite plenty of indicators to the contrary. Those are among the findings of the latest Bright Line Watch (November) survey--conducted by political science faculty at the University of Rochester, Chicago, and Dartmouth. (2020-12-02)

Barriers to police investigations into widespread financial crime unveiled
A majority of police detectives in England and Wales investigating financial crime do not have sufficient knowledge to build a successful case. That's the finding of new research from the University of Portsmouth, looking into why results of such investigations vary so widely, especially when the crimes account for half of all criminal activity in the UK. (2020-11-24)

New studies find financially exploited seniors show brain differences and are more frail
Two recent studies led by USC provide new insight into factors that put older adults at risk for financial exploitation. One study found that those who report being financially exploited show differences in the activity of brain regions tied to decision-making and social judgments compared to those without a history of financial exploitation. The other showed that financially exploited seniors are frailer physically -- with particular deficits in vision and hearing -- compared to their peers. (2020-11-18)

Corporate fraud may lead to neighborhood financial crimes
After a major corporate fraud case hits a city, financially motivated neighborhood crimes like robbery and theft increase in the area, a new study suggests. Researchers from The Ohio State University and Indiana University found that the revelation of corporate accounting misconduct is linked to about a 2.3 percent increase in local financially motivated crimes in the following year. (2020-11-16)

Seafood mislabeling is having negative impacts on the marine environment
As the most globally traded food commodity, seafood production and its supply chains are often complex and opaque. Contemporaneous with the increase in seafood consumption, evidence of mislabeling has become ubiquitous. Yet, little is known about the consequences of seafood mislabeling. New research by Advanced Conservation Strategies and colleagues show that conditions exist for mislabeling to generate negative impacts on marine populations and to support consumption of products from poorly managed fisheries. (2020-11-16)

Lack of positivity bias can predict relapse in bipolar disorder
Relapse in people with bipolar disorder can be predicted accurately by their tendency towards having pessimistic beliefs, according to a study published today in eLife. (2020-11-10)

Shining a light on the issue of wine fraud
University of Adelaide wine researchers are developing a fast and simple method of authenticating wine - a potential solution against the estimated billions of dollars' worth of wine fraud globally, but also offering a possible means of building regional branding. (2020-11-05)

Fighting food fraud from farm to fork with a mobile ingredient tracing system
Savvy shoppers increasingly expect to know the origin of the food they eat, whether they shop at farmers' markets or big-box major retailers. A prototype app proposed by researchers at the University of Tokyo aims to provide full transparency from farm to table along food supply chains and meet the needs of smallholder farmers, boutique producers, and industrial growers. (2020-11-02)

Experts see substantial danger to democratic stability around 2020 election
The latest Bright Line Watch survey finds substantial risks to the legitimacy of the election, including potential problems in the casting and counting of votes, the Electoral College, and in the resolution of electoral disputes. (2020-10-30)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Countering anti-vaccination influences from social media - with conversation
What effect, if any, do anti-vaccination social media messages have on actual vaccination behavior? A new study using big data and survey results from the 2018-19 flu season finds strong associations between regional social media messages and vaccination attitudes and behavior. But when there are negative associations between social media content and vaccination, real-life discussions with family and friends appear to eliminate them. (2020-08-10)

Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm developed in the lab of Jr-Shin Li at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis provides a framework for solving complex linear inverse problems that doesn't require a supercomputer and also enhances security and privacy. (2020-08-04)

No honor among cyber thieves
A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online 'carding forums,' illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information. (2020-07-22)

Could your computer please be more polite? Thank you
In a tense time when a pandemic rages, politicians wrangle for votes and protesters demand racial justice, a little politeness and courtesy go a long way. Now researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated method for making communications more polite. Specifically, the method takes nonpolite directives or requests -- those that use either impolite or neutral language -- and restructures them or adds words to make them more well-mannered. (2020-06-30)

New research says displaying fake reviews increases consumer trust in platforms by 80%
Many people are using COVID-19 quarantine to get projects done at home, meaning plenty of online shopping for tools and supplies. But do you buy blind? Research shows 97% of consumers consult product reviews before making a purchase. Fake reviews are a significant threat for online review portals and product search engines given the potential for damage to consumer trust. Little is known about what review portals should do with fraudulent reviews after detecting them. (2020-06-18)

How to handle fraudulent reviews on online portals? Study gives tips to managers
A new study sought to determine how consumers respond to potentially fraudulent reviews and how review portals (e.g., Amazon, Expedia, TripAdvisor, Yelp) can leverage this information to design better fraud-management policies and increase consumers' trust. It found that portals that include fraudulent reviews are more likely to boost buyers' trust. (2020-06-11)

Lightning fast algorithms can lighten the load of 3D hologram generation
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a new way of calculating simple holograms for heads-up displays (HUDs) and near-eye displays (NEDs). The method is up to 56 times faster than conventional algorithms and does not require power-hungry graphics processing units (GPUs), running on normal computing cores like those found in PCs. This opens the way to developing compact, power-efficient, next-gen augmented reality devices, including 3D navigation on car windshields and eyewear. (2020-06-06)

COVID-19, fake science, and conspiracy theories
What past scientific fraud is at the heart of some current anti-vaccine and anti-COVID-19 conspiracy theories? (2020-06-02)

High-security identification that cannot be counterfeited
Researchers from University of Tsukuba have used the principles that underpin the whispering-gallery effect to create an unbeatable anti-counterfeiting system. The researchers' system is a microchip consisting of two-step authentication. Step 1 is the visible pattern on the chip. Step 2 is the non-forgeable color fingerprint of the chip. These microchips will be useful for high-security authentication. (2020-05-26)

The wildlife trade encompasses all major branches of the biological tree of life
The wildlife trade is a multibillion-dollar industry that threatens biodiversity. Exploiting wildlife by selling it, their parts or their products is one of the most profitable activities in the world. A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki spotlights the significance of all major taxonomic groups in the global wildlife trade and calls for action to fill in our gaps in knowledge. The group also lists nine actions anyone can take to fight the illegal wildlife trade. (2020-05-26)

Online romance scams: A modern form of fraud
This paper presents a scoping review of the quantitative and qualitative evidence on this issue, focusing on epidemiological aspects, relational dynamics, and the psychological characteristics of victims and scammers. (2020-05-15)

Blockchain: forget the criminal record, it might just save your life -- new study
Blockchain is set to become a friend to consumers, protecting them from tainted food, fake medicine, fraud and products with illegal or unethical origins (2020-05-13)

Randomly selecting leaders could prove to be a remedy for hubris
History shows us that power tends to corrupt; a team of Swiss and German researchers have recently examined historical examples of large-scale business fraud and misconduct at the highest-levels of government in order to highlight how leaders sometimes lose all sense of morality. Inflicting serious harm on their company or society in this new study in The Leadership Quarterly, published by Elsevier. (2020-05-13)

'McDonaldization' based analysis of Russian social networks
The author describes his concept this way: 'the principles of the fast-food restaurant are coming to dominate more and more sectors of recent'. McDonaldization as a form of rationality has a specter of advantages. By using it a person may become more disciplined and learn how to set goals and achieve them (2020-03-27)

In an Internet vacuum, private securities companies prosper in the 'new wild west'
A 'quiet' revolution in unregulated areas of the internet has led to the emergence of a new private security industry, according to latest research from the University of Portsmouth. Often described as the ''new wild west'', criminals see new opportunities online, with this latest study showing how individuals and organisations are now taking the law into their own hands in order to protect themselves. (2020-02-20)

Financial pressure makes CFOs less likely to blow the whistle
A recent study finds that corporate financial managers do a great job of detecting signs of potential fraud, but are less likely to voice these concerns externally when their company is under pressure to meet a financial target. (2020-02-10)

Inequitable medicare reimbursements threaten care of most vulnerable
Hospitals, doctors and Medicare Advantage insurance plans that care for some of the most vulnerable patients are not reimbursed fairly by Medicare, according to recent findings in JAMA. (2020-02-07)

A photo taken with a mobile phone to detect frauds in rice labelling
Including plastic that is undetectable by the consumer or distorting the quality of the product are some of the frauds facing the third most consumed cereal in the world: rice. An international research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has developed a way to deal with deception using artificial intelligence: photograph rice grains to verify labelling. (2019-12-20)

'Inconsistent and misleading' password meters could increase risk of cyber attacks
With the worst passwords of 2019 now revealed, and technology topping many festive wish lists, a new study by the University of Plymouth assessed the effectiveness of password meters that people are likely to use or encounter on a regular basis. (2019-12-19)

You did what with my donation? When donors feel betrayed by charities
When people learn that a charitable contribution they earmarked for a specific project was used for another cause, they feel betrayed -- and often punish the charity, new research from Washington State University indicates. (2019-12-13)

Citizen scientists deserve more credit, researchers argue
In a paper published in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, a team led by biologist Dr Georgia Ward-Fear from Macquarie University in Australia and Dr Greg Pauly from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles argues that newfound respect for indigenous knowledge and changes in technology mean that non-professionals are taking greater roles in science work. (2019-12-02)

Study offers first large-sample evidence of the effect of ethics training on financial sector
New research from Notre Dame offers the first large-sample study on how rules and ethics training affects behavior and employment decisions in the financial sector. (2019-11-20)

CUHK Faculty of Engineering develops browser-based analysis framework observer
Malicious third-party advertisers or hackers expose web users to a security threat by injecting malicious JavaScript code to intercept user clicks and trick them into visiting untrusted web content. (2019-11-19)

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