Current Gastroenterology News and Events | Page 3

Current Gastroenterology News and Events, Gastroenterology News Articles.
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Researchers warn: junk food could be responsible for the food allergy epidemic
Experts at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition are today presenting the results of a study that show higher levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), found in abundance in junk food, are associated with food allergy in children. (2019-06-07)

New blood test on horizon for the 1 in 10 children who suffer common liver disease
A new blood test could become clinical practice within five years, reducing the need for a liver biopsy in the management of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), as a major new international pediatric liver registry collaboration yields early results. (2019-06-07)

Large placebo-controlled trial confirms safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)
For patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat gastroesophageal disease (GERD) or other acid-related conditions, new research puts safety concerns to rest. In a large, multi-year, randomized trial studying the safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), researchers find no evidence to support claims that PPIs cause serious health issues such as pneumonia, chronic kidney disease, diabetes and dementia. This research is published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, as an article in press. (2019-06-06)

Gall bladder removal may reduce stroke risk in patients with gallstones
Previous research indicates that gallstones are linked with an increased risk of stroke. A new Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology study found that gall bladder removal may help lower this risk. (2019-06-05)

Biomarker predicts which pancreatic cysts may become cancerous
A multicenter team led by investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has taken a big step toward identifying the cysts likely to become cancerous. Testing fluid from cysts for a biomarker -- an antibody called mAb Das-1 -- the researchers were able to identify pancreatic cysts likely to become cancerous with 95% accuracy. (2019-06-05)

Baylor Scott & White gastroenterology researchers share key takeaways from DDW 2019
Dr. Stuart J. Spechler among researchers from Baylor Scott & White Research Institute available to provide key takeaways from Digestive Disease Week 2019. (2019-05-20)

Button batteries can rapidly damage stomach lining before symptoms appear
Damage to the lining of the stomach can occur quickly when children swallow button batteries; therefore, clinicians should consider prompt endoscopic removal, even when the child is symptom free and the battery has passed safely through the narrow esophagus, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019. The recommendations represent a change from current practice of watching and waiting. (2019-05-18)

Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS
The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected. This is shown by a Sahlgrenska Academy study indicating that patients with IBS should get treatments for different abnormalities simultaneously, to improve both bowel function and signaling from the brain to the gut. (2019-05-15)

Minimally invasive procedure shows promise in combatting obesity
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG), a relatively new, minimally invasive weight-loss procedure, resulted in significant total body weight loss in the first long-term study to follow patients' progress over five years, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019. Researchers hope these results will help solve a serious 'treatment gap' for more than 100 million Americans with obesity who are unwilling or ineligible for traditional bariatric surgery. (2019-05-09)

Singapore scientists develop swallowable self-inflating capsule to help tackle obesity
A team of scientists from NTU Singapore and NUHS has developed a self-inflating weight management capsule that could help battle obesity, and be an alternative to intragastric balloons. The prototype capsule contains a balloon that can be self-inflated with a handheld magnet once it is in the stomach, thus inducing a sense of fullness. (2019-04-24)

Feces transplantation: Effective treatment with economic benefits
From an average of 37 days in hospital to just 20 days per year. So pronounced is the decrease in hospitalizations for patients who are treated with feces transplantation instead of antibiotics to fight the deadly intestinal disease Clostridium difficile. This is shown by the first study using what is known as 'real world data.' (2019-04-23)

Increase in foreign body ingestions among young children
A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for children younger than six years who were treated in a US emergency department due to concern of a foreign body ingestion from 1995 through 2015. (2019-04-12)

Hepatitis C infections could be prevented by reducing transmission in people who inject drugs
Stepping up efforts to prevent transmission of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs, could reduce future infections by 43% globally, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol published in the Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology today. (2019-04-09)

New approach for potential treatment of liver cancer patients with Hep B virus infection
A new treatment approach using engineered Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) specific T cells has, for the first time, shown promising results in the treatment of HBV related liver cancer in a landmark translational research study between Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore General Hospital and Lion TCR. (2019-03-27)

New evidence on the role of the gut microbiome in improving human health
The gut microbiome is one of the fastest moving areas of science today. Twenty-three new abstracts highlighting the most cutting-edge advances in gut microbiome research will be presented at the eighth annual Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, March 23-24, 2019, in Miami, Fla. (2019-03-23)

Role of interventional inflammatory bowel disease in the era of biologic therapy
According to a new statement from a panel of national and international experts in gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other areas, interventional (or therapeutic) IBD endoscopy has an expanding role in the treatment of disease and of adverse events from surgery. (2019-02-14)

Emerging therapies show benefit to patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no cures for these diseases. Studies being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress -- a partnership of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and the American Gastroenterological Association, in Las Vegas, Nev., from Feb. 7-9 - highlight advancements in treatments for patients with IBD. (2019-02-07)

Increased patient-provider communication affects outcomes of the IBD patient journey
It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Currently, there are no cures for these diseases. For many patients, their disease impacts other areas of their health and well-being, including aspects of their reproductive and mental health. Studies being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis highlights the need to treat the entire patient and reinforces the role of patient-provider communication. (2019-02-07)

Liver cancer patients can be treated for Hep C infection
A large, multi-center study refutes earlier suggestions that antiviral drugs for treating hepatitis C may lead to a higher recurrence of liver cancer. (2019-01-18)

New guideline recommendations for the treatment of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis
Most patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have mild-to-moderate disease characterized by periods of activity or remission, but practice variations exist in disease management. A new clinical guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of AGA, addresses the medical management of these patients, focusing on use of both oral and topical 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) medications, rectal corticosteroids and oral budesonide, to promote high-quality care for UC patients. (2019-01-10)

Gut microbiome in digestive health: a new frontier in research
Research on the gut microbiome is one of the most promising areas of science today. In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has taken the deep-dive into the gut microbiome that both scientists and the public are looking for to help them better understand the effects of the microbiome on health and disease. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology is the clinical practice journal of the AGA. (2019-01-04)

In Fimo, we trust: finally a name for the experimental examination of poop
Why, you might ask, do we need a scientifically accurate term based in Latin for the study of poop? The answer is quite simple: because so many scientific words are based in Latin and there hasn't been one for the experimental study of excrement, even though the scientific study of human waste is now at the forefront of biomedical research. (2019-01-03)

Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity
A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries. (2018-12-20)

Going viral: New cells for norovirus production in the lab
Human norovirus is a major cause of infections that can be particularly dangerous to children and elderly people. Here, an Osaka University-led research team found that human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal epithelial cells allowed for efficient growth of human norovirus in the laboratory, without requiring human tissue or bile. This method raises fewer practical and ethical issues than conventional systems and should prove useful for industrial applications such as testing new potential vaccines. (2018-12-10)

Some people uncomfortable discontinuing cancer screening even when benefit is low
A new study finds 29 percent of veterans who underwent recommended screening colonoscopies were uncomfortable with the idea of stopping these screenings when the benefit was expected to be low for them personally. (2018-12-07)

PPIs combined with oral anticoagulants reduce risk of gastrointestinal bleeding
A Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published today in JAMA shows that patients already at higher risk for gastrointestinal bleeding gain a marked protection from this risk when they take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in combination with an oral anticoagulant. (2018-12-04)

Racial differences in colorectal cancer incidence not due to biology
A systematic review and meta-analysis from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine has found that, in spite of the higher incidence and death rate of colorectal cancer in blacks, no difference exists in the overall prevalence of advanced, precancerous polyps between average-risk blacks and whites who underwent a screening colonoscopy. These findings suggest that the age at which to begin screening need not differ based on race, provided all other factors -- access to screening, in particular -- are similar. (2018-10-23)

Does gut microbiota hold the key to improved diagnosis and treatment of esophageal cancer?
Researchers from Italy directed by Professor Cammarota have found a unique pattern of microbes living in the esophagus of people with esophageal cancer or Barrett's esophagus, which could potentially be used to identify at-risk individuals and pave the way for new types of treatment in the future. (2018-10-22)

Cannabis improves symptoms of Crohn's disease despite having no effect on gut inflammation
In a randomized, placebo-controlled study, researchers from Israel have shown that cannabis can produce clinical remission in up to 65 percent of individuals after eight weeks of treatment, but that this improvement does not appear to result from a dampening down of the underlying inflammatory process. (2018-10-21)

Increased mortality in children with inflammatory bowel disease
Children who develop inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease) have an increased risk of death, both in childhood and later in life, a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Gastroenterology reports. It is therefore important that patients who are diagnosed as children are carefully monitored, argue the researchers behind the study. (2018-10-18)

Medical management of opioid-induced constipation differs from other forms of condition
Traditional laxatives are recommended as first-line agents to treat patients with a confirmed diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, according to a new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association. If an adequate trial of laxatives results in suboptimal symptom control, the guidelines recommend peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) drugs, namely naldemedine, naloxegol and methylnatrexone. (2018-10-17)

Mass. General-led study supports aspirin's ability to reduce liver cancer risk
The results of a study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators support evidence from previous studies suggesting the regular use of aspirin can reduce the risk of developing primary liver cancer -- also called hepatocellular carcinoma. (2018-10-04)

Anti-integrin therapy effect on intestinal immune system in HIV-infected patients
In a study published today in Science Translational Medicine, Mount Sinai researchers describe for the first time a mechanism that may shrink collections of immune cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, called lymphoid aggregates, where HIV may lay sequestered. (2018-10-03)

Study suggests need to include overweight subjects in metabolic research
Children's Hospital Los Angeles investigators have demonstrated the need to include a growing constituency of obese and overweight children and adults in clinical research, with their study of a key marker for metabolism and body temperature control. The study, 'Post-prandial Uridine Physiology is Altered by Obesity,' was published online on August 22 in a letter to the Editorial Board of Gastroenterology. (2018-08-22)

Researchers identify method to diagnose cancer in patients with early onset diabetes
Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer can develop elevated blood sugar levels up to three years before their cancer diagnosis, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published the journal Gastroenterology. (2018-06-20)

BIDMC researchers develop decision-making tool to benefit patients with HCV
BIDMC researchers led a retrospective analysis of four randomized clinical trials focused on the effects of DAA therapies in patients with HCV-associated liver failure, and developed a new means of predicting improvement in liver function in response to DAA treatment. (2018-06-18)

Half of all young children with a rare inherited liver disease need a liver transplant
An international research team has today reported the first results of a study investigating the natural history of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) -- a rare genetic liver disease that predominantly affects children. Most alarmingly, the team reported that, by the age of 10 years, approximately half of the children with two different forms of PFIC had already received a liver transplant. (2018-05-10)

New study finds ginger proven to treat vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis
Researchers presenting at the 51st ESPGHAN Annual Meeting have today revealed the results of a new study which proves the efficacy and effectiveness of using ginger to treat vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis -- one of the most common conditions resulting in admission to pediatric emergency departments. (2018-05-10)

Probiotics and breastfeeding reduces potential antibiotic resistance in children
Targeted probiotic supplementation in breastfed infants can significantly reduce the potential for antibiotic resistance, new research presented today at the 51st ESPGHAN Annual Meeting shows. (2018-05-09)

Invasive procedures should be reserved for a sub-group of acid reflux patients, study says
As the number of Americans with acid reflux grows, a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus says invasive procedures to treat those who don't respond to medication should be done for select patients. (2018-05-08)

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