Current Galileo News and Events

Current Galileo News and Events, Galileo News Articles.
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Researchers model source of eruption on Jupiter's moon Europa
A new model shows how brine on Jupiter's moon Europa can migrate within the icy shell to form pockets of salty water that erupt to the surface when freezing. The findings, which are important for the upcoming Europa Clipper mission, may explain cryovolcanic eruptions across icy bodies in the solar system. (2020-11-10)

Huge ring-like structure on Ganymede's surface may have been caused by violent impact
Image data reanalysis by researchers from Kobe University and the National Institute of Technology, Oshima College have revealed that ancient tectonic troughs are concentrically distributed across almost the entire surface of Ganymede. Computer simulation results suggest that this giant crater could have resulted from the impact of an asteroid with a 150km radius. If so, this the largest impact structure identified in the solar system so far. (2020-08-07)

Ammonia sparks unexpected, exotic lightning on Jupiter
NASA's Juno spacecraft -- orbiting and closely observing the planet Jupiter -- has unexpectedly discovered lightning in the planet's upper atmosphere, according to a multi-institutional study led by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). (2020-08-05)

To find giant black holes, start with Jupiter
On a quest to find the Universe's largest black holes, Vanderbilt researcher identifies the center of the solar system within 100 meters. (2020-06-30)

Trapping versus dropping atoms expands 'interrogation' to 20 seconds
Trapped atoms, suspended aloft on a lattice of laser light for as long as 20 seconds, allow for highly sensitive measurements of gravity, according to a new study, which describes a new approach to atom interferometers. (2019-11-07)

Analysis of Galileo's Jupiter entry probe reveals gaps in heat shield modeling
The entry probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter entered the planet's atmosphere in 1995 in fiery fashion, generating enough heat to cause plasma reactions on its surface. The data relayed about the burning of its heat shield differed from the effects predicted in fluid dynamics models, and new work examines what might have caused such a discrepancy. Researchers report their findings from new fluid radiative dynamics models in this week's Physics of Fluids. (2019-10-15)

The atmosphere of a new ultra hot Jupiter is analyzed
The combination of observations made with the CARMENES spectrograph on the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería), and the HARPS-N spectrograph on the National Galileo Telescope (TNG) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma) has enabled a team from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and from the University of La Laguna (ULL) to reveal new details about this extrasolar planet, which has a surface temperature of around 2000 K. (2019-06-12)

Table salt compound spotted on Europa
New insight on Europa's geochemistry was hiding in the visible spectrum. (2019-06-12)

Massive collision in the planetary system Kepler 107
Two of the planets which are orbiting the star Kepler 107 could be the result of an impact similar to that which affected the Earth to produce the moon. An international team whose members include a researcher from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias and the University of La Laguna, are publishing the results of this work today in the journal Nature Astronomy. (2019-02-06)

How does a quantum particle see the world?
Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences proved that whether an object (in our example, the ball) shows quantum features depends on the reference frame. The physical laws, however, are still independent of it. The results are published in Nature Communications. (2019-01-30)

UMass Amherst Researchers offer new physics rule to find mechanical strain
Addressing a physics problem that dates back to Galileo, three University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers this week propose a new approach to the theory of how thin sheets can be forced to conform to 'geometrically incompatible' shapes -- think gift-wrapping a basketball -- that relies on weaving together two fundamental ideas of geometry and mechanics that were long thought to be irreconcilable. (2019-01-08)

SwRI solar activity research provides insight into sun's past, future
A team led by Southwest Research Institute has developed a new technique for looking at historic solar data to distinguish trustworthy observations from those that should be used with care. This work is critical to understanding the sun's past and future as well as whether solar activity plays a role in climate change. (2018-12-10)

Icy moon of Jupiter, Ganymede, shows evidence of past strike-slip faulting
A recently published study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology reveals Ganymede, an icy moon of Jupiter, appears to have undergone complex periods of geologic activity, specifically strike-slip tectonism, as is seen in Earth's San Andreas fault. (2018-10-09)

The cart before the horse: A new model of cause and effect
In a recent paper in Nature Communications, scientists led by Albert C. Yang, M.D., Ph.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, introduce a new approach to causality that moves away from this temporally linear model of cause and effect. (2018-09-28)

Astronomers use Earth's natural history as guide to spot vegetation on new worlds
By looking at Earth's full natural history and evolution, astronomers may have found a template for vegetation fingerprints -- borrowing from epochs of changing flora -- to determine the age of habitable exoplanets. (2018-09-24)

A new frame for the sky
The sky gets a new reference frame. On Aug. 30 the International Astronomical Union adopted the International Celestial Reference Frame 3 (ICRF-3) during their general assembly in Vienna, Austria. As of Jan. 1, 2019, this reference frame has global validity. It serves for example for the orientation of GPS systems as well as the navigation of space probes. (2018-09-13)

Water discovered in the Great Red Spot indicates Jupiter might have plenty more
A collaborative team found evidence of three cloud layers in the Great Red Spot, with the deepest cloud layer at 5-7 bars. A bar is a metric unit of pressure that approximates the average atmospheric pressure on Earth at sea level. At about 5-7 bars is where the scientists believed the temperature would reach the freezing point for water. The deepest of the three cloud layers identified by the team was believed to be composed of frozen water. (2018-08-30)

How gene hunting changed the culture of science
A University of Houston researcher reports that 15 years after the end of the Human Genome Project, which mapped the human genetic blueprint, the project is still making news because it forever changed the way scientists work. Among the findings, the literature published by teams of scientists fared better than those published by single authors. (2018-08-15)

Million fold increase in the power of waves near Jupiter's moon Ganymede
Chorus waves are electromagnetic waves. Converted to sound they sound like singing and chirping birds at dawn. They can cause polar lights above the Earth as well as damage to satellites. Now, a team of researchers led by Yuri Shprits of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences found that such waves are intensified millionfold around Jupiter's moon Ganymede. This study provides important observational constraints for theoretical studies. (2018-08-07)

Study co-authored by UCLA scientists shows evidence of water vapor plumes on Jupiter moon
A combination of new modeling techniques and data from the Galileo spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter's icy moon Europa back in 1997 have revealed additional evidence of eruptions of water vapor, or plumes, venting from the moon. (2018-05-17)

Old data, new tricks: Fresh results from NASA's Galileo spacecraft 20 years on
Newly analyzed data from the Galileo spacecraft's flybys of one of Jupiter's moons two decades ago is yielding fresh insights: the magnetic field around the moon Ganymede makes it unlike any other in the solar system. (2018-04-30)

Unveiling the depths of Jupiter's winds
Are the colorful bands just a pretty surface phenomenon, or are they a significant stratum of the planet? The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Yohai Kaspi led this research in which measurements from NASA's Juno spacecraft were analyzed to reveal that the stripes -- belts of strong winds circling the planet - extend to a depth of about 3,000 km. (2018-03-08)

Catching up to brain cancer
University of Delaware researchers have produced a new and freely available computer program that predicts cancer cell motion and spread with high accuracy. This new system gives researchers a faster way of examining rapidly spreading glioblastoma tumors -- an aggressive and devastating form of brain cancer -- and a new way of predicting the likely impact different treatments might have. (2018-02-15)

It's not how you play the game, but how the dice were made
Over time, dice used in playing games have changed in shape and size and evolved with considerations about fairness, chance and probability. (2018-01-30)

New study highlights 'hidden figure' of sun-watchers
Few people have heard of Hisako Koyama, but the dedicated female solar observer, born in Tokyo in 1916, created one of the most important sunspot records of the past 400 years, according to new research. (2017-10-02)

Equatorial jet in Venusian atmosphere discovered by Akatsuki
Observations by Japan's Venus climate orbiter Akatsuki have revealed an equatorial jet in the lower to middle cloud layer of the planet's atmosphere, a finding that could be pivotal to unraveling a phenomenon called superrotation. (2017-09-01)

NASA's Webb Telescope will study our solar system's 'ocean worlds'
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will use its infrared capabilities to study the (2017-08-24)

Can satellites be used as an early warning system for landslides?
Researchers from Newcastle University (UK), Chengdu University of Technology, Tongji University, China Academy of Space Technology and Wuhan University (China) have been tracking the massive landslide which struck Xinmo Village, Maoxian County, Sichuan Province in China. (2017-07-04)

UQ physicist builds on Einstein and Galileo's work
Sixteenth century scientist Galileo Galilei threw two spheres of different mass from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to establish a scientific principle. Now nearly four centuries later, a team of Italian physicists has applied the same principle to quantum objects using a novel scientific method proposed by UQ physicist Dr. Magdalena Zych, reported today in Nature Communications. (2017-06-02)

Venetian physician had a key role in shaping early modern chemistry
Newly discovered notes show for the first time the Venetian doctor who invented the thermometer and helped lay the foundations for modern medical treatment also played a key role in shaping our understanding of chemistry. (2017-05-26)

NASA's EPIC view spots flashes on Earth
One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off our planet. (2017-05-15)

Chip-based nanoscopy: Microscopy in HD quality
Physicists at Bielefeld University and the Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø have developed a photonic chip that makes it possible to carry out super-resolution light microscopy, also called 'nanoscopy,' with conventional microscopes. In nanoscopy, the position of single fluorescent molecules can be determined with a precision of just a few nano-meters, that is, to a millionth of a millimeter. (2017-04-24)

A rocky super-earth has been found in the habitable zone of a cool star close to the sun
In September 2014 MEarth detected a possible transit in the star named LHS 1140. Using data from MEarth-South and the HARPS spectrograph, a planet was confirmed orbiting around this star with a period of 25 days. (2017-04-24)

New research on northern lights will improve satellite navigation accuracy
Researchers at the University of Bath have gained new insights into the mechanisms of the northern lights, providing an opportunity to develop better satellite technology that can negate outages caused by this natural phenomenon. (2017-03-13)

Falsifying Galileo satellite signals will become more difficult
The European Union activated its Galileo satellite navigation system in December 2016. The EU is dedicated to setting this system apart from other navigation systems such as GPS - the US counterpart of Galileo. Researchers from the Department of Electrical Engineering at KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) have now risen to this challenge as well: they designed authentication features that will make it even more difficult to send out false Galileo signals. (2017-02-10)

New project to boost sat-nav positioning accuracy anywhere in world
A project exploiting global navigation satellite systems to establish the blueprint for the world's most accurate real-time positioning service is to run at the University of Nottingham. The service, to be developed at prototype level, will benefit safety-critical industries like aviation and maritime navigation, as well as high accuracy dependent applications such as offshore drilling and production operations, dredging, construction, agriculture and driverless cars and drones, just to name a few. (2017-01-24)

Scientists from the IAC discover a nearby 'superearth'
Researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias have discovered a 'superearth' type planet, GJ 536 b, whose mass is around 5.4 Earth masses, in orbit around a nearby very bright star. (2016-11-16)

Decades of discovery: NASA's exploration of Jupiter
Launched five years ago on Aug. 5, 2011, NASA's Juno mission maneuvered into orbit around Jupiter on July 4, 2016, joining a long tradition of discovery at the gas giant. (2016-08-05)

Swirling ammonia lies below Jupiter's thick clouds
Using radio waves, astronomers have been able to peer through Jupiter's thick clouds, gaining insights into the gas giant's atmosphere, a new study reports. (2016-06-02)

New radio map of Jupiter reveals what's beneath colorful clouds
Using the upgraded Very Large Array, UC Berkeley astronomers have produced a detailed radio map of the upper 100 kilometers of Jupiter's atmosphere, revealing the complex movement of ammonia gas that shapes the colorful clouds observed in the optical. The map will help understand how global circulation and cloud formation are driven by Jupiter's powerful internal heat source, and shed light on similar processes on giant planets in our solar system and around distant stars. (2016-06-02)

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