Current Friction News and Events

Current Friction News and Events, Friction News Articles.
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Swimming upstream on sound waves
ETH researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine. (2021-02-19)

Nanotechnologies reduce friction and improve durability of materials
A team of scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Immanuel Kant Baltic State Federal University suggested using innovative thin films to considerably reduce friction and thus increase the durability of surfaces in mechanisms. This discovery can be important for many fields, from medicine to space technologies. (2021-02-16)

UMass Amherst team helps demonstrate spontaneous quantum error correction
Published by the journal Nature, research co-authored by University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Chen Wang, graduate students Jeffrey Gertler and Shruti Shirol, and postdoctoral researcher Juliang Li takes a step toward building a fault-tolerant quantum computer. They have realized a novel type of QEC where the quantum errors are spontaneously corrected. (2021-02-11)

Snake micro scales reveal secrets of sidewinding and slithering
The mesmerizing flow of a sidewinder moving obliquely across desert sands has captivated biologists for centuries and has been variously studied over the years, but questions remained about how the snakes produce their unique motion. (2021-02-02)

A little friction goes a long way toward stronger nanotube fibers
Carbon nanotube fibers are not nearly as strong as the nanotubes they contain, but Rice University researchers are working to close the gap with a computational model that shows nanotube length and the friction between them are equal contributors. (2021-01-19)

How cells move and don't get stuck
Theoretical physicists from Berlin teamed up with experimental physicists from Munich to determine the precise mechanics involved in cell motility. The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2021-01-18)

Scrambled supersolids
Supersolids are fluid and solid at the same time. Physicists from Innsbruck and Geneva have for the first time investigated what happens when such a state is brought out of balance. They discovered a soft form of a solid of high interest for science. As the researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino and Thierry Giamarchi report in Nature Physics, they were also able to reverse the process and restore supersolidity. (2021-01-04)

Big data will analyze the mystery of Beethoven's metronome
Data science and physics research at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and UNED has analysed a centuries-old controversy over Beethoven's annotations about the tempo (the playing speed) of his works, which is considered to be too fast based on these marks. In this study, published in the PLOS ONE journal, it is noted that this deviation could be explained by the composer reading the metronome incorrectly when using it to measure the beat of his symphonies. (2020-12-17)

Oceanographers have an explanation for the Arctic's puzzling ocean turbulence
MIT oceanographers have an explanation for the Arctic's puzzling ocean turbulence: Their study suggests waters will become more turbulent as Arctic loses summertime ice. (2020-12-15)

Two, six, many
Phase transitions describe dramatic changes in properties of a macroscopic system - like the transition from a liquid to a gas. Starting from individual ultracold atoms, Heidelberg University physicists under the direction of Prof. Dr Selim Jochim were able to observe the emergence of such a transition with an increasing number of particles. (2020-12-11)

Physicists capture the sound of a "perfect" fluid
MIT physicists have observed sound waves moving through a ''perfect'' fluid. The results should help scientists study the viscosity in neutron stars, the plasma of the early universe, and other strongly interacting fluids. (2020-12-03)

Building better diffusion models for active systems
Research published in EPJ E has led to new theories detailing how some unusual diffusion behaviours can be reproduced in generalised mathematical models. (2020-11-19)

Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
A new research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed that fish scale arrays generate a streaky base flow on the surface of the animal which yields important clues into reducing drag - the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air - by more than 25 percent. (2020-10-07)

Wasp egg-laying organ inspires new tool to reduce trauma in minimally invasive surgery
A new surgery tool based on the egg-laying organ of parasitic wasps could advance minimally invasive surgery by enabling tissue removal in deeper areas of the body while further minimising trauma and patient recovery time. Researchers at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands based their prototype on the ovipositor of wasps, an ultra-thin flexible organ, which uses friction forces generated by sliding internal blades to achieve efficient transport on a small scale. (2020-09-30)

Talc and petroleum jelly among the best lubricants for people wearing PPE
Talcum powder, a coconut oil-cocoa butter beeswax mixture, and petroleum jelly provide the best skin protection for long-term PPE use, say scientists. (2020-09-24)

How earthquake swarms arise
A new fault simulator maps out how interactions between pressure, friction and fluids rising through a fault zone can lead to slow-motion quakes and seismic swarms. (2020-09-24)

Why there is no speed limit in the superfluid universe
Physicists from Lancaster University have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit; exotic particles that stick to all surfaces in the superfluid. The discovery may guide applications in quantum technology, even quantum computing, where multiple research groups already aim to make use of these unusual particles. (2020-09-21)

Fish, seaweed inspire slippery surfaces for ships
Fish and seaweed secrete a layer of mucus to create a slippery surface, reducing their friction as they travel through water. A potential way to mimic this is by creating lubricant-infused surfaces covered with cavities. As the cavities are continuously filled with the lubricant, a layer is formed over the surface. In the journal Physics of Fluids, researchers in South Korea conducted simulations of this process to help explain the effects. (2020-09-15)

Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study. (2020-09-07)

Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood drive tremors along a segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, Calif., new USC research shows. (2020-09-04)

Dynamic kirigami shoe grip designed to reduce risks of slips and falls
The new kirigami-based shoe sole is intended to reduce the risks of slips and falls by adjusting as a person steps, increasing friction with pop-up spikes as necessary. (2020-08-20)

Researchers capture footage of fluid behaving like a solid
Researchers using a high-speed camera have captured the moments a fluid reacts like a solid, through a new method of fluid observation under pressurized conditions. They examined fluids that have a solid-like response to stress, a phenomenon called Discontinuous Shear Thickening (DST). This is when liquid abruptly thickens and becomes solid when disturbed. DST is being researched for engineering applications such as soft body armor, ''smart'' speed bumps, and food production. (2020-08-14)

How airplanes counteract St. Elmo's Fire during thunderstorms
An MIT study finds windy conditions can weaken St. Elmo's fire, the phenomenon when electrically conductive structures spontaneously emit a flash of blue light, when it's generated by aircraft and other ungrounded objects. (2020-08-11)

Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau
Dome A, the highest ice dome on the Antarctic Plateau, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research by an international team from China, Australia and the University of British Columbia (UBC). The challenge? The location is one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth. (2020-07-29)

Droplet biosensing method opens the door for faster identification of COVID-19
In Cheng and Zhou's method, all of the contents of a sampling droplet can be detected, and there is no extraction or other tedious procedures. (2020-07-21)

Decoding material wear with supercomputers
What happens at the atomic level cannot be observed directly. But now, for the first time, complex computer simulations have become so powerful that wear and friction of real materials can be simulated on an atomic scale. The behavior of surfaces consisting of copper and nickel was simulated with high-performance computers. The results correspond amazingly well with images from electron microscopy -- but they also provide valuable additional information. (2020-06-30)

Researchers design a system to reduce the noise of space rockets in the launch phase
Researchers at the Gandia campus of the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) have developed a new system to reduce the noise of space rockets during the first phases of launching. The prototype was presented by Iván Herrero, Doctor in Mathematics by UPV in his doctoral thesis, and will increase the safety of launching of space vehicles (2020-06-18)

The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling -- and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm. (2020-06-16)

Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe
Duke engineers have developed a comprehensive model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides occurring under varying conditions. The model points to the temperature of a thin layer of clay at the base of the landslide as critical to the potential for sudden cataclysmic failure. The approach is currently monitoring a landslide in Andorra and suggests methods for mitigating the risk of its escalation. (2020-06-15)

Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. This finding, published in Nature, is fundamentally new and important for the earth sciences. (2020-06-11)

Simulations on biologically relevant time scales
Freiburg researchers deliver new insights into molecular mechanisms relevant for drug development. (2020-06-10)

Water vapor in the atmosphere may be prime renewable energy source
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that water vapor in the atmosphere may serve as a potential renewable energy source in the future. (2020-06-09)

Coatings for shoe bottoms could improve traction on slick surfaces
MIT engineers, inspired by kirigami, the Japanese art of paper cutting, have designed a friction-boosting material that could be used to coat the bottom of your shoes, giving them a much stronger grip on ice and other slippery surfaces. (2020-06-01)

Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and MIT have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. The assistive grips could be used, among other things, to reduce the risk of falling among older adults. (2020-06-01)

Visualization of functional components to characterize optimal composite electrodes
Researchers have developed a visualization method that will determine the distribution of components in battery electrodes using atomic force microscopy. The method provides insights into the optimal conditions of composite electrodes and takes us one step closer to being able to manufacture next-generation all-solid-state batteries. (2020-05-21)

Mathematics to keep farmers on track
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology researchers use numerical simulations and frequency response analysis to model the stability of tractors on rough terrain, which may increase farmer safety and promote the automation of agriculture. (2020-05-11)

Thermal tides cause Venus' atmosphere to rotate far faster than its surface
By tracking the thick clouds of Venus' rapidly rotating atmosphere, researchers have gained new insight into the dynamic forces that drive atmospheric super-rotation - a little-understood phenomenon in which an atmosphere rotates much faster than the solid planetary body below. (2020-04-23)

Trade friction: Adaptiveness of swarms of complex networks
Network analysis revealed power-law properties of core and peripheral networks. The USD/JPY exchange rate affected B2B networks by changing structures. (2020-04-17)

Lipid gradient that keeps your eyes wet
New understandings of how lipids function within tears could lead to better drugs for treating dry eye disease. (2020-04-07)

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