Current Gender Bias News and Events

Current Gender Bias News and Events, Gender Bias News Articles.
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Distorting memories helps the brain remember
In order to remember similar events, the brain exaggerates the difference between them. This results in divergent brain activity patterns but better memory performance, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-02-22)

Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

To end HIV epidemic, we must address health disparities
despite coordinated national efforts to implement HIV services, the epidemic persists, especially in the South. It also disproportionately impacts marginalized groups, such as Black/African-American and Latinx communities, women, people who use drugs, men who have sex with men, and other sexual and gender minorities. researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders reported on the HIV epidemic response in The Lancet HIV in the USA Series, published online today (https://www.thelancet.com/series/HIVinUSA). (2021-02-19)

Study finds no gender discrimination when leaders use confident language
People tend to listen to big talkers, whether they are women or men. Still, more women prefer not to use assertive language, according to a new study. Participants in an experiment more often followed advice of people using assertive ''cheap talk,'' statements that cannot be verified as true. (Example: ''I have extremely strong problem-solving skills.'') They followed advice regardless of advice giver's gender but thought others would be less likely to follow female leaders' advice. (2021-02-18)

Study finds risk factor for blood clots occurs in more than 10 percent of transgender men using testosterone
A potentially dangerous side effect of testosterone therapy for transgender men is an increase in red blood cells that can raise the risk of blood clots, heart attack or stroke, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-02-18)

How to improve gender equity in medicine
Gender equity and racial diversity in medicine can promote creative solutions to complex health problems and improve the delivery of high-quality care, argue authors in an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-16)

Predicting words' grammatical properties helps us read faster
Psycholinguists from the HSE Centre for Language and Brain found that when reading, people are not only able to predict specific words, but also words' grammatical properties, which helps them to read faster. Researchers have also discovered that predictability of words and grammatical features can be successfully modelled with the use of neural networks. The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-16)

Study finds gender disparities on National Institutes of Health study sections
Investigators at the University of Chicago Medicine have found that women are less likely to be represented as chairs and reviewers on study sections for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), based on data from one review cycle in 2019. (2021-02-15)

Study explores neurocognitive basis of bias against people who look different
A new brain-and-behavior study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania clarifies how the ''anomalous-is-bad'' stereotype manifests, and implicates a brain region called the amygdala as one of the likely mediators of this stereotype. (2021-02-12)

Diversity in policing can improve police-civilian interactions
Black and Hispanic officers make far fewer stops and arrests and use less force than white officers, especially against Black civilians, when facing otherwise common circumstances. Hispanic officers also engage in less enforcement activity. Female officers of all races also use less force than males. (2021-02-11)

The politics of synonyms
A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns. The results are available in the February issue of the journal PLOS. (2021-02-11)

Gender gap: Women represent two-thirds of doctorates, only one-third of academic jobs
Women today represent two-thirds of all Canadian doctorates in archaeology, but only one-third of Canadian tenure-stream faculty. While men with Canadian PhDs have done well in securing tenure-track jobs in Canada over the past 15 years, women have not, according to a new study from McGill University. The current COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate these existing inequalities. (2021-02-11)

Want to hire more women? Expand your short list
As more male-dominated industries look for ways to hire women, new Cornell University research offers employers a simple solution -- make your initial job candidate short list longer. (2021-02-11)

Learn what you live? Study finds watching others can reduce decision bias
New research finds first evidence that watching and learning from others can help reduce bias and improve decision-making. In business, the results could help improve hiring practices or increase cost savings. (2021-02-11)

Links between pollution and cancer in wild animals: what can we learn?
This recent review combines the information available on cancer occurrences in aquatic and semi-aquatic animals. Cancer is one of the pollution-induced diseases that should be at the centre of attention in ecological and evolutionary research. Authors suggest physiological mechanisms that link pollution and cancer, determine which types of aquatic animals are more vulnerable to pollution-induced cancer, which types of pollution are mainly associated with cancer in aquatic ecosystems, and which types of cancer pollution causes. (2021-02-10)

Really random networks
New mathematical method for generating random connected networks (2021-02-10)

'Left behind' adolescent women must be prioritised within sustainable development agenda
The needs of millions of overlooked, 'left behind' adolescent women must become a more significant priority within international efforts to end poverty by 2030, a UK Government-commissioned report is urging. (2021-02-10)

Vaccine confidence grows under new administration, latest CUNY SPH Survey reveals
Under the Biden Administration, New Yorkers' acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased significantly. In September, 55% of residents reported they would take the vaccine when it became available and this January, 64% reported they would take it. (2021-02-09)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

Study reveals gender imbalance in scholarly submissions during pandemic
A study conducted by Michelle Bell, Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale School of the Environment (YSE), and postdoctoral associate Kelvin C. Fong found the rate of manuscript submission to a major peer-reviewed journal (American Journal of Public Health) were higher during the pandemic -- but also revealed a concerning imbalance in submissions by gender. (2021-02-03)

Scientists believe studies by colleagues are more prone to biases than their own studies
The properties of human mind affect the quality of scientific knowledge through the insertion of unconscious cognitive biases. Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that the current level of awareness about research biases is generally low among ecology scientists. Underestimation of the risks associated with unconscious cognitive biases prevents avoiding these risks in a scientist's own research. Due to unconscious origin of biases, it is impossible to combat them without external intervention. (2021-02-03)

Research indicates gender disparity in academic achievement and leadership positions
New research on gender inequality indicates that fewer leadership prospects in the workplace apply even to women who show the most promise early on in their academic careers. (2021-02-03)

Amazon spreads vaccine misinformation, iSchool researchers find
Amazon's search algorithm gives preferential treatment to books that promote false claims about vaccines, according to research by UW Information School Ph.D. student Prerna Juneja and Assistant Professor Tanu Mitra. (2021-02-02)

Americans like sports, but heterosexual men especially do
Nearly nine out of 10 Americans say they enjoy sports at least a little, but heterosexual men more commonly identify as passionate sports fans, a new study suggests. A survey of nearly 4,000 American adults found that only 11% said they did not identify as sports fans at all. Over 40% were passionate fans, identifying themselves as being ''quite a bit'' or ''very much so'' sports fans. (2021-01-29)

'Be a man': Why some men respond aggressively to threats to manhood
When their manhood is threatened, some men respond more aggressively than others. New research from Duke University suggests who may be most triggered by such threats - younger men whose sense of masculinity depends heavily on other people's opinions. ''The more social pressure a man feels to be masculine, the more aggressive he may be,'' said Adam Stanaland, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology and public policy at Duke and the study's lead author. (2021-01-28)

World's largest opinion survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action
An innovative UNDP global survey conducted in collaboration with Oxford University experts -- the largest-ever opinion survey on climate change (1.2 million people in 50 countries) -- finds 64% (+/- 2%) deem climate an 'emergency.' Worldwide, most people clearly want a strong and wide-ranging policy response, and 4 of 18 policy options received majority support. Distributed across mobile gaming networks the survey drew 550,000 hard-to-reach youth respondents (14-18 years old) (2021-01-27)

Losing weight before knee surgery may not be beneficial for people with arthritis: Study
University of Alberta researchers find no evidence that BMI is a good determinant of surgical outcomes for osteoarthritis. (2021-01-27)

Addressing health disparities in diabetes requires a broader look at systemic racism
Poor social conditions caused by systemic racism contribute to health disparities in people with diabetes, according to a paper published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-01-26)

New advances in the detection of bias in face recognition algorithms
A team from the Computer Vision Center (CVC) and the University of Barcelona has published the results of a study that evaluates the accuracy and bias in gender and skin colour of automatic face recognition algorithms tested with real world data. Although the top solutions exceed the 99.9% of accuracy, researchers have detected some groups that show higher false positive or false negative rates. (2021-01-25)

Survey: barriers, not demographics, affect willingness to pursue veterinary care
When it comes to seeking veterinary care for dogs, barriers to access - including a lack of trust - have more effect on the decision-making process than differences in race, gender or socioeconomic status. (2021-01-25)

Sliding life expectancy poses gender and inequity questions
Life expectancy gain is slowing in Australia - and figures show these figures are already sliding backwards in both the US and UK - yet little is being done by policy makers to understand specific gender and inequity reasons why this slip is occurring. (2021-01-22)

Research shows preference for male children is declining in Bangladesh
Research from the University of Kent has demonstrated a decline in 'son preference' by women of childbearing age in Bangladesh. However, the study also shows that fertility decisions are still influenced according to son preference. (2021-01-22)

How clicks on a job platform can reveal bias
Scientists at ETH Zurich have leveraged big data from recruitment platforms and machine learning to study hiring discrimination. They show that discrimination against immigrants depends, among other things, on the time of day; and that both men and women face discrimination. (2021-01-21)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Prenatal BPA exposure may contribute to the male bias of autism spectrum disorder
Autism has a higher prevalence in males than females. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a common chemical found in plastics, our food, and even the human placenta. Higher prenatal exposure to BPA is thought to increase the risk of autism. Researchers have, for the first time, identified autism candidate genes that may be responsible for the sex-specific effects of BPA. (2021-01-19)

Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers. (2021-01-19)

Vermont's BIPOC drivers are most likely to have a run-in with police, study shows
Examining more than 800,000 police stops in Vermont between 2014 to 2019, researchers confirm that Vermont authorities stop, ticket, arrest and search Black drivers at a rate far beyond their share of the state's total driving population. (2021-01-18)

The brain region responsible for self-bias in memory
A brain region involved in processing information about ourselves biases our ability to remember, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-01-18)

College classrooms are still chilly for women, as men speak more
Men speak 1.6 times more often than women in college classrooms, revealing how gender inequities regarding classroom participation still exist, according to a Dartmouth study. By comparison, women are more hesitant to speak and are more apt to use apologetic language. The findings are published in Gender & Society. (2021-01-18)

Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by 'prototypical' women
A new UW-led study reveals people's perceptions that sexual harassment primarily affects young, feminine and conventionally attractive women. Women who fall outside that prototype not only are perceived as unharmed by harassment, but also have a harder time convincing others that they have been harassed. (2021-01-14)

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