Current Gastrointestinal Endoscopy News and Events

Current Gastrointestinal Endoscopy News and Events, Gastrointestinal Endoscopy News Articles.
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Chatter between cell populations drives progression of gastrointestinal tumors
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine identified new therapeutic targets for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) that could lead to new treatment options for patients. (2021-02-18)

Antibiotic could be repurposed and added to tuberculosis treatment arsenal
Research has found fidaxomicin, an antibiotic usually used to treat bowel infections, prevents growth of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) in the lab. (2021-02-17)

New potential therapy for Crohn's disease in children
Scientists from the Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago demonstrated that a nanotherapy reduces intestinal inflammation and shrinks lesions in a rodent model of severe Crohn's disease. (2021-02-17)

Probiotics or prebiotics? Exploring the complex world of 'gut' health
Elena Goun at the University of Missouri and an international team of scientists have developed a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool to measure the levels of a naturally occurring enzyme -- bile salt hydrolase -- inside the body's entire gastrointestinal tract. This research could lead to better precision medicine treatments by providing a way for scientists to better understand how a person's individual gut health is connected to various human pathologies, or the origin and nature of human diseases. (2021-02-04)

Deep Vision: Near-infrared imaging and machine learning can identify hidden tumors
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are tumors of the digestive tract that grow underneath the mucus layer covering our organs. Because they are deep inside the tissue, these ''submucosal tumors'' are difficult to detect and diagnose, even with a biopsy. Now, researchers from Japan have developed a novel minimally invasive and accurate method using infrared imaging and machine learning to distinguish between normal tissue and tumor areas. This technique has a strong potential for widespread clinical use. (2021-02-02)

Dairy calves benefit from higher-protein starter feed, Illinois study says
Dairy producers know early nutrition for young calves has far-reaching impacts, both for the long-term health and productivity of the animals and for farm profitability. With the goal of increasing not just body weight but also lean tissue gain, a new University of Illinois study finds enhanced milk replacer with high crude-protein dry starter feed is the winning combination. (2021-01-25)

Deep learning helps predicting occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer
A new study led by the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences shows that deep learning can help predicting the occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer. It provides a novel and noninvasive approach for stomach cancer patients and may inform individualized surgical management of stomach cancer. (2021-01-07)

Viewing upper gastrointestinal cancers in a new light
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report the use of Linked Color Imaging, an innovative modality that specifically combines selected wavelengths of light for illumination in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. This method, by enhancing the subtle variations in red and white hues that indicate mucosal transformation, greatly improves the early detection of upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms as compared with conventional white light illumination. (2021-01-05)

Polysaccharides from red algae affect mice immune systems, say FEFU scientists
Carrageenans, biologically active polysaccharides isolated from red algae and widely used in the food industry as stabilizers, thickeners, or jelly agents have an express effect on the immune systems of mice, a study reports. The research was carried out by scientists from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Vilnius University. A related article appears in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. (2020-12-29)

An avocado a day keeps your gut microbes happy
Eating avocado as part of your daily diet can help improve gut health, a new study from University of Illinois shows. Avocados are a healthy food that is high in dietary fiber and monounsaturated fat. However, it was not clear how avocados impact the microbes in the gastrointestinal system or 'gut.' (2020-12-15)

New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

New fundamental knowledge of the 'abdominal brain'
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have succeeded in mapping the neuron types comprising the enteric nervous system in the intestine of mice. The study, which is published today in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience, also describes how the different neurons form during fetal development, a process that follows different principles to brain neurons. (2020-12-07)

Study identifies links between atopic dermatitis and autoimmune diseases
In a recent study published in the British Journal of Dermatology, individuals with atopic dermatitis, or eczema, were more likely to also have various autoimmune diseases, especially those involving the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, or the connective tissue. (2020-12-07)

Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties. (2020-12-02)

Cancer cases are rising in adolescents and young adults
Cancer cases in adolescents and young adults have risen by 30% during the last four decades, with kidney cancer rising at the greatest rate, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The team said further research into screening, diagnosis and treatment are needed to address the growing trend in this age group. (2020-12-01)

The neurobiology of thirst: The neural mechanisms that control hydration
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) provide deeper insights into neural thirst control. Their study published recently in Nature Communications indicates that cholecystokinin-mediated water-intake suppression is controlled by two neuronal 'thirst-suppressing' sub-populations in the subfornical organ in the brain; one population is persistently activated by excessive water levels, and the other, transiently after drinking water. (2020-11-26)

Simple new testing method aims to improve time-release drugs
UC Riverside engineers filled a glass tube bent like a tuning fork, kept vibrating by a circuit at its resonance frequency, with simulated stomach and intestine contents and passed an over-the-counter time-release drug granule through the tube. They observed a brief change in the frequency. When plotted, they could compare the peaks of resonance frequency against the time to learn the buoyant mass of the drug granule at that moment. (2020-11-24)

Managing the microbiome raises new hope for autism
Analysis of 619 plasma metabolites in a new study show a distinctive metabolic profile in autistic children prior to microbial transfer therapy The procedure helps modify gut microbiota, improving symptoms gastrointestinal and behavioral symptoms of the disease. Careful investigation of metabolites in blood and feces, as opposed to simply tabulating microbial species in the gut, is crucial when trying to tease out the complex bacterial interactions, which can form both collaborative and competing networks, depending on the particulars of their environment. (2020-11-13)

Gut check: Teff grain boosts stomach microbiome health
Cornell University food scientists confirm that the grain teff helps the stomach and enhances the nutritional value of iron and zinc, according to a new modeling method. (2020-11-13)

Experts release new management strategies for malignant colorectal polyps
Early identification and removal of cancerous colorectal polyps is critical to preventing the progression of colorectal cancer and improving survival rates. The U.S. Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer has released new guidance for endoscopists on how to assess colorectal lesions for features associated with cancer, discuss how these factors guide management, and outline when to advise surgery after malignant polyp removal. (2020-11-04)

Review finds almost 20% of COVID-19 patients only show gastrointestinal symptoms
Almost one in five patients with COVID-19 may only show gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a review of academic studies published in the journal Abdominal Radiology. The findings of the review suggest abdominal radiologists need to remain vigilant during the pandemic while imaging patients. (2020-11-03)

Microbes in the gut could be protective against hazardous radiation exposure
A study by scientists at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and colleagues showed that mice exposed to potentially lethal levels of total body radiation were protected from radiation damage if they had specific types of bacteria in their gut. They demonstrated that the bacteria mitigated radiation exposure and enhanced the recovery of blood cell production as well as repair of the gastrointestinal tract. (2020-10-30)

UArizona Health Sciences researchers find biomarker that can appear before stomach cancer
A microRNA that can be found in a blood sample may make it easier to detect gastric cancer and could lead to improved treatment for the disease and others like it that are resistant to common immunotherapies. (2020-10-20)

Even mild fatty liver disease is linked to increased mortality
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD, affects nearly one in four adults in Europe and the U.S. Earlier research has demonstrated an increased risk of death in patients with NAFLD and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Massachusetts General Hospital in the U.S. show that mortality increases with disease severity, but even mild fatty liver disease is linked to higher mortality. The findings have been published in the journal Gut. (2020-10-12)

Asthma and food allergies during childhood associated with increased risk of IBS
Those with IBS at 16 were almost twice as likely to have had asthma at the age of 12 (11.2% vs 6.7%). Almost half of children with IBS at 16 (40.7%) reported food hypersensitivity at 12 years (compared to 29.2% of children without IBS at 16). (2020-10-11)

More than 40% of women suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth
Women are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth than at any other time in their life, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-10-09)

Fighting intestinal infections with the body's own endocannabinoids
Endocannabinoids, signaling molecules produced in the body that share features with chemicals found in marijuana, can shut down genes needed for some pathogenic intestinal bacteria to colonize, multiply, and cause disease, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists shows. (2020-10-07)

High-fibre diet, low level inflammation: sidestepping the effects of radiation
Loved or hated, the humble oat could be the new superfood for cancer patients as international research shows a diet rich in fibre could significantly reduce radiation-induced gut inflammation. (2020-09-29)

Researchers combine photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging in tiny package
Researchers have demonstrated a new endoscope that uniquely combines photoacoustic and fluorescent imaging in a device about the thickness of a human hair. The device could one day provide new insights into the brain by enabling blood dynamics to be measured at the same time as neuronal activity. (2020-09-21)

Sampling the gut microbiome with an ingestible pill
Gut microbes affect human health, but there is still much to learn, in part because they're not easy to collect. But researchers now report in ACS Nano that they have developed an ingestible capsule that in rat studies captured bacteria and other biological samples while passing through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. (2020-09-09)

ENT physicians and researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Virtual Annual Meeting
During the AAO-HNSF 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, which runs from September 13 through October 25, the most current research in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be introduced during the Scientific Oral Presentations. Scientific Oral Presentations are a series of three- to six-minute presentations focusing on current evidence-based research, surgical procedures, and approaches in clinical sciences and their application to patient care. (2020-09-09)

Gut microbes could allow space travelers to stay healthy on long voyages
Space travel is associated with a variety of negative health effects, including bone loss and mental health issues, which could limit our ability to undertake long-distance space missions, such as a mission to Mars. A new review highlights the potential of treatments that enhance gut microbes as a way to protect space travelers during long voyages. (2020-09-08)

Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks. (2020-09-02)

AGA recommends bidirectional endoscopy for most patients with iron deficiency anemia
The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new clinical guidelines outlining an evidence-based approach for the initial gastrointestinal evaluation of chronic iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic patients. Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common worldwide, and a gastrointestinal cause should be considered in all patients without an obvious cause for their anemia. (2020-09-01)

Synthetic coating for the GI tract could deliver drugs or aid in digestion
MIT engineers have devised a way to apply a temporary synthetic coating to the lining of the small intestine. This coating could be adapted to deliver drugs, aid in digestion, or prevent nutrients such as glucose from being absorbed. (2020-08-26)

Gastrointestinal innovation holds potential for treating variety of conditions
Proof-of-concept studies in models of lactose intolerance, diabetes and infectious disease demonstrate potential applications. (2020-08-26)

New guidelines for managing mucositis now available
New guidelines are now available to provide healthcare professionals with better tools to manage mucositis, a common and often debilitating complication of cancer therapy. (2020-08-11)

GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children, especially those with autism
A new UC Davis Health study found that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubling sleep problems, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children. According to the study, published Aug. 6 in Autism Research, these GI symptoms are much more common and potentially disruptive in young kids with autism. (2020-08-10)

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission during flexible laryngoscopy
Researchers review evidence on the risks of aerosolization and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from patients to health care workers during endoscopy of the upper aerodigestive tract. (2020-07-30)

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem
Scientists gathered and published over 200 000 genomes from the human gut microbiome. The catalogue reveals that more than 70% of bacterial species in the human gut have never been grown in the lab. This new data resource could be extremely useful to investigate how the bacterial community in the human gut influences human health and disease. (2020-07-27)

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