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Current Friction News and Events, Friction News Articles.
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Atomic force microscopy reveals high heterogeneity in bacterial membrane vesicles
Researchers at Kanazawa University and Tsukuba University report in Nanoscale that the physical properties of extracellular bacterial membrane vesicles are significantly diverse. The properties for a single type of bacterium as well as for different types are found to be highly heterogeneous. (2020-04-07)

Suffering from skin damage from face masks?
DOCTORS and nurses on the COVID-19 frontline are spending many hours a day wearing face masks, and many members of the general public are doing the same. But although the devices offer invaluable protection, they can cause significant skin damage through sweating and the rubbing of the masks against the nose. Skincare experts at the University of Huddersfield are warning about the risks and suggesting remedies. (2020-04-03)

Experiments lead to slip law for better forecasts of glacier speed, sea-level rise
Backed by experimental data from a laboratory machine that simulates the huge forces involved in glacier flow, glaciologists have written an equation that accounts for the motion of ice that rests on the soft, deformable ground underneath unusually fast-moving parts of ice sheets. Models using the equation -- a 'slip law' -- could better predict how quickly glaciers are sliding, how much ice they're sending to oceans and how that would affect sea-level rise. (2020-04-02)

New 'law' to explain how glaciers flow over soft ground
Addressing a major source of uncertainty in glacier-flow models, researchers present a new slip law to describe glaciers sliding on soft, deformable material. (2020-04-02)

Why does your cotton towel get stiff after natural drying?
The remaining 'bound water' on cotton surfaces cross-link single fibers of cotton, causing hardening after natural drying, according to a new study conducted by Kao Corporation and Hokkaido University. This provides new insight into unique water behaviors on material surfaces and helps us develop better cleaning technologies. (2020-03-27)

Going super small to get super strong metals
Metals get stronger as the size of the grains making up the metal get smaller -- up to a point. If the grains are smaller than 10 nanometers in diameter the materials are weaker because, it was thought, they slide past each other like sand sliding down a dune. But in samples of nickel with grain diameters as small as 3 nanometers, and under high pressures, the strength of the samples continued to increase with smaller grain sizes. (2020-02-24)

Scientists predict state of matter that can conduct both electricity and energy perfectly
Three scientists from the University of Chicago have run the numbers, and they believe there may be a way to make a material that could conduct both electricity and energy with 100% efficiency--never losing any to heat or friction. (2020-02-20)

Army researchers develop new method for analyzing metal
Warfighters on the battlefield often rely on machines, vehicles and other technologies with rotating parts to complete their mission. Army researchers have devised a new method of testing for a major factor in equipment failure and breakdown in order to ensure that those tools meet the proper standard of quality. (2020-02-12)

Static electricity as strong as lightening can be saved in a battery
Prof. Dong Sung Kim and his joint research team presented a new technology that can increase the amount of power generated by a triboelectric nanogenerator. The research team developed a high-efficiency integrated circuit to obtain reliable and practical electrical energy from the triboelectric nanogenerator. (2020-02-06)

Going with the flow: New insights into mysterious fluid motions
Scientists gain a deeper understanding of turbulent and transitional pipe flows. (2020-01-24)

'Melting rock' models predict mechanical origins of earthquakes
Engineers at Duke University have devised a model that can predict the early mechanical behaviors and origins of an earthquake in multiple types of rock. The model provides new insights into unobservable phenomena that take place miles beneath the Earth's surface under incredible pressures and temperatures, and could help researchers better predict earthquakes -- or even, at least theoretically, attempt to stop them. (2020-01-17)

Designing better nursing care with robots
Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan. To help improve the safety and efficacy of robotic care, the scientists have developed a control method that could help robots better replicate human movement when lifting and moving a patient. They published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica. (2020-01-15)

Slow-motion interplate slip detected in the Nankai Trough near Japan
Japanese researchers used a Global Navigation Satellite System-Acoustic ranging combination technique to detect signals due to slow slip events in the Nankai Trough with seafloor deformations of 5 cm or more and durations on the order of one year. These events generally occurred on the shallow sides of regions with strong interplate coupling and represent variations in interplate friction conditions, which may help simulate the occurrence of megathrust earthquakes originating from this subduction zone and contribute earthquake disaster prevention. (2020-01-15)

Surprising beauty found in bacterial cultures
Researchers at University of California San Diego have discovered that when certain microbes pair up, stunning floral patterns emerge. (2020-01-14)

Planet WASP-12b is on a death spiral, say Princeton scientists
A Princeton-led team of astrophysicists has shown that exoplanet WASP-12b, located 600 light-years away, is spiraling in toward certain destruction in about 3 million years. 'Ever since the discovery of the first 'hot Jupiter' in 1995 -- a discovery that was recognized with this year's Nobel Prize in Physics -- we have wondered how long such planets can survive,' said Prof. Joshua Winn. (2020-01-08)

Color-changing fiber and theory reveal fundamental mystery of knots
Color-changing fibers and mathematical theory combine to disclose the simple rules that govern the strength and stability of commonly used knots, researchers report. (2020-01-02)

NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape
NUS Mechanobiology Institute researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns -- also known as chevron patterns -- in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemical pathways but actually require physical forces to correctly develop. (2019-12-22)

Ben-Gurion University researchers develop new method to remove dust on solar panels
Particle removal increased from 41% on hydrophilic smooth Si wafers to 98% on superhydrophobic Si-based nanotextured surfaces. The researchers confirmed these results by measuring the adhesion of a micron-sized particle to the flat and nanotextured substrate using an atomic force microscope. They found that the adhesion in water is reduced by a factor of 30. (2019-12-09)

Successful instrument guidance through deep and convoluted blood vessel networks
Researchers have developed a novel approach to tackling one of the biggest challenges of endovascular surgery: how to reach the most difficult-to-access physiological locations. Their solution is a robotic platform that uses the fringe field generated by the superconducting magnet of a clinical MRI scanner to guide medical instruments through deeper and more complex vascular structures. The approach has been successfully demonstrated in-vivo, and is the subject of an article just published in Science Robotics. (2019-12-03)

UBC research highlights need to safeguard drones and robotic cars against cyber attacks
UBC researchers executed successful stealth attacks on real and simulated robotic vehicles, revealing vulnerabilities in the attack detection system most commonly used by such vehicles. (2019-11-27)

Novel tactile display using computer-controlled surface adhesion
Touch surfaces have become ubiquitous and enable users to intuitively manipulate the displayed contents with their fingers. One limitation is that they cannot represent various types of surface states of real objects such as texture. Here, a research team led by experts from Osaka University proposes StickyTouch, a novel tactile display that represents adhesive information on a surface. Adhesion control can be achieved by a temperature sensitive adhesive sheet whose temperature is locally controlled. (2019-11-25)

Alpine rock axeheads became social and economic exchange fetishes in the Neolithic
The mechanical capacity to resist successive transformation processes gave these rocks an exceptional exchange value that favoured the formation of long-distance exchange networks in Western Europe, according to a study led by the UAB that integrates petrography, materials science and paleoeconomics. (2019-11-14)

When bubbles bounce back
Ultrapure solvents prove there is more than meets the eye when oil and water mix. (2019-11-13)

How Let's Encrypt doubled the internet's percentage of secure websites in four years
A Q&A with J. Alex Halderman, who co-founded the nonprofit organization behind what's now the world's largest certificate authority. (2019-11-13)

Why is ice so slippery
The answer lies in a film of water that is generated by friction, one that is far thinner than expected and much more viscous than usual water through its resemblance to the 'snow cones' of crushed ice we drink during the summer. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated by researchers from the CNRS and ENS-PSL, with support from the École polytechnique, in a study that appeared in Physical Review X on Nov. 4, 2019 (2019-11-05)

Pushy robots learn the fundamentals of object manipulation
MIT researchers have compiled a dataset that captures the detailed behavior of a robotic system physically pushing hundreds of different objects. Using the dataset -- the largest and most diverse of its kind -- researchers can train robots to 'learn' pushing dynamics that are fundamental to many complex object-manipulation tasks, including reorienting and inspecting objects, and uncluttering scenes. (2019-10-22)

How to control friction in topological insulators
Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists at the University of Basel and the Istanbul Technical University have begun investigating how they react to friction. Their experiment shows that the heat generated through friction is significantly lower than in conventional materials. This is due to a new quantum mechanism, the researchers report in the scientific journal Nature Materials. (2019-10-14)

Inspired by Northern clingfish, researchers make a better suction cup
A University of Washington team inspired by the clingfish's suction power set out to develop an artificial suction cup that borrows from nature's design. Their prototype, described in a paper published Sept. 9 in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, actually performed better than the clingfish. (2019-10-01)

Material for nuclear reactors to become harder
Scientists from NUST MISIS developed a unique composite material that can be used in harsh temperature conditions, such as those in nuclear reactors. The microhardness of the sandwich material is 3 times higher compared to the microhardness of its individual components. These properties withstand temperatures up to 700°?. The results of the research are published in Materials Letters. (2019-09-30)

Solving the longstanding mystery of how friction leads to static electricity
A Northwestern University team developed a new model, which shows that rubbing two objects together produces static electricity, or triboelectricity, by bending the tiny protrusions on the surface of materials. (2019-09-11)

Remora-inspired suction disk mimics fish's adhesion ability, offers evolutionary insight
NJIT researchers offer new insight into the evolution of the suction ability of remora fishes, showcasing a bioinspired suction disk that mimics, and can exceed, the fish's uncanny powers of adhesion. (2019-09-03)

Robotic thread is designed to slip through the brain's blood vessels
MIT engineers have developed a magnetically steerable, thread-like robot that can actively glide through narrow, winding pathways, such as the labrynthine vasculature of the brain. (2019-08-28)

Researchers get first microscopic look at a tiny phenomenon with big potential implications
Matter behaves differently when it's tiny. At the nanoscale, electric current cuts through mountains of particles, spinning them into vortexes that can be used intentionally in quantum computing. The particles arrange themselves into a topological map, but the lines blur as electrons merge into indistinguishable quasiparticles with shifting properties. The trick is learning how to control such changeable materials. (2019-08-22)

Stanford researchers explain earthquakes we can't feel
Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks' pores. (2019-08-21)

Innovative valve train saves 20% fuel
Empa has developed an innovative, electrohydraulically actuated valve train for internal combustion engines, that enables completely free adjustment of stroke and timing, while at the same time being robust and cost effective. This valve train was mounted on a serial production engine and has been running successfully for several months. The new technology saves up to 20% fuel. (2019-08-19)

Development of flexible sensors mimicking human finger skin by DGIST
Senior Researcher Changsoon Choi's team at DGIST and Dr. Sungwoo Chun at SKKU developed a new tactile sensor mimicking human skin. Can recognize more sensitive tactile than the existing sensors... Expected to contribute greatly to the development of artificial skin. (2019-08-06)

Chameleon-inspired structural color soft robot can interact with environment
A novel structural color soft robot with both color-changing and locomotion capabilities has been developed by a research team led by Dr. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2019-07-31)

Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts
American Journal of Roentgenology researchers used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur. (2019-07-24)

Robot control system for grasping and releasing objects under both dry and wet conditions
A control system for deformable robot-fingertips was developed for grasping and releasing objects. Previously developed robot fingertips with high friction texture can stably grasp a paper box, a soft object under both dry and wet conditions. By injecting a lubricant (absolute ethanol) the grasped object slipped downwards without changing the position of the robot fingertips. The current controlling system using lubricant could be applied to robot tasks in a narrow space. (2019-07-16)

Equations help predict the behavior of water in rivers
University of Cordoba researchers developed a mathematical model that allows for anticipating the failure of dikes that hold in overflowing river water. (2019-07-02)

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