Current Frogs News and Events

Current Frogs News and Events, Frogs News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 18 | 703 Results
Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
A University of California, Berkeley, conservationist has discovered that the glass frog Sachatamia orejuela can be added to the list of species that make use of visual cues in response to their acoustic environments. This is the first time a member of the glass frog family (Centrolenidae) has been observed using visual communication in this manner. (2021-01-15)

Invasive in the U.S., lifesaver Down Under
New research reveals monitor lizards should be regarded as ''ecosystem engineers'' as they provide food and shelter to other reptiles, insects and mammals, helping prevent extinction. (2020-12-21)

Beavers may help amphibians threatened by climate change
A study of pond sites in the Cascades found greater amphibian diversity in sites with beaver damns. Red-legged frogs and northwestern salamanders, which develop more slowly, were detected almost exclusively in dammed sites. (2020-12-08)

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report. (2020-11-05)

Surprised researchers: Number of leopards in northern China on the rise
Most of the world's leopards are endangered and generally, the number of these shy and stunning cats is decreasing. However, according to a recent study by a researcher from University of Copenhagen and colleagues from China, leopard populations in northern China are on the mend. Discover why below. (2020-10-26)

DNA in fringe-lipped bat poop reveals unexpected eating habits
By examining the poop of the fringe-lipped bat (Trachops cirrhosus), a team at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) encountered surprising results about its eating habits and foraging abilities. (2020-10-22)

New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution. The scientists Kenji Fukushima and David D. Pollock report this finding in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-08)

Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA
Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil. (2020-09-08)

Do big tadpoles turn into big frogs? It's complicated, study finds
University of Arizona researchers studied the evolution of the body sizes of frogs and their tadpoles. They found that the two life stages do not evolve completely independently of each other as previously thought. (2020-09-03)

How to get the upper body of a burrowing frog
If you want shredded pecs, you should train like a burrowing frog. Though famously round, these diggers are the unsung bodybuilders of the frog world. (2020-09-01)

Hots dogs, chicken wings and city living helped wetland wood storks thrive
Using the Wood Stork, researchers compared city storks with natural wetland storks to gauge their success in urban environments based on their diet and food opportunities. Results provide evidence of how a wetland species persists and even thrives in an urban environment by switching to human foods like chicken wings and hots dogs when natural marshes are in bad shape. These findings indicate that urban areas can buffer a species from the unpredictability of natural food sources. (2020-08-31)

Primary care at a crossroads: Experts call for change
Primary care providers have experienced a rise in responsibilities with little or no increase in the time they have to get it all done, or reduction in the number of patients assigned to them. In two new papers, researchers look at issues facing them and offer frameworks for improvement. (2020-08-24)

Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals
Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases. This review examines the behavioral responses to emerging diseases across the animal kingdom from frogs and wolves to lobsters, bats, and humans. The paper also addresses whether or not technology helps when it comes to dealing with humans and social distancing. (2020-08-12)

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds
Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. They then examined the reproductive development of their young by assessing their growth and development to establish that the herbicide is causing major abnormalities in the male reproductive system in many animals. (2020-08-05)

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system
Some prey species can escape from inside a predator after a successful attack. Kobe University ecologist Sugiura Shinji has found that the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata can actively escape from the vent of the frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus via the digestive system. This is the first time that research has documented the active escape of prey from the body of a predator after being eaten. (2020-08-03)

Research breakthrough in fight against chytrid fungus
For frogs dying of the invasive chytridiomycosis disease, the leading cause of amphibian deaths worldwide, the genes responsible for protecting them may actually be leading to their demise, according to a new study published today in the journal Molecular Ecology by University of Central Florida and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) researchers. (2020-07-23)

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool. (2020-07-15)

Green is more than skin-deep for hundreds of frog species
The through-and-through greenness of hundreds of frog species that can be found deep in their lymphatic fluid, soft tissues and even bones, comes from a clever biochemical workaround that combines a normally virus-fighting type of protein with a toxic byproduct of blood breakdown. The camouflage innovation has happened at least 40 times across 11 families of frog and toad. (2020-07-13)

'Fang'tastic: researchers report amphibians with snake-like dental glands
Utah State University biologist Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. and colleagues from Brazil's Butantan Institute describe oral glands in a family of terrestrial caecilians, serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders. (2020-07-03)

Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves from predators
New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colours throughout their lives to avoid predators. For years it has been thought that animals living in the same environment -- like nymphs and adults of the same species -- should use similar warning colours, not different ones. (2020-06-25)

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar
Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. More new species are constantly being discovered, often within already well-studied areas. So, in one of the relatively well-studied parks in northern Madagascar, a new species of diamond frog, Rhombophryne ellae, was found in 2017. Now, the discovery is published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2020-06-16)

'Social distancing' saves frogs: New approach to identify individual frogs noninvasively
Amphibians possess diverse colour patterns and body markings that can be used to identify individuals, just like fingerprints for humans. This is how Naitik Patel and Dr Abhijit Das came up with one of the very first non-invasive techniques to identify individual frogs using a biometric software. Their protocol, recently published in the open-access journal Herpetozoa, allows for the rapid estimation of frog populations. Thus, it is meant to aid conservation of many endangered amphibians. (2020-06-08)

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat
Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog -- could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia. (2020-06-04)

Tiger snakes tell more about local wetlands' pollution levels
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats -- critical, local ecosystems -- are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result. (2020-06-02)

A new Critically Endangered frog named after 'the man from the floodplain full of frogs'
A new species of a Critically Endangered miniaturised stump-toed frog of the genus Stumpffia found in Madagascar is named Stumpffia froschaueri after ''the man from the floodplain full of frogs'', Christoph Froschauer. The namesake of the new frog is famous for being the first, and European-wide renowned, printer from Zürich, famous for printing ''Historia animalium'' and the ''Zürich Bible''. The finding is published in the peer-reviewed open-access journal Zookeys. (2020-05-25)

Bristol scientists see through glass frogs' translucent camouflage
Glass frogs are well known for their see-through skin but, until now, the reason for this curious feature has received no experimental attention. A team of scientists from the University of Bristol, McMaster University, and Universidad de Las Américas Quito, sought to establish the ecological importance of glass frog translucency and, in doing so, have revealed a novel form of camouflage. (2020-05-25)

Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
A new report from Kyoto University shows that freezing in action when a snake and frog face off is not about fear but rather a delicate waiting game of patience, with each animal waiting for and anticipating its opponent's actions. (2020-05-11)

Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors. (2020-05-06)

Amphibian study shows stress increases vulnerability to virus
Researchers found that wood frogs, known for their ability to survive being frozen through, are more susceptible to lethal ranavirus infections if they have been raised in ponds high in salinity from road deicer. The findings lend more weight to the stress-induced susceptibility hypothesis, which could help explain dramatic wildlife population declines in recent years. (2020-05-05)

Palaeontology: Fossil frogs offer insights into ancient Antarctica
The discovery of the earliest known modern amphibians in Antarctica provides further evidence of a warm and temperate climate in the Antarctic Peninsula before its separation from the southern supercontinent, Gondwana. The fossils, which belong to the family of helmeted frogs, are described in Scientific Reports this week. (2020-04-23)

Promiscuity in the Paleozoic: Researchers uncover clues about vertebrate evolution
By looking at the DNA of living animals, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, alongside an international team of collaborators, have revealed early events in vertebrate evolution, including how jawed vertebrates arose from the mating of two different species of primitive fish half a billion years ago. (2020-04-20)

Coquí fossil from Puerto Rico takes title of oldest Caribbean frog
The bright chirp of the coquí frog, the national symbol of Puerto Rico, has likely resounded through Caribbean forests for at least 29 million years. A fossil arm bone from a frog in the genus Eleutherodactylus is the oldest record of frogs in the Caribbean and, fittingly, was discovered on the island where coquís are most beloved. (2020-04-07)

Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. This new knowledge may help protect vulnerable bird species. (2020-04-01)

How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. In a Review publishing March 30 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Andreas Nieder, a neurobiologist at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, explores the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the impact on their survival, arguing that we won't fully understand the influence of numerical competence unless we study it directly. (2020-03-30)

Skulls gone wild: How and why some frogs evolved extreme heads
Beneath slick skin, some frogs sport spines, spikes and other skeletal secrets. A new study is the first to take a close look at the evolution and function of extreme frog skulls. (2020-03-23)

Zoology: Biofluorescence may be widespread among amphibians
Biofluorescence, where organisms emit a fluorescent glow after absorbing light energy, may be widespread in amphibians including salamanders and frogs, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Biofluorescence had previously been observed in only one salamander and three frog species. (2020-02-27)

USU herpetologist reports surprising evolutionary shift in snakes
A multi-national team of scientists reports a case of a vertebrate predator switching from a vertebrate prey to an invertebrate prey for the selective advantage of obtaining the same chemical class of defensive toxins. (2020-02-24)

USask study reveals origin of endangered Colombian poison frog hybrids
The origin of an understudied hybrid population of poisonous frogs -- highly endangered colorful animals that live deep in the Colombian jungle -- is the result of natural breeding and not caused by wildlife traffickers moving them, a University of Saskatchewan (USask) study shows. (2020-02-18)

When frogs die off, snake diversity plummets
A new study in the journal Science, shows that the snake community become more homogenized and the number of species declined dramatically after chytrid fungus decimated frog populations in a remote forest in Panama. (2020-02-13)

The curious case of the disappearing snakes
A Michigan State University- and University of Maryland-led study featured on the cover of this week's Science magazine should sound alarm bells regarding the ''biodiversity crisis'' or the loss of wildlife around the world. (2020-02-13)

Page 1 of 18 | 703 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.