Current Geckos News and Events

Current Geckos News and Events, Geckos News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 4 | 130 Results
Penned release of green geckos has potential to help preserve threatened native species
In a paper just published in the New Zealand Journal of Ecology, the Department of Zoology researchers outlined how they translocated 19 barking geckos to Mana Island, using the method of penned release - enclosing them in a 100m² pen for three months so they get used to the site and hopefully establish a breeding population. (2021-01-13)

Plant-based spray could be used in n95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Horizons. (2020-10-07)

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat
Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog -- could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia. (2020-06-04)

To climb like a gecko, robots need toes
Researchers know the secret to geckos' ability to walk on the ceiling: their hairy toes. But how do they use their five toes per foot to adjust to gravity when running horizontally along walls. At UC Berkeley, biologists used high-speed cameras to record how geckos orient their toes with shifting weight, especially when encountering slippery or rough patches, and found a remarkable ability to adjust toe orientation to stick and peel while running full speed. (2020-05-08)

Scientists discover bent-toed gecko species in Cambodia
A new species of bent-toed gecko (Cyrtodactylus phnomchiensis) has been described from Cambodia's Prey Lang Wildlife Sanctuary by Wild Earth Allies Biologist Thy Neang in collaboration with North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences' Herpetologist Bryan Stuart. 'It was an extremely unexpected discovery. No one thought there were undescribed species in Prey Lang,' said Neang. (2020-04-13)

'Self-cleaning' concrete could keep buildings looking new (video)
Building materials that clean themselves could save immense time and labor in homes and businesses, as well as reduce disease risk in settings such as hospitals. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a new type of concrete that is strong, heat-insulating and soundproof -- and best of all, liquids like milk and coffee bounce right off of it, taking dust particles with them. (2019-11-20)

In the shadow of the dinosaurs
Research published this Wednesday in Scientific Reports describes Clevosaurus hadroprodon, a new reptile species from Rio Grande do Sul state in southern Brazil. (2019-08-14)

Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber
Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. Researchers have discovered a bird foot from 99 million years ago preserved in amber that had a hyper-elongated third toe. The study, published in the journal Current Biology on July 11, 2019, suggests that this bird might have used its toes to hook food out of tree trucks. This is the first time such a foot structure has been observed in birds. (2019-07-11)

Penn engineers demonstrate superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime
Snails can anchor themselves in place using a structure known as an epiphragm. The snail's slimy secretion works its way into the pores found on even seemingly smooth surfaces, then hardens, providing strong adhesion that can be reversed when the slime softens. Penn Engineers have developed a new material that works in a similar way. (2019-06-17)

Tiger geckos in Vietnam could be the next species sold into extinction, shows a new survey
While information about the conservation status of the tiger gecko species is largely missing, these Asian lizards are already particularly vulnerable to extinction. A study, published in the open-access journal Nature Conservation, provides an overview of their domestic and international trade with a focus on species native to Vietnam. By providing further knowledge about the species abundance and threats for the Vietnamese Cat Ba tiger gecko, the research team urges for strict conservation measures. (2019-04-01)

Watch how geckos run across water
Geckos run across water at up to almost a meter a second using a unique mix of surface tension and slapping, say researchers reporting Dec. 6 in the journal Current Biology. They found that the mouse-sized lizards are too big to float on water using only surface tension, like insects, but too small to use only foot slapping, like basilisks. (2018-12-06)

Acrobatic geckos, highly maneuverable on land and in the air, can also race on water
Asian geckos were observed running over water at nearly a meter per second, as fast as on land. Lab experiments at UC Berkeley show how. They get support from surface tension but also slap the water rapidly with their feet. They also semi-plane over the surface and use their tail for stabilization and propulsion. They thus sit between insects, which use only surface tension, and larger animals, which run upright via foot slapping alone. (2018-12-06)

Study explains how geckos gracefully gallop on water
Geckos are amazingly agile. In addition to running across land and up trees, the animals can prance across the surface of water. A new study reveals how they do it. (2018-12-06)

New materials: Growing polymer pelts
Polymer pelts made of the finest of fibers are suitable for many different applications, from coatings that adhere well and are easy to remove to highly sensitive biological detectors. Researchers at KIT together with scientists in the United States have now developed a cost-effective process to allow customized polymer nanofibers to grow on a solid substrate through vapor deposition of a liquid crystal layer with reactive molecules. (2018-11-16)

Tiny light detectors work like gecko ears
By structuring nanowires in a way that mimics geckos' ears, researchers have found a way to record the incoming angle of light. This technology could have applications in robotic vision, photography and augmented reality. (2018-10-30)

U of G study is first to find evidence that leopard geckos can make new brain cells
University of Guelph researchers have discovered the type of stem cell allowing geckos to create new brain cells. This finding provides evidence that lizards may also be able to regenerate parts of the brain after injury. (2018-07-27)

Some like it hot!
Ecologists have no doubt that climate change will affect the earth's animals and plants. But how exactly? This is often hard to predict. There are already indications that some species are shifting their distribution range. But it is much less clear how individual animals and populations are responding to the changes. Scientists at the UFZ have been studying nocturnal desert geckos to see how they are adapting to climatic changes. (2018-05-24)

Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckos
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces. (2018-02-14)

Research reveals swaths of Asia inhabited by surprisingly related 'Lizards of the Lost Arcs'
A varied collection of lizards throughout Asia are unexpectedly close cousins of beach-dwelling mourning geckos, all descended from a common ancestor species that thrived along an ancient archipelago in the West Pacific that served as a 'superhighway' of biodiversity. (2018-01-25)

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive
Some animals, such as geckos, can easily climb up walls and across ceilings. But currently, no material exists that allows everyday people to scale walls or transverse ceilings as effortlessly. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces a dry adhesive that could someday make it easier to defy gravity. (2018-01-10)

Study finds 'black box' methods used by biologists probably overestimate number of new species
A study published in the journal Molecular Ecology demonstrates the misuse and abuse of methods scientists commonly use to place boundaries between different species. (2017-11-14)

University of Guelph study first to identify the cells driving gecko's ability to re-grow its tail
A U of G researcher has discovered the spinal cord of the gecko's tail houses a special type of stem cell known as the radial glia. When the tail detaches, these cells jump into action by proliferating and making different proteins in response to the injury. The result is a brand new spinal cord. This finding has implications for developing a way to treat humans with spinal cord injuries. (2017-11-02)

An evolving sticky situation
While many animals try to avoid sticky situations, lizards evolved to seek them out. Travis Hagey, Michigan State University evolutionary biologist, shows how different groups of lizards -- geckos and anoles -- took two completely different evolutionary paths to developing the beneficial trait of sticky toe pads. (2017-10-12)

Tree-climbing geckos that use narrower perches have longer limbs than expected
Tree-climbing geckos that use narrow perches have relatively longer limbs than comparisons with other tree-climbing lizards would suggest, according to a study published Sept. 27, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Travis Hagey from Michigan State University, US, and colleagues. (2017-09-27)

How tails help geckos and other vertebrates make great strides
A wagging tail is often associated with dogs' emotions, but the side-to-side motion may also help them take longer strides and move faster, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside. The research was done on leopard geckos, which are ideal animals for the study of tail function because they naturally lose their tails as a defense mechanism against predators in a process called autotomy. (2017-09-07)

Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatened
When trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos raises a herpetological mystery: If they have armor, why do they discard it? (2017-08-03)

Pregnancy loss and the evolution of sex are linked by cellular line dance
In new research published this week (Aug. 1, 2017) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Levitis and his collaborators report that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring. And not just for humans. Creatures from geckos to garlic and cactuses to cockroaches pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction. (2017-08-01)

Despite a great grip, geckos sometimes slip
A new theoretical study examines for the first time the limits of geckos' gripping ability in natural contexts. (2017-07-19)

Bio-fuel from waste
Fuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now managed to significantly reduce the temperature and energy requirements of a key step in the chemical process. The trick: The reaction takes place in very confined spaces inside zeolite crystals. (2017-06-28)

Stanford engineers design a robotic gripper for cleaning up space debris
Researchers combined gecko-inspired adhesives and a custom robotic gripper to create a device for grabbing space debris. They tested their gripper in multiple zero gravity settings, including the International Space Station. (2017-06-28)

Leaping lizards!
Many geckos inhabit trees, often living high in the canopy. Relying on their incredible adhesive strength to help them break their fall, they jump from trees, and land on leaves or smooth tree trunks. A team of researchers led by a biologist at the University of California, Riverside now reports that the gecko adhesive system may reach its functional limits in extreme situations, such as when a gecko falls/jumps from the canopy of a rainforest. (2017-06-27)

Synthetic two-sided gecko's foot could enable underwater robotics
Geckos are well known for effortlessly scrambling up walls and upside down across ceilings. Even in slippery rain forests, the lizards maintain their grip. Now scientists have created a double-sided adhesive that copies this reversible ability to stick and unstick to surfaces even in wet conditions. They say their development, reported in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry C, could be useful in underwater robotics, sensors and other bionic devices. (2017-04-26)

UMass Amherst polymer scientist wins international research award
Polymer scientist Alfred Crosby at UMass Amherst is part of a team that received a three-year, $1 million grant from the Human Frontier Science Program. Crosby and two others will each receive $350,000 over the three years to explore 'universal surface patterning mechanisms in plants and animals.' This refers to how the development and growth of tall, narrow nanoscale wrinkles in plants and animals may be related in all living organisms. (2017-03-22)

Frogs have unique ability to see color in the dark
The night vision of frogs and toads appears to be superior to that of all other animals. They have the ability to see color even when it is so dark that humans are not able to see anything at all. This has been shown in a new study by researchers from Lund University in Sweden. (2017-02-28)

New species: Gecko with tear-away skin
Fish-scale geckos in the genus Geckolepis are able to lose their skin at the slightest touch. (2017-02-07)

A new species of gecko with massive scales and tear-away skin
Many lizards can drop their tails when grabbed, but one group of geckos has gone to particularly extreme lengths to escape predation. Fish-scale geckos in the genus Geckolepis have large scales that tear away with ease, leaving them free to escape whilst the predator is left with a mouth full of scales. Scientists have now described a new species (Geckolepis megalepis) that is the master of this art, possessing the largest scales of any gecko. (2017-02-07)

Eat and be eaten: Invasive scavengers in Hawaii alter island nutrient cycle
Researchers from the University of Georgia have found that invasive species on Hawaii Island may be especially successful invaders because they are formidable scavengers of carcasses of other animals and after death, a nutrient resource for other invasive scavengers. (2016-12-13)

How gecko feet got sticky
Timothy Higham, a biologist at the University of California, Riverside, and two colleagues have found a gecko, Gonatodes humeralis, in Trinidad and French Guiana that offers a 'snapshot' into the evolution of adhesion in geckos. This padless gecko shows how the adhesive capabilities of pad-bearing geckos, such as tokay geckos, may have come about. (2016-10-06)

USC-led study identifies a key to bone formation and vertebrate evolution
Researchers in a USC-led study said they have identified a key action of a watershed gene critical to bone formation and the evolution of vertebrates. The Sp7 or Osterix gene more than likely emerged from an ancestral gene family about 400 million years ago, expanding the diversity of life and programming the development of bone-secreting osteoblast cells. The closest living relatives to vertebrates, including sea squirts and lampreys, lack bone and an Sp7 gene. (2016-04-28)

The scaled king and his knight: 2 new giant bent-toed gecko species from New Guinea
The extremely complex geological history of New Guinea has allowed many of its animals and plants the chance to grow different enough to make a name for themselves. In the case of two newly described and unusually large gecko species -- only a noble name would do. The two new species, whose names respectively mean 'knight' and 'king', were discovered by a team led by Dr. Paul Oliver and are described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2016-02-10)

Page 1 of 4 | 130 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.