Current Gastrointestinal Tract News and Events

Current Gastrointestinal Tract News and Events, Gastrointestinal Tract News Articles.
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'Good bacteria' in breast milk changes over time
The cocktail of beneficial bacteria passed from mother to infant through breast milk changes significantly over time and could act like a daily booster shot for infant immunity and metabolism. The research, conducted by scientists from Montreal and Guatemala and published in Frontiers in Microbiology, has important implications for infant development and health. (2021-02-23)

LSU Health New Orleans study finds disadvantaged census tracts linked to COVID incidence
An LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health study reports a positive association between social vulnerability and COVID-19 incidence at the census tract level and recommends that more resources be allocated to socially vulnerable populations to reduce the incidence of COVID-19. (2021-02-23)

Chatter between cell populations drives progression of gastrointestinal tumors
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine identified new therapeutic targets for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) that could lead to new treatment options for patients. (2021-02-18)

Antibiotic could be repurposed and added to tuberculosis treatment arsenal
Research has found fidaxomicin, an antibiotic usually used to treat bowel infections, prevents growth of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) in the lab. (2021-02-17)

How the immune system paves the way for SARS-CoV-2
The immune system actually wants to fight SARS-CoV-2 with antiviral signaling molecules. But a research team from Charité and MDC has now shown how such a signaling molecule can promote the replication of the virus. The results have been published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. (2021-02-16)

Researchers propose that humidity from masks may lessen severity of COVID-19
Masks help protect the people wearing them from getting or spreading SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, but now researchers from the National Institutes of Health have added evidence for yet another potential benefit for wearers: The humidity created inside the mask may help combat respiratory diseases such as COVID-19. (2021-02-12)

Smectite promotes probiotic biofilm formation in gut for cancer immunotherapy
Orally administrating probiotics is ineffective due to the poor inhabitation of exogenous bacteria in host intestines. Chinese scientists report that smectite, a type of mineral clay and classical anti-diarrhoea drug, can promote the expansion of probiotics in the murine gut that subsequently elicits anti-tumor immune responses. Their findings suggest a novel approach to specifically enrich probiotics in the body, with high translational potential for cancer immunotherapy. (2021-02-10)

RUDN University veterinarians tested a new drug against pneumonia in calves
Respiratory tract diseases in young animals of the cattle are a big issue for world agriculture and food safety because a bacterium that causes them is resistant to most antibiotics. A team of veterinarians from RUDN University developed and tested a complex preparation called gentaminoseleferon that could help treat respiratory infection in calves. (2021-02-10)

Scientists uncover four new facts about early SARS-CoV-2 infections
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers studied SARS-CoV-2 infections at individual cellular levels and made four major discoveries about the virus, including one that validates the effectiveness of remdesivir - an FDA-approved antiviral drug - as a form of treatment for severe COVID-19 disease. (2021-02-10)

A novel approach to determine how carcinogenic bacteria find their targets
The gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize the stomachs of the majority of the world's population. Although most people may never experience major complications due to the pathogen, H. pylori infections increase the risk of certain types of gastric cancer, as well as other illnesses such as peptic ulcers and gastritis. (2021-02-10)

Phages can anticipate bacteria's location and destroy them before they cause an infection
A novel strategy has the potential of becoming a game changer in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria that live in hard-to-reach places. (2021-02-09)

Researchers identify a new molecular mechanism related to severe anaphylaxis
In a study led by researchers of the University of Barcelona and IDIBAPS, researchers analyzed the mutation of a gen detected in a patient who suffered from recurrent anaphylactic shocks caused by the allergy to paper wasp venom (Polistes dominula). The results, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, revealed a new molecular mechanism that can control the degree of severity in an anaphylactic reaction. (2021-02-09)

Identification of three genes that determine the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells
Tissue stem cells can self-renew and differentiate, supplying cells necessary for tissues at various developmental stages. However, detailed analysis in vivo is difficult, so the molecular mechanisms underlying the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells have remained a mystery. Here, by using organoids that mimic tissue structure and function in vivo and GeCKO screening to inactivate arbitrary genes, Alk, Bclaf3 and Prkra have been identified as genes regulating stemness. (2021-02-08)

Microbiota transfer therapy for autism: Multi-omic approaches and lessons learned
Recent studies in mice and humans have revealed intriguing links between the composition of gut microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a disease believed to affect one in 54 children, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Krajmalnik-Brown's lecture will propose linkages between gut bacteria and ASD, highlighting encouraging results of a microbiome-targeted, ASD open-label clinical trial. (2021-02-08)

Nehandertals' gut microbiota and the bacteria helping our health
Through the study of ancient DNA from 50,000-year-old Neanderthal faecal sediments, an international research group isolated a group of micro-organisms whose characteristics are similar to those of modern Sapiens: such findings can be instrumental to the protection of our gut microbiota (2021-02-05)

Fungi in the gut prime immunity against infection
Common fungi, often present in the gut, teach the immune system how to respond to their more dangerous relatives, according to new research from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine. Breakdowns in this process can leave people susceptible to deadly fungal infections. (2021-02-05)

Solving chronic pain during intercourse
Women suffering from chronic conditions that result in painful intercourse represent about 10% of females of reproductive age - triggering a combined economic burden of more than $7.7 billion per year - yet scant knowledge about the origins of this pain is preventing an effective way to treat it. (2021-02-04)

Probiotics or prebiotics? Exploring the complex world of 'gut' health
Elena Goun at the University of Missouri and an international team of scientists have developed a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool to measure the levels of a naturally occurring enzyme -- bile salt hydrolase -- inside the body's entire gastrointestinal tract. This research could lead to better precision medicine treatments by providing a way for scientists to better understand how a person's individual gut health is connected to various human pathologies, or the origin and nature of human diseases. (2021-02-04)

Lactobacillus manipulates bile acids to create favorable gut environment
Probiotic Lactobacillus bacteria use enzymes situationally to manipulate bile acids and promote their own survival in the gut. (2021-02-01)

Nasal spray that protects against COVID-19 is also effective against the common cold
Research into a new drug, known as INNA-X, which primes the immune system in the respiratory tract and is in development for COVID-19 shows it is also effective against rhinovirus. Rhinovirus is the most common respiratory virus, the main cause of the common cold and is responsible for exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (2021-02-01)

Dairy calves benefit from higher-protein starter feed, Illinois study says
Dairy producers know early nutrition for young calves has far-reaching impacts, both for the long-term health and productivity of the animals and for farm profitability. With the goal of increasing not just body weight but also lean tissue gain, a new University of Illinois study finds enhanced milk replacer with high crude-protein dry starter feed is the winning combination. (2021-01-25)

For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that patients with Barrett's esophagus may be vulnerable to coronavirus infection from what they swallow. (2021-01-20)

Expanded PET imaging time window adds flexibility for neuroendocrine tumor patients
The imaging time window of 64Cu-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms can be expanded from one hour to three hours post-injection, according to new research published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. In a head-to-head comparison of scans performed at the two time intervals, there were no significant differences in the number of lesions detected, and tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained high in all key organs. (2021-01-20)

Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth. (2021-01-13)

Poor gut health connected to severe COVID-19, new review shows
In a review published this week in mBio, researchers examined emerging evidence suggesting that poor gut health adversely affects COVID-19 prognosis. (2021-01-12)

Singing a tumor test song
Singing may be the next-generation, noninvasive approach to determining the health of a patient's thyroid. When a person sings, the vibrations create waves in the tissue near the vocal tract called shear waves. If a tumor is present in the thyroid, the elasticity of its surrounding tissue increases, stiffening, and causing the shear waves to accelerate. Using ultrasound imaging to measure these waves, researchers can determine the elasticity of the thyroid tissue. (2021-01-12)

NTU Singapore develops oral insulin nanoparticles that could be an alternative to jabs
NTU Singapore scientists have developed insulin nanoparticles that may become an alternative to insulin injections for diabetics. Delivering insulin orally would be preferable over insulin jabs because it causes less pain, but remains challenging because insulin gets degraded in the gut before it can reach the bloodstream to regulate blood glucose. To overcome this challenge, the scientists designed a nanoparticle loaded with insulin at the core, then coated with alternating layers of insulin and chitosan. (2021-01-11)

Tiny wireless device sheds light on combating obesity
In a new study, researchers at Texas A&M University have described a medical device that might help with weight loss and requires a simpler operative procedure for implantation. (2021-01-08)

Deep learning helps predicting occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer
A new study led by the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences shows that deep learning can help predicting the occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer. It provides a novel and noninvasive approach for stomach cancer patients and may inform individualized surgical management of stomach cancer. (2021-01-07)

Gut microbe may promote breast cancers
A microbe found in the colon and commonly associated with the development of colitis and colon cancer also may play a role in the development of some breast cancers, according to new research from investigators with the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. (2021-01-06)

Viewing upper gastrointestinal cancers in a new light
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report the use of Linked Color Imaging, an innovative modality that specifically combines selected wavelengths of light for illumination in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. This method, by enhancing the subtle variations in red and white hues that indicate mucosal transformation, greatly improves the early detection of upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms as compared with conventional white light illumination. (2021-01-05)

Diet and lifestyle guidelines can greatly reduce gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms
Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition affecting 30% of the US population and often controlled with medication. While doctors commonly recommend specific dietary and lifestyle changes to control symptoms, there is little evidence about their effectiveness. Results of a large-scale study suggest such changes, including regular exercise, can reduce symptoms substantially. (2021-01-05)

Polysaccharides from red algae affect mice immune systems, say FEFU scientists
Carrageenans, biologically active polysaccharides isolated from red algae and widely used in the food industry as stabilizers, thickeners, or jelly agents have an express effect on the immune systems of mice, a study reports. The research was carried out by scientists from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Vilnius University. A related article appears in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. (2020-12-29)

Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people. The caution comes from a study in PNAS in which scientists found that experimental piglets infected with RESTV developed severe respiratory disease and shed the virus from the upper respiratory tract. RESTV can infect humans but isn't known to cause disease. Now the scientists express concern that pigs could serve as an ''interim or amplifying host for ebolaviruses.'' (2020-12-21)

Connections determine everything
A team of scientists, with the first author from the HSE University, were investigating which factors are the most important for the upper limb motor recovery after a stroke. The study is published in Stroke, the world's leading journal for cerebrovascular pathology. (2020-12-16)

An avocado a day keeps your gut microbes happy
Eating avocado as part of your daily diet can help improve gut health, a new study from University of Illinois shows. Avocados are a healthy food that is high in dietary fiber and monounsaturated fat. However, it was not clear how avocados impact the microbes in the gastrointestinal system or 'gut.' (2020-12-15)

Microbes in dental plaque look more like relatives in soil than those on the tongue
A new study out of UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory used state-of-the-art sequencing technology to deep-screen the genomes of microbes known as TM7 present in the mouth. This approach determined that TM7 species living on the tongue more closely resembled those found in the GI tract, while TM7 species in dental plaque more closely resembled environmental species, providing a hint at how plaque may have played a role in microbial colonization of the body. (2020-12-15)

Beta-blockers display anti-inflammatory effects in advanced liver disease
Beta-blockers are used to prevent internal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Researchers from MedUni Vienna have now shown that Beta-blockers also have beneficial effects on systemic inflammation and this translates into improved clinical outcomes. (2020-12-10)

Toxin provides clues to long-term effects of diarrhea caused by E. coli
A study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that a toxin produced by E. coli changes intestinal cells to benefit itself, an ability that could provide a clue to why the bacteria have been linked to nutritional problems such as malnutrition and stunted growth. (2020-12-09)

New fundamental knowledge of the 'abdominal brain'
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have succeeded in mapping the neuron types comprising the enteric nervous system in the intestine of mice. The study, which is published today in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience, also describes how the different neurons form during fetal development, a process that follows different principles to brain neurons. (2020-12-07)

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