Current Gastroenterology News and Events

Current Gastroenterology News and Events, Gastroenterology News Articles.
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Study identifies 'Achilles heel' of bacteria linked to Crohn's disease
The discovery of an ''Achilles heel'' in a type of gut bacteria that causes intestinal inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease may lead to more targeted therapies for the difficult to treat disease, according to Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators. (2021-02-05)

Delaying colonoscopy following abnormal stool test increases risk of colorectal cancer
A new VA study finds that delays in undergoing colonoscopy following an abnormal stool test increase the risk of a colorectal cancer diagnosis and cancer-related death. The findings showed the risk of colorectal cancer-related death increased by up to 1.5 times when colonoscopy was delayed more than 19 months. (2021-02-02)

Year delay between abnormal, at-home screening and colonoscopy increases cancer risk
A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found delayed time between abnormal stool-based screening and subsequent colonoscopy was associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis and death from colorectal cancer. (2021-02-02)

Study finds potential therapeutic targets to inhibit colorectal cancer progression
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues have revealed that colorectal cancer tissues contain at least two types of fibroblasts, namely, cancer-promoting fibroblasts and cancer-restraining fibroblasts, and that the balance between them is largely involved in the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings suggest that artificially altering the balance between the two types of cells could curb the spread of colorectal cancer tumors, which may become an effective strategy for preventing cancer progression. (2021-01-30)

Gut microbiota reveals whether drug therapies work in inflammatory bowel diseases
A study recently completed at the University of Helsinki indicates that the gut microbiota of patients suffering from inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders can be used to predict whether they will benefit from expensive therapies. The study also confirms the key role of therapies that have a beneficial effect on the gut microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases. (2021-01-26)

For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that patients with Barrett's esophagus may be vulnerable to coronavirus infection from what they swallow. (2021-01-20)

Liver cancer cells manipulate stromal cells involved in fibrosis to promote tumor growth
Researchers led by Osaka University have found that liver cancer cells induce autophagy in hepatic stellate cells, causing them to produce a growth factor called GDF15 that promotes tumor growth. GDF15 was more highly expressed in tumor tissue than normal liver tissue, and patients with higher levels of GDF15 had a poorer prognosis. New therapies targeting GDF15 may help prevent the development and proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. (2021-01-06)

Beta-blockers display anti-inflammatory effects in advanced liver disease
Beta-blockers are used to prevent internal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Researchers from MedUni Vienna have now shown that Beta-blockers also have beneficial effects on systemic inflammation and this translates into improved clinical outcomes. (2020-12-10)

New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

Liver cirrhosis: Disease progression
Patients with liver cirrhosis display a wide range of clinical symptoms. A prospective study conducted by MedUni Vienna has now shown that blood levels of biomarkers for systemic inflammation increase over the various stages of the disease and can predict the development of complications, even in previously asymptomatic patients. (2020-11-30)

Specific bacterium in the gut linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have detected a connection between Brachyspira, a genus of bacteria in the intestines, and IBS -- especially the form that causes diarrhea. Although the discovery needs confirmation in larger studies, there is hope that it might lead to new remedies for many people with irritable bowel syndrome. (2020-11-25)

Respirator 2.0: new n95-alternative introduces sensors for a better fit
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been working to design a better, reusable respirator that could serve as an alternative to an N95 respirator. In the latest iteration of their work, they have introduced sensors to inform the user if the respirator is on properly and whether the filters are becoming saturated. (2020-11-10)

Immunotherapy may work better in stomach cancer when combined with chemo, given earlier
Immunotherapy, often ineffective against stomach cancer, was more effective when combined with chemotherapy and given earlier, finds a new study in mice. (2020-11-05)

Experts release new management strategies for malignant colorectal polyps
Early identification and removal of cancerous colorectal polyps is critical to preventing the progression of colorectal cancer and improving survival rates. The U.S. Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer has released new guidance for endoscopists on how to assess colorectal lesions for features associated with cancer, discuss how these factors guide management, and outline when to advise surgery after malignant polyp removal. (2020-11-04)

CHOP genomic study reveals role for hypothalamus in inflammatory bowel disease
Using sophisticated 3D genomic mapping and integrating with public data resulting from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found significant genetic correlations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and stress and depression. (2020-10-29)

UArizona Health Sciences researchers find biomarker that can appear before stomach cancer
A microRNA that can be found in a blood sample may make it easier to detect gastric cancer and could lead to improved treatment for the disease and others like it that are resistant to common immunotherapies. (2020-10-20)

Researchers seek to end unexpected bills for screening colonoscopies
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received ''surprise'' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. (2020-10-15)

Study identifies gene variants to help personalize treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis
A group of three gene variants, commonly inherited together, may provide clues to more successful treatment of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammation of the food pipe often confused with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A new study, led by researchers from Nemours Children's Health System and published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, identifies genetic variants that help predict which children with EoE may not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication therapy as a long-term solution. (2020-10-15)

"Game-changing" procedure shown to discontinue insulin treatment in type 2 diabetics
The study found that 75% of previously insulin-dependent people with type 2 diabetes treated with the ablation technique did not need insulin six months later, with HbA1c readings of 7.5% or below. Patients who responded to the treatment also saw significant reductions in their body mass index (BMI). (2020-10-12)

Asthma and food allergies during childhood associated with increased risk of IBS
Those with IBS at 16 were almost twice as likely to have had asthma at the age of 12 (11.2% vs 6.7%). Almost half of children with IBS at 16 (40.7%) reported food hypersensitivity at 12 years (compared to 29.2% of children without IBS at 16). (2020-10-11)

COVID-related delays to CRC screening causing 11.9% rise in death rates, research reveals
New research has shown that delays in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening caused by COVID-19 has resulted in significantly increased death rates for the cancer. Researchers at the University of Bologna produced a model to forecast the impact of time delays in CRC screening on CRC mortality caused by COVID-19. The results found that moderate (7-12 months) and large (>12 months) delays in screening caused a 3% and 7% increase in advanced stage CRC respectively. (2020-10-11)

Weight loss surgery in obese diabetic patients significantly cuts pancreatic cancer risk
The study, presented today at UEG Week 2020 Virtual, analysed 1,435,350 patients with concurrent diabetes and obesity over a 20-year period. A total of 10,620 patients within the study had undergone bariatric surgery, an operation that helps patients lose weight by making changes to the digestive system. (2020-10-11)

AGA releases largest report on safety and effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation
Today, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) released the first results from the NIH-funded AGA Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) National Registry, the largest real-world study on the safety and effectiveness of FMT. Published in Gastroenterology, the registry reported that FMT led to a cure of Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) infection in 90% of patients across 20 North American FMT practice sites. Few serious side effects were reported. (2020-10-01)

The "gold" in breast milk
Breast milk strengthens a child's immune system, supporting the intestinal flora. These facts are common knowledge. But how does this work? What are the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon? And why is this not possible the same way with bottle feeding? The reasons were unknown until a team from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence at Hannover Medical School (MHH) recently discovered how alarmins are that mechanism in a project involving the University of Bonn. (2020-08-28)

Global gut health experts guide growth of synbiotics
Chances are you've heard of probiotics: supplements delivering 'good microbes' to the gut, providing a wide range of health benefits. You may also be aware of prebiotics: supplements designed to fuel the good microbes already living in our guts. The next wave of gut-health supplements, known as synbiotics, essentially combine pre- and probiotics. To keep research and development on the right track, an expert panel recently redefined the term and developed guidelines on scientific investigation. (2020-08-24)

Antibiotics associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
Antibiotics use, particularly antibiotics with greater spectrum of microbial coverage, may be associated with an increased risk of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its subtypes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Harvard Medical School in the United States, published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology. The association between antimicrobial treatment and IBD remained when patients were compared with their siblings. (2020-08-17)

Study gauges specific site stomach cancer risks among ethnic groups
Non-white Americans, especially Asian Americans, are at disproportionately higher risk for gastric cancer compared to non-Hispanic white Americans. A new study breaks down this risk according to specific ethnicities and locations within the stomach. (2020-08-06)

A new device provides added protection against COVID-19 during endoscopic procedures
The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown up unimaginable challenges for healthcare workers. Even simple outpatient procedures such as endoscopies can expose staff to the risk of infection. However, a team of researchers has developed a simple, disposable, and inexpensive device to provide an additional barrier of protection for healthcare workers performing esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD). (2020-07-22)

Multidisciplinary approach more effective for gut disorders: study
Researchers from the University of Melbourne and St Vincent's Hospital in Australia have conducted a trial involving 144 patients to compare the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary clinic - involving gastroenterologists, dieticians, psychiatrists and physiotherapists - with usual gastroenterology specialist-only care. (2020-07-15)

Machine learning accurately predicts who's who in the health care workforce
Until recently, economists, policy makers and workforce experts have relied on outdated and inaccurate snapshots of the US physician workforce, making it especially difficult to predict the need and availability of health care services across the country. In this study, Wingrove et al examine how machine learning algorithms may allow for more real-time, accurate descriptions of the medical workforce. (2020-07-14)

Sobering reminder about liver disease
Alcohol's popularity and its central place in socialising in Australia obscures the dangers of excessive drinking and possible liver disease, Flinders University experts warn. As Dry July awareness month highlights the various health risks, the Head of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation at Flinders Medical Centre Associate Professor Alan Wigg says alcohol misuse remains a major health challenge in Australia as seen by high in rates of life-threatening liver disease. (2020-07-10)

Superbug impact on the gut
Monash University researchers have discovered that the devastating bacterial superbug Clostridioides difficile hijacks the human wound healing system in order to cause serious and persistent disease, opening up the development of new therapies to treat the disease. (2020-06-25)

Could the cure for IBD be inside your mouth?
A new collaborative study from the U-M Medical and Dental Schools reveals that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health via a clash between the mouth and gut microbiomes. (2020-06-16)

Strength training benefits patients with cirrhosis
Three hours of weekly strength training combined with protein supplements leads to both bigger and stronger muscles in patients with cirrhosis. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital. (2020-06-11)

Four of ten adults worldwide have functional gastrointestinal disorders
For every ten adults in the world, four suffer from functional gastrointestinal disorders of varying severity. This is shown by a study of more than 73,000 people in 33 countries. University of Gothenburg scientists are among those now presenting these results. (2020-05-27)

Navigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), has released a special issue providing clinicians and researchers an up-to-date resource on the risk factors, natural history, diagnosis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). (2020-05-19)

New study sheds light on IBD patients with COVID
The researchers conclude that increasing age, comorbidities, and corticosteroids are associated with severe COVID-19 among IBD patients. Notably, TNF antagonists do not appear to be associated with severe COVID-19. (2020-05-18)

Management of inflammatory bowel diseases: Clinical perspectives
In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), leading international experts provide a comprehensive update on the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) for the practicing clinician (2020-05-06)

New COVID-19 guidance for gastroenterologists
AGA has published new expert recommendations in Gastroenterology: AGA Institute Rapid Review of the GI and Liver Manifestations of COVID-19, Meta-Analysis of International Data, and Recommendations for the Consultative Management of Patients with COVID-19. (2020-05-04)

Study finds highly elevated levels of fatty liver disease for 9/11 first responders
Toxin exposure appears to have contributed to dramatically higher rates of fatty liver disease among first responders to the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020. DDW® data will be published in the May online supplements to Gastroenterology and GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2020-04-30)

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