Current Free Radicals News and Events

Current Free Radicals News and Events, Free Radicals News Articles.
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Samara Polytech scientists proved the anti-cancer properties of a number of plant extracts
The composition of some extracts obtained from plant raw materials was studied at Samara Polytech, and their anticarcinogenic and antioxidant properties were assessed. (2021-02-09)

New study finds cage-free egg-laying hen mortality declines over time
New research published today in the journal Scientific Reports based on the largest-to-date analysis of commercial data on egg-laying hen mortality finds that survival rates in higher-welfare cage-free housing systems increase over time as managers gain experience and knowledge accrues. These findings will reframe the debate on the welfare of laying hens and on the evolution of the egg industry. (2021-02-04)

Fossil pigments shed new light on vertebrate evolution
This new paper shows that melanin is more than just something that gives colour to the body. It played an important role in the evolution of warm-blooded animals and helped defined what birds and mammals look like today. By studying where melanin occurs in the body in fossils and modern animals researchers have produced the first model for how melanin has evolved over the last 500 million years. (2021-02-04)

Air-guiding in solid-core optical waveguides: A solution for on-chip trace gas spectroscopy
We demonstrate an air-suspended waveguide that exhibits exceptional field delocalization and an external field confinement of 107 %, providing a stronger interaction with the surrounding air than a free-space beam. Operating at mid-infrared wavelengths, the waveguide is an ideal building block of next-generation on-chip sensors for sensitive and specific trace gas detection by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). (2021-02-02)

A show of force: Novel polymer that toughens up and changes color upon mechanical stress
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a polymer whose properties change markedly after being exposed to mechanical stress. In bulk form, the mechano-responsive polymer shows color changing, fluorescence, and self-strengthening abilities even under simple compression or extension. These fundamental findings are unprecedented in the field of mechanochemistry and could pave the way for numerous applications in materials science. (2021-02-02)

Extreme UV laser shows generation of atmospheric pollutant
Hokkaido University scientists show that under laboratory conditions, ultraviolet light reacts with nitrophenol to produce smog-generating nitrous acid. (2021-02-02)

Aging-US: Anserine protected against cognitive decline
The Aging-US results suggest that anserine protects elderly persons with MCI from cognitive declines by suppressing MPO-mediated neuroinflammatory responses. (2021-02-02)

OSU smoke- and tobacco-free policies grew more popular over time, even among tobacco users
Support for policies prohibiting smoking and the use of tobacco products on Oregon State University's Corvallis campus grew substantially over a five-year span, especially among tobacco users, a recent OSU study found. (2021-01-28)

Eliminating microplastics in wastewater directly at the source
A research team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has developed a process for the electrolytic treatment of wastewater that degrades microplastics at the source. The results of this research have been published in the Environmental Pollution journal. (2021-01-18)

E-cigarettes stress lungs, impair protein function
E-cigarette exposure stresses and inflames the lungs of rats, compromising important quality control proteins, according to new research. (2021-01-18)

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers
Reactive molecules, such as free radicals, can be produced in the body after exposure to certain environments or substances and go on to cause cell damage. Antioxidants can minimize this damage by interacting with the radicals before they affect cells. (2021-01-08)

USTC develops ultrahigh-performance plasmonic metal-oxide materials
In a study published in Advanced Materials, the researchers from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, the University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, using an electron-proton co-doping strategy, invented a new metal-like semiconductor material with excellent plasmonic resonance performance. (2021-01-08)

Common drug may protect hearts from damage caused by breast cancer chemotherapy
New research from UHN's Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) shows statins, commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, may also protect the heart from damaging side-effects of early breast cancer treatment. (2021-01-06)

Dental experts discover biological imbalance is the link between gum and kidney disease
An imbalance of the body's oxygen producing free radicals and its antioxidant cells could be the reason why gum disease and chronic kidney disease affect each other, a new study led by the University of Birmingham has found. (2021-01-05)

Geology: Alpine summits may have been ice-free during life of Tyrolean Iceman
Alpine summits at 3,000 to 4,000 m may have been ice free until about 5,900 years ago, just before the lifetime of the Tyrolean Iceman (Oetzi), when new glaciers started to form, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-17)

A non-destructive method for analyzing Ancient Egyptian embalming materials
Ancient Egyptian mummies have many tales to tell, but unlocking their secrets without destroying delicate remains is challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have found a non-destructive way to analyze bitumen -- the compound that gives mummies their dark color -- in Ancient Egyptian embalming materials. The method provides clues to the bitumen's geographic origin and, in one experiment, revealed that a mummy in a French museum could have been partially restored, likely by collectors. (2020-12-16)

Radicals seem to be good for the brain
Scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) report in the journal Cell Stem Cell that reactive oxygen molecules, also known as 'free radicals.' are important for the brain's ability to adapt -- at least in mice. (2020-12-04)

Alcohol-free hand sanitizer just as effective against COVID as alcohol-based versions
A new study from researchers at Brigham Young University finds that alcohol-free hand sanitizer is just as effective at disinfecting surfaces from the COVID-19 virus as alcohol-based products. In most of the test cases, the compounds found in alcohol-free sanitizers wiped out at least 99.9% of the virus within 15 seconds. (2020-12-01)

N-heterocyclic phosphines: promising catalysts for transfer hydrogenation
N-heterocyclic phosphines (NHPs) have recently emerged as a new group of promising catalysts for metal-free reductions, owing to their unique hydridic reactivity. Compared with the conventional protic reactivity of phosphines, this umpolung P-H reactivity leads to inverse selectivity in NHP-mediated reductions, which has therefore found many applications in the catalytic reduction of polar unsaturated bonds. This review summarizes recent progress in studies of the reactivity and synthetic applications of these phosphorus-based hydrides. (2020-11-30)

Understanding the utility of plasmas for medical applications
Plasma medicine is an emerging field, as plasmas show promise for use in a wide range of therapies from wound healing to cancer treatment, and plasma jets are the main plasma sources typically used in plasma-surface applications. To better understand how plasma jets modify the surfaces of biological tissue, researchers conducted computer simulations of the interaction between an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with a surface that has properties similar to blood serum. (2020-11-24)

Taking a shine to polymers: Fluorescent molecule betrays the breakdown of polymer materials
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have come up with a simple method to evaluate the strength and performance of polymer materials. They present their innovation in the latest issue of Angewandte Chemie International Edition, and hope that their work will enable scientists and engineers to better evaluate the polymers they work with, and eventually synthesize better ones. (2020-11-24)

Environmental scientists' new ozonation method treats water from antibiotic residues
Clean drinking water is considered to be one of the earth's most precious and threatened resources. Recent studies show that increasing concentrations of pharmaceuticals can be found in surface waters, which can end up in drinking water. TalTech environmental scientists are looking for ways to treat drinking water from hazardous pharmaceutical residues. (2020-11-17)

Yin and Yang: Two signaling molecules control growth and behavior in bacteria
Bacteria are considered to be true experts in survival. Their rapid adaptive response to changing environmental conditions is based, among other things, on two competing signaling molecules. As the 'Yin and Yang' of metabolic control they decide on the lifestyle of bacteria, as reported by researchers from the University of Basel. The new findings also play a role in the context of bacterial infections. (2020-11-09)

Ultraheavy precision polymers
An environmentally friendly and sustainable synthesis of ''heavyweight'' polymers with very narrow molecular weight distributions is an important concept in modern polymer chemistry. Thanks to a new photoenzymatic process, Chinese researchers have been able to increase the range of possible monomers. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the researchers were able to obtain well-defined linear and star-shaped polymers with ultrahigh molecular weights. (2020-10-27)

Glutathione precursor GlyNAC reverses premature aging in people with HIV
Supplementation of precursors of glutathione, a major antioxidant produced by the body, improves multiple deficits associated with premature aging in people with HIV. (2020-10-15)

New nanotechology design provides hope for personalized vaccination for treating cancer
A new study demonstrates the use of charged nanoscale metal-organic frameworks for generating free radicals using X-rays within tumor tissue to kill cancer cells directly. Furthermore, the same frameworks can be used for delivering immune signaling molecules known as PAMPs to activate the immune response against tumor cells. By combining these two approaches into one easily administered ''vaccine,'' this new technology may provide the key to better local and systemic treatment of difficult-to-treat cancers. (2020-10-02)

New study finds novel functions of the pyruvate-sensing protein PdhR in E. Coli
Scientists at Meiji University, Hosei University, and Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) aimed to better understand the homeostasis of pyruvate, a key connection point of many metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli bacteria. Scientists focused on a transcription factor called PdhR because it regulates pyruvate breakdown into other molecules. They identified ~20 genes that PdhR targets, and showed their involvement in pathways connected to pyruvate. (2020-09-28)

Insect Armageddon: low doses of the insecticide, Imidacloprid, cause blindness in insects
Joint research provides important evidence on the role of insecticides on the longevity of insect population. (2020-09-28)

Ascorbic acid-mediated reactions in organic synthesis
In this review, we report ascorbic acid-catalyzed reactions in organic synthesis. Several examples are included in this review to demonstrate that ascorbic acid is a versatile catalyst for the synthesis of diverse organic compounds. (2020-09-25)

A multishot lensless camera in development could aid disease diagnosis
A new type of imaging that does not require a lens and uses reconfigurable particle-based masks to take multiple shots of an object is being developed by researchers at Penn State. The electric-field directed self-assembling mask technology is expected to have uses in lower-cost and faster disease diagnosis, the enhancement of optical microscopy, and may even lead to thinner cellphone technology. (2020-09-23)

Newly discovered mechanism regulates myocardial distensibility
A team of researchers headed by M√ľnster University physiologist Prof. Wolfgang Linke has shown that oxidative stress, in combination with the extension of the heart walls, triggers a change in cardiac stiffness. A key role is played by the giant protein titin. This newly discovered mechanism is relevant, for example, in cases of an acute heart attack or chronic heart disease. The results have been published in the journal 'PNAS'. (2020-09-15)

Iron is to blame for carbon dioxide emissions from soil, says a soil scientists from RUDN
Iron minerals and bacteria can be the main agents of carbon dioxide emissions from the soil. A soil scientist from RUDN University made this conclusion after studying the process of organic plant waste decomposition of the micro-level. Iron and hydrogen peroxide enter into a reaction, as a result of which active oxygen forms (oxygen radicals) are formed. The radicals destroy plant waste in the soil and promote carbon dioxide emissions. (2020-09-09)

Research brief: New insight on the impacts of Earth's biosphere on air quality
A new study provides the first global satellite measurements of one of the most important chemicals affecting Earth's atmosphere. (2020-09-09)

Vitamin D levels in the blood can predict future health risks and death
Free, circulating vitamin D levels in the blood may be a better predictor of future health risks in aging men, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. These data suggest the free, precursor form of vitamin D found circulating in the bloodstream is a more accurate predictor of future health and disease risk, than the often measured total vitamin D. (2020-09-07)

Bus drivers more likely to let white customers ride for free
A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that bus drivers are more likely to let white riders ride for free and less likely to let Black riders ride without paying the fee. (2020-09-02)

Nanomaterials based strategies for treatment of hypoxic tumor
Hypoxic tumor microenvironment restricts efficiency of tumor therapies and leads to serious results of tumor recurrence and high mortality. Different strategies to treat hypoxic tumors based on nanomaterials have been utilized to eliminate the side effects of hypoxia on tumor therapies. The strategies could be summarized into two classes, i) elevating oxygen level in tumor by nanomaterials and ii) diminishing oxygen dependence of nanomaterials for hypoxic tumor therapy. (2020-08-31)

A chiral surprise in the rainforest
Reversed ratio of chiral volatile organic compounds over the Amazon rainforest reveal insects as unexplored important source of forest emissions. (2020-08-27)

How vitamin C could help over 50s retain muscle mass
New research shows that vitamin C could help over 50s retain muscle mass in later life. The new study shows that older people who eat plenty of vitamin C - commonly found in citrus fruits, berries and vegetables - have the best skeletal muscle mass. This is important because people tend to lose skeletal muscle mass as they get older - leading to sarcopenia (a condition characterised by loss of skeletal muscle mass and function), frailty and reduced quality of life. (2020-08-26)

High fructose diet in pregnancy impacts metabolism of offspring, study finds
An increased level of fructose intake during pregnancy can cause significant changes in maternal metabolic function and milk composition and alter the metabolism of their offspring, researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, have found. (2020-08-18)

Pancake bonding as a new tool to construct novel metal based magnetic materials
A Canadian-Finnish collaboration has led to the discovery of a novel magnetic compound in which two magnetic dysprosium metal ions are bridged by two aromatic organic radicals forming a pancake bond. The results of this study can be utilized to improve the magnetic properties of similar compounds. The research results were published in the well-recognized chemistry journal - Inorganic Chemistry Frontiers in July 2020 - with the cover art. (2020-08-13)

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