Nav: Home

Current Frog News and Events | Page 2

Current Frog News and Events, Frog News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 16 | 612 Results
Females prefer city frogs' tunes
Urban sophistication has real sex appeal -- at least if you're a Central American amphibian. (2018-12-10)
'Old-fashioned fieldwork' puts new frog species on the map
Months of old-fashioned fieldwork helped define the range and unique characteristics of the recently discovered Atlantic Coast leopard frog. (2018-11-26)
Frogs breed young to beat virus
Frogs from groups exposed to a deadly virus are breeding at younger ages, new research suggests. (2018-11-20)
Location, location, location
In a box, within a canister, surrounded by snow, tucked tightly into a backpack strapped to one determined ecologist. (2018-11-19)
Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter
A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. (2018-11-08)
UCSC chemists develop safe alternatives to phthalates used in plastics
Researchers have developed safer alternatives to the phthalate plasticizers used to enhance the suppleness, flexibility, and longevity of plastics. (2018-10-31)
Do neonicotinoids inhibit the development of anti-predatory behaviors in wood frogs?
Wood frogs are a bit more sluggish when exposed to neonicotinoids. (2018-10-25)
Invasive species in an ecosystem harm native organisms but aid other invasive species
The presence of an invasive species in an ecosystem makes native organisms more susceptible to pollutants and may encourage the spread of additional invasive species, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-10-23)
Tropical frogs found to coexist with deadly fungus
In 2004, the frogs of El Copé, Panama, began dying by the thousands. (2018-10-03)
What doesn't kill you
After suffering mass mortality for years due to infection with the deadly Batrachochytrium dendrobatridis fungus, or chytrid, some frog populations in El Copé, Panama, now seem to be co-existing with the pathogen and stabilizing their populations. (2018-10-03)
Scientists get new tool to track new pathogen killing frogs
An undergraduate researcher has developed a method to screen frogs for an infectious disease that has been linked to mass die-offs of frogs around the world. (2018-08-14)
Cellular self-destruction at 30 micrometers per minute
Like a wildfire spreading through a dry field, for cells, death comes in an unrelenting wave. (2018-08-09)
In apoptosis, cell death spreads through perpetuating waves, Stanford study finds
In a cell, death is akin to falling dominoes: One death-inducing molecule activates another, and so on, until the entire cell is shut down, a new Stanford study finds. (2018-08-09)
Neurobiology: Finding one's way home
The otic placode gives rise to the inner ear in vertebrates. (2018-07-26)
Endocrine-disrupting pesticides impair frog reproduction
In a new study, researchers from Sweden and Britain have investigated how the endocrine-disrupting substance linuron affects reproduction in the West African clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis. (2018-06-14)
Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests
99-million-year-old amber fossils from Myanmar provide the earliest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests. (2018-06-14)
Fish 'umbrella' protects stem cells from sun
Stem cells that make blood cells in fish flourish in the shade provided by a newly discovered cellular 'umbrella' that keeps them safe from UV damage. (2018-06-13)
Why we make blood cells in our bones
In humans and other mammals, the stem cells that give rise to all blood cells are located in the bone. (2018-06-13)
Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian species
A fungal pathogen which has led to the extinction of entire species in South America has been recorded for the first time in critically endangered amphibians in India. (2018-06-12)
Bright warning colors on poison dart frogs also act as camouflage
Poison dart frogs are well known for their deadly toxins and bright colors, which have made them a classic example of warning coloration. (2018-06-04)
Vocal neurons encode evolution of frog calls
A study of two closely related frog species reveals a population of neurons that give rise to the unique mating calls of each species. (2018-05-21)
Global trade spreads deadly frog disease from Asia
New research has revealed a deadly disease that threatens the survival of the world's frogs originated from East Asia, and global trade was almost certainly responsible for the disease's spread. (2018-05-10)
An eye toward regeneration
UNLV scientist Kelly Tseng, Ph.D. and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans. (2018-04-18)
Study reveals declining central American frog species are bouncing back
For more than 40 years, frog populations around the world have been declining. (2018-04-11)
'Frogs' and 'mushrooms' bubble up in quantum fluids
Quantum fluids may mix in very weird ways, according to new computer simulations of exotic states of matter known as Bose-Einstein condensates. (2018-04-04)
Scientists found a new genus and species of frogs
A team of scientists from MSU and their foreign colleagues discovered a previously unknown species and genus of batrachians Siamophryne troglodytes. (2018-03-29)
Fat-sensing hormone helps control tadpole metamorphosis
When tadpoles are but tadpoles, they're voracious eaters, chomping down all of the plant matter in their paths. (2018-03-29)
What stops mass extinctions?
What slows or stops a disease epidemic if the pathogen is still present? (2018-03-29)
Signalling study sheds light on conditions from alopecia to cancer
Researchers from the University of Dundee and the Francis Crick Institute have made a significant discovery about a cellular pathway associated with developmental defects and a myriad of diseases ranging from alopecia to colorectal cancer. (2018-03-22)
Predators learn to identify prey from other species
Predatory bats learn both from other members of their own species and from other predatory bat species. (2018-03-21)
Five new species of frogs identified in museum collections
Researchers from Yale-NUS College and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences have discovered five new species of Southeast Asian frogs from a group of museum specimens that was believed to only contain two species. (2018-03-19)
These tropical hummingbirds make cricket-like sounds other birds can't hear
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on March 5 have found that a tropical species of hummingbird called a black jacobin makes vocal sounds with an unusually high-frequency pitch that falls outside birds' normal hearing range. (2018-03-05)
Devoted frog fathers guard their eggs from predators
A study led by PhD candidate Mr K. S. Seshadri from the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Science has revealed that male white-spotted bush frogs (Raochestes chalazodes) dedicatedly guard their fertilised eggs from other cannibalistic male frogs and predators. (2018-02-07)
Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)
Missing in action
A UCSB ecologist unearths the foothill yellow-legged frog's past in order to inform its future. (2018-01-25)
Frogs reveal mechanism that determines viability of hybrids
Why are some hybrids viable and others not? It is known that this depends on the father species and the mother species. (2018-01-10)
Making waves
New approach enables measurements of changes in thousands of proteins in the minutes after frog eggs are fertilized, revealing previously opaque mechanisms such as how the destruction of a small number of proteins releases the 'brakes' on an egg's cell cycle. (2017-12-21)
Study: Suburban ponds are a septic buffet
A new study shows that human waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds. (2017-12-12)
The unique pentraxin-carbonic anhydrase protein regulates the ability of fish to swim
A study carried out at the University of Tampere has shown that carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI) is present in some species as a combination of two proteins. (2017-12-07)
Neurobiology: Fixated on food?
Contrast has an impact on the optokinetic reflex, which enables us to clearly perceive the landscape from a moving train. (2017-11-20)
Page 2 of 16 | 612 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...