Current Gardening News and Events

Current Gardening News and Events, Gardening News Articles.
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Communal activities boost rehabilitation for older adults in long term care
A group of researchers has developed a new program showing participation and activity is critical for the rehabilitation of older adults in long-term care. (2021-02-19)

Robotic dogs & laughter therapy: combating loneliness & isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2021-02-17)

School gardens linked with kids eating more vegetables
Getting children to eat their vegetables can seem like an insurmountable task, but nutrition researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found one way: school gardens and lessons on using what's grown in them. Researchers worked with 16 elementary schools across Central Texas to install vegetable gardens and teach classes to students and parents about nutrition and cooking and published the results study in the International Journal for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. (2021-02-04)

In pandemic, people are turning to nature - especially women
One of the first studies on our relationship with nature during COVID finds significant increases in outdoor activity, especially among women. Women were 1.7 (gardening) to 2.9 (walking) times more likely to report increasing their activity compared to men. In general, outdoor activities seeing the largest increases were: watching wildlife, gardening, photos or art in nature, relaxing alone outside, and walking. (2020-12-16)

Household-grown food leads to improved health for children
Children grow taller in rural households where their mothers are supported to grow their own food - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The research, which looked at households in low- and middle-income countries, showed growing their own food helped mothers to prevent stunting, wasting and underweight in their children. Their children's food was more varied, meaning they had access to different classes of food nutrients. (2020-12-03)

New study uses satellites and field studies to improve coral reef restoration
A recent study published in Restoration Ecology by researchers from Arizona State University's Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) found evidence that particulate organic carbon levels are one of the most important factors in determining coral outplant survival. (2020-11-09)

Study raises questions about role of leisure activity in dementia
Studies have suggested that taking part in leisure activities such as playing cards or gardening may be associated with a lower risk of developing dementia. But a new study found no association between taking part in leisure activities at age 56 and the risk of dementia over the next 18 years. The study is published in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

How consumers responded to COVID-19
The coronavirus pandemic has been a catalyst for laying out the different threats that consumers face, and that consumers must prepare themselves for a constantly shifting landscape moving forward. A new study sets a framework for researchers to explore these topics and identify the needs of consumers during disruptive times. (2020-10-12)

Maternal insecticide use during pregnancy and neonatal jaundice
Association between pesticide usage during pregnancy and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring treatment: The Japan Environment and Children's study. (2020-08-28)

Dementia education
School-based dementia education could deliver much needed empathy and understanding for older generations as new research from the University of South Australia shows it can significantly improve dementia knowledge and awareness among younger generations. (2020-08-20)

Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years
Archaeologists at The Australian National University have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. The evidence of cultivation and plant management dates back 2,145 years and was found at Wagadagam on the tiny island of Mabuyag in the western Torres Strait. The research is led by a First Australian author. His work makes a statement that goes beyond academia. (2020-08-11)

Food menu fit for pandemic times
In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, eating well in a sustainable way is more important now than ever, Flinders University experts say. 'Eating local' and growing your own fruit and vegetables can save money, provide families and local producers with vital income - and also improve health and immunity. (2020-08-03)

Keep moving to prevent major mobility disability
According to research, being physically inactive is the strongest risk factor for disability as we age. A team of researchers created a study to examine the effects of performing light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on older adults. The researchers were interested in studying how participating in these different intensities of activity, and whether a person spreads their physical activity throughout the day, affects the chances for developing a major mobility disability. (2020-06-11)

New Papua New Guinea research solves archaeological mysteries
New research which 'fills in the blanks' on what ancient Papuan New Guineans ate, and how they processed food, has ended decades-long speculation on tool use and food stables in the highlands of New Guinea several thousand years ago. (2020-06-03)

Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making cities more sustainable and livable. (2020-05-11)

Spending time in the garden linked to better health and wellbeing
Spending time in the garden is linked to similar benefits for health and wellbeing as living in wealthy areas, according to a new large-scale study. (2020-05-05)

Physically active older veterans fall more, but hurt themselves less
Active older veterans fall more often than their more sedentary peers who never served in the armed forces, but they're less likely to injure themselves when they do, says a University of Michigan researcher. (2020-04-14)

For stroke survivors, light physical activity linked to better daily function
Stroke survivors who engage in a lot of light physical activity -- taking leisurely walks or attending to nonstrenuous household chores, for example -- also report fewer physical limitations than their more sedentary peers, a new study finds. (2020-04-02)

Gardening helps to grow positive body image
New research has found that allotment gardening promotes positive body image, which measures someone's appreciation of their own body and its functions, and an acceptance of bodily imperfections. (2020-04-02)

Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say. (2019-12-06)

Solving fossil mystery could aid quest for ancient life on Mars
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. (2019-11-27)

What will make grandma use her Fitbit longer?
For older adults, Fitbits and other activity trackers may be popular gifts, but they may not be used for very long. While counterintuitive, engaging in competition with family and friends decreases the odds of long-term use among older adults, perhaps because they feel it's demotivating, according to a new Michigan State University study. (2019-11-18)

Is physical activity always good for the heart?
Physical activity is thought to be our greatest ally in the fight against cardiovascular disease. But there may be significant variations in its protective effects across a range of different situations. (2019-11-04)

Urban, home gardens could help curb food insecurity, health problems
Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study from the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, indicates urban and home gardens -- combined with nutrition education -- could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage. (2019-10-07)

It's never too late to start exercising, new study shows
Older people who have never taken part in sustained exercise programs have the same ability to build muscle mass as highly trained master athletes of a similar age, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2019-08-30)

Researchers find triple as many Legionnaire's cases as previously reported
The first New Zealand-wide study of the burden of Legionnaire's disease has found triple the number of cases of this form of pneumonia than previously reported. (2019-06-10)

Even low levels of leisure time physical activity lowers risk of death
Even low-level physical activities, such as walking or gardening, are associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer or any cause finds a large observational study published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2019-03-19)

Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia
Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a study published in the February 20, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Mental activities included reading, playing instruments, singing in a choir, visiting concerts, gardening, doing needlework or attending religious services. (2019-02-20)

Body size may influence women's lifespan more than it does men's
Body size-height and weight- may influence women's lifespan far more than it does men's, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2019-01-21)

Deadly behavior-modifying weapon identified in insect-world chemical arms race
New research from the University of East Anglia joins the dots between zombie ants, an insect-world arms race and the search for new antibiotics. Scientists probing one of the mysteries of the insect world identified a powerful chemical weapon used in the arms race between fungus-farming leafcutter ants and the parasites that plague them. It is hoped that the findings will help scientists search for new antibiotics from this unique battlefield. (2018-06-07)

Study highlights need for strength training in older women to ward off effects of aging
Study looked at 46 women across two different age ranges, 60-74 and 75-90, to learn how physical activity affects frailty differently in the two groups. (2018-04-23)

The connection between diet, obesity, and cancer: Nutrition experts explore the evidence
About one third of cancer cases are estimated to be linked to dietary and other modifiable risk factors, especially for obesity-related cancers such as breast, colorectal, ovarian, endometrial, kidney, gallbladder, esophageal, and pancreatic cancers. In this special theme issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, food and nutrition practitioners and other health professionals take an in-depth look at the relationship between nutrition, obesity, and cancer prevention, treatment, and survival and identify research gaps for future prevention research efforts. (2018-03-27)

Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the disease
Many wives of advanced prostate cancer sufferers feel that their lives are being undermined by their husband's illness, with nearly half reporting that their own health suffered. In addition a focus subgroup has revealed that many feel isolated and fearful, and worry about the role change in their lives as their husband's cancer advances. This study, is amongst the first carried out on how prostate cancer affects the partners of sufferers. It was presented yesterday at the EAU conference in Copenhagen. (2018-03-19)

Stem cells treat macular degeneration
UCSB researchers helped develop a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss. (2018-03-19)

Just a few minutes of light intensity exercise linked to lower death risk in older men
Clocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2018-02-19)

Cutting edge technology reveals how to dig
Musculoskeletal modeling applied to horticultural workers engaged in digging to predict risk of injury. (2018-01-22)

New research reveals how gardeners can dig for health, not injury
New research from Coventry University and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) reveals that a bad digging technique can as much as double the load on the joints in the body, leaving people susceptible to chronic injuries. (2018-01-08)

Any physical activity in elderly better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk
Any physical activity in the elderly is better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk, according to an 18-year study in more than 24,000 adults published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (2017-11-22)

Space greens beat the blues
Plants in space are important to grow food, but they may also play a key role in maintaining the psychological well-being of space crews. The next frontier of space plant experimentation is to examine the psychological impact of plant life on astronauts. (2017-10-19)

MSU Geographer studied changes of weather in Moscow over the last century and a quarter
A researcher from Lomonosov Moscow State University's Faculty of Geography Mikhail Lokoshchenko has discovered the complex nature of changes in temperature and relative humidity in Moscow over the period of many years, from the end of the 19th century to the present day. The results were published in Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. (2017-10-17)

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