Current Game News and Events

Current Game News and Events, Game News Articles.
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How the brain learns that earmuffs are not valuable at the beach
A collaboration between the University of Tsukuba and the NEI in the US has discovered that fast-spiking neurons in the basal ganglia allow monkeys to associate different values with the same objects based on the surrounding environment. Blocking input from these cells inhibited learning of new scene-based values, but did not erase already learned associations. This could help understand clinical conditions such as Tourette syndrome, which is characterized by reduced input from these cells. (2021-01-21)

Tetris is no longer just a game, but an algorithm, which ensures maximum room occupancy
The software was developed by the University of Trento. It is a new and revolutionary method to manage the accommodation of guests in hotel. RoomTetris finds the best solution, the ideal combination between demand and supply, optimizing room occupancy. A tile-matching game that no human mind, no matter how experienced and skilled, could do better, with the seriousness and scientific rigor of a mathematical demonstration (2021-01-14)

Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves
Extinct dire wolves split off from other wolves nearly six million years ago and were only a distant relative of today's wolves, according to new research published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Aggressive video games: Effects on mental health and behaviors in young people
Aggressive video games are not a risk factor for mental health problems, according to a new study of more than 3,000 youth (2021-01-13)

Levels of stress hormone in saliva of newborn deer fawns may predict mortality
The first-ever study of the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the saliva of newborn white-tailed deer fawns yielded thought-provoking results that have Penn State researchers suggesting predation is not the only thing in the wild killing fawns. (2021-01-11)

What happens when your brain can't tell which way is up or down?
What feels like up may actually be some other direction depending on how our brains process our orientation, according to psychology researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. In a new study published in PLoS One, researchers at York University's Centre for Vision Research found that an individual's interpretation of the direction of gravity can be altered by how their brain responds to visual information. (2021-01-07)

Cancer's intelligence
Dr. J. James Frost and The International Journal of Unconventional Computing will soon be publishing 'Cancer's Intelligence' which reports that Cancer can be analyzed as an intelligent system of collaborating and computing cells. (2020-12-22)

Research uses a video game to identify attention deficit symptoms
Adapting a traditional endless runner video game and using a raccoon as the protagonist, researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM, in its Spanish acronym), among other institutions, have developed a platform that allows the identification and evaluation of the degree of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. (2020-12-21)

Popular European football games linked to traffic accidents in Asia
Days when high profile European football matches are played are associated with more traffic accidents in Asia than days when less popular matches are played, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Losing money causes plastic changes in the brain
Researchers at the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have shown experimentally that economic activity can actively change the brain. Signals that predict regular financial losses evoke plastic changes in the cortex. Therefore, these signals are processed by the brain more meticulously, which helps to identify such situations more accurately. The article was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-15)

NBA 'bubble' reveals the ultimate home court advantage, study finds
Using the NBA's travel-less bubble as a natural experiment, a new statistical analysis suggests performance on the road depends on aligning the internal body clock with the new time zone and quality of sleep. (2020-12-11)

A better kind of cybersecurity strategy
The multilateral nature of cybersecurity today makes it markedly different than conventional security, according to a study co-authored by Alexander Wolitzky of MIT. The researchers' new model shows why countries that retaliate too much against online attacks can make things worse for themselves. (2020-12-09)

Using a video game to understand the origin of emotions
A number of studies have sought to connect given emotions, such as fear or pleasure, to specific areas of the brain, but without success. A research team from the University of Geneva analyzed volunteers while they were playing a video game that had been specially developed to arouse different emotions. The results, show that different emotional components recruit several neural networks in parallel distributed throughout the brain, and that their transient synchronization generates an emotional state. (2020-12-04)

RUDN University mathematician suggested new approach to cooperative game
A mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions. This approach is vivid and easy to check, and it makes the calculations easier. Among other things, the new development can be applied to cooperative game theory. (2020-12-01)

Is it better to give than receive?
Young children who have experienced compassionate love and empathy from their mothers may be more willing to turn thoughts into action by being generous to others, a University of California, Davis, study suggests. Lab studies were done of children at ages 4 and 6. (2020-11-30)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

Basketball on the brain: Neuroscientists use sports to study surprise
Princeton neuroscientists tracked the brains and pupils of self-described basketball fans as they watched March Madness games, to study how people process surprise -- an unexpected change of circumstances that shifts an anticipated outcome. They found that that shifts in the pattern of activity in high-level brain areas only happened at moments that contradicted the watchers' current beliefs about which team was more likely to win. (2020-11-25)

Computer scientists launch counteroffensive against video game cheaters
University of Texas at Dallas computer scientists have devised a new weapon against video game players who cheat. The researchers developed their approach for detecting cheaters using the popular first-person shooter game Counter-Strike. But the mechanism can work for any massively multiplayer online (MMO) game that sends data traffic to a central server. Their research was published online Aug. 3 in IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing. (2020-11-16)

New maps document big-game migrations across the western United States
For the first time, state and federal wildlife biologists have come together to map the migrations of ungulates across America's West. The maps will help land managers and conservationists pinpoint actions necessary to keep migration routes open and functional to sustain healthy big-game populations. (2020-11-12)

Soccer players' head injury risk could be reduced with simple adjustments to the ball
To reduce risk of soccer player head injury, a new study recommends preventing how hard a ball hits the head by inflating balls to lower pressures and subbing them out when they get wet. (2020-11-12)

Irish and UK research helps to unravel secrets behind Game of Thrones
A researcher at University of Limerick, Ireland has played a key role in examining some of the secrets behind Game of Thrones. (2020-11-09)

Game 'pre-bunks' political misinformation by letting players undermine democracy
An online game helps ''inoculate'' players against fake news by showing them how political misinformation is created and circulated. Launched today, Harmony Square has been created by Cambridge University psychologists with support from US Department of Homeland Security. Accompanying study shows that a single play reduces the perceived reliability of misinformation in users. (2020-11-06)

New study shows that football fixture pile-ups are forcing layers and coaches to change
Footballers may be fitter than ever before but congested fixture lists are forcing players to pace themselves while team managers are forced to increasingly juggle their resources, according to new research on elite level men's football by a University of Huddersfield academic. (2020-11-05)

A new mathematical front to understand species coexistence
In an effort to understand how different species coexist, researchers develop a mathematical model that establishes interactions in co-colonization as the key. The study, published in the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, links epidemiology, ecology and evolution and models host colonization by different microbial species, providing fundamental advances for the analysis of species coexistence and the understanding of biodiversity. (2020-11-03)

Monkey see others, monkey do: How the brain allows actions based on social cues
Researchers at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan have shown that when monkeys make decisions based on social cues provided by other monkeys, information flow from one part of the brain (the ventral premotor cortex) to another (medial prefrontal cortex) is vital. When this neuronal pathway is silenced temporarily, monkeys cannot catch the social cues and end up behaving like autistic monkeys. (2020-11-02)

Secrets behind "Game of Thrones" unveiled by data science and network theory
What are the secrets behind one of the most successful fantasy series of all time? How has a story as complex as ''Game of Thrones'' enthralled the world and how does it compare to other narratives? Researchers from five universities across the UK and Ireland came together to unravel ''A Song of Ice and Fire'', the books on which the TV series is based. (2020-11-02)

Player behavior in the online game EVE Online may reflect real world country
Virtual worlds may reflect social and economic behavior in the real world, according to a study published October 21, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andres M. Belaza and colleagues from Ghent University, Belgium. (2020-10-21)

The gravity of play: Quantifying what we enjoy about games
Scientists from the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have created a mathematical model combining aspects from psychology and the physics of motion to objectively analyze the appeal of games and its evolution throughout history. Their findings show that changes in certain game-related measures are in line with cultural trends from various eras, demonstrating that their model is a promising approach to understanding human enjoyment derived from games. (2020-10-20)

Game 'pre-bunks' COVID-19 conspiracies as part of UK's fight against fake news
Cambridge research shows a 'pre-bunk' game can reduce susceptibility to fake news for up to three months after just one play. Latest findings come as new Go Viral! game is launched in partnership with the UK Government to fight the spread of COVID-19 false information. * The games let users play the role of a fake news producer so they can understand how misinformation is circulated online. (2020-10-09)

Candidates who lie more likely to win elections - new study
A new economics experiment suggests the electoral system attracts candidates who are dishonest and highlights why greater transparency might foster more trust in politics. (2020-10-08)

New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 - New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's ''ground game,'' targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base. (2020-10-07)

Researchers exploit weaknesses of master game bots
Researchers at Penn State designed an algorithm to train an adversarial bot, which was able to automatically discover and exploit weaknesses of master game bots driven by reinforcement learning algorithms. (2020-09-30)

Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322 volunteers in an online experiment which took place over two sessions. (2020-09-29)

Overpriced? TUD researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber
How exactly does the strategy of the artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber work and when is it used? This is what Dr. Malte Schröder and Professor Marc Timme from the Chair for Network Dynamics at the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) and the Institute for Theoretical Physics at TU Dresden have been investigating alongside PhD students David-Maximilian Storch and Philip Marszal. The two researchers published a study in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-24)

Playing video games as a child can improve working memory years later
UOC research reveals cognitive changes can be found even years after people stop playing (2020-09-22)

Study examines how civil wars affect wildlife populations
A new study comprehensively reveals how civil wars impact wildlife in countries affected by conflict. Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA), in the UK, Federal University of Paraíba (UFPB), Brazil, and University of Agostinho Neto (UAN), Angola, found that the main impacts of civil wars on native mammals are often indirect, ultimately arising from institutional and socio-economic changes, rather than from direct military tactics. (2020-09-14)

Systematic approach crucial for person-centred care
Systematic efforts and a clear structure are decisive factors in the transition to person-centred health care. A University of Gothenburg study, published in the scientific journal BMJ, reflects what is now a decade of experience and research in the field. (2020-09-10)

Betrayal or cooperation? Analytical investigation of behavior drivers
At the macroscopic level, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form groupings. Yet at the basic two-person level, people tend to betray each other, as found in games like the prisoner's dilemma, even though people would receive a better payoff if they cooperated among themselves. The topic of cooperation and how and when people start trusting one another has been studied numerically, and in the journal Chaos, researchers investigate what drives cooperation analytically. (2020-09-08)

Battery-free Game Boy runs forever
Researchers develop first-ever battery-free, energy-harvesting, interactive device. And it looks and feels like a retro 8-bit Nintendo Game Boy. (2020-09-03)

Tel Aviv University study sheds light on brain mechanism activated by uncertainty
A new Tel Aviv University study examined the brain's reactions in conditions of uncertainty and stressful conflict in an environment of risks and opportunities. The researchers identified the areas of the brain responsible for the delicate balance between desiring gain and avoiding loss along the way. (2020-09-01)

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