Current Gender Differences News and Events

Current Gender Differences News and Events, Gender Differences News Articles.
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Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues. (2021-01-13)

Texas A&M research explores how melanoma grows and spreads
The first step in treating cancer is understanding how it starts, grows and spreads throughout the body. A relatively new cancer research approach is the study of metabolites, the products of different steps in cancer cell metabolism, and how those substances interact. (2021-01-12)

Laypeople have difficulty estimating severity of blood loss
When an accident occurs, the reactions of bystanders are important. Researchers have studied whether laypeople realise the severity of the situation when someone in their proximity begins to bleed, and whether they can estimate how much the person is bleeding. The results show a discrepancy related to the victim's gender: for a woman losing blood, both blood loss and life-threatening injuries were underestimated. The study has been published in the scientific journal PLoS One. (2021-01-11)

Study pinpoints hurdles faced by women and minorities in U.S. chemistry departments
Insufficient interactions with academic advisors and peers and financial problems are derailing career aspirations of women and minority groups pursing graduate degrees in the nation's highest-funded chemistry programs, according to a newly published study. (2021-01-11)

An analysis of 145 journals suggests peer review itself may not explain gender discrepancies in publication rates
An analysis of 145 scholarly journals found that, among various factors that could contribute to gender bias and lesser representation of women in science, the peer review process itself is unlikely to be the primary cause of publishing inequalities. However, Flaminio Squazzoni and colleagues emphasize that the study does not account for many other factors. (2021-01-06)

Hotels that promote women perceived as fairer, less discriminatory
New research led by the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management suggests hotel companies that promote a woman over an equally qualified man are perceived as fairer and less discriminatory, creating a stronger organizational culture and higher financial performance. (2021-01-05)

Traditional stereotypes about masculinity may help explain support for Trump
American politicians have long been expected to uphold a certain veneer: powerful, influential and never vulnerable. New Penn State research has found that these idealized forms of masculinity may also help explain support for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election and in the days leading up to the 2020 election. (2021-01-04)

Countries led by women haven't fared significantly better in the COVID-19 pandemic
Countries led by women have not fared significantly better in the COVID-19 pandemic than those led by men- it may be just our Western media bias that makes us think they have! (2020-12-31)

Frailty is a factor in higher mortality for women awaiting liver transplants
Women awaiting liver transplants in the United States are known to be about one-third more likely than men to become too ill to undergo surgery or die before receiving a liver. Now a study headed by UC San Francisco and Columbia University highlights the role that frailty plays in this gender gap. (2020-12-30)

Astigmatism measures and corneal power obtained with different devices
The aim of the research is to compare the keratometric and total corneal astigmatism measures provided by three different technologies as well as to assess the level of interchangeability among them. (2020-12-22)

Community-based programs reduce sexual violence, study shows
Through small, neighborhood classes, researchers at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and Promundo-US significantly reduced sexual violence among teenage boys living in areas of concentrated disadvantage. The study appears in JAMA. (2020-12-22)

COVID-19 isolation hurting women more than men
A study by University of Calgary researchers with the Hotchkiss Brain Institute examining sex and gender differences on sleep, empathy and mood during months of isolation due to COVID-19 has found that women are suffering more than men with poorer sleep and more anxiety, depression and trauma, while also feeling more empathetic than men. (2020-12-22)

Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found. (2020-12-21)

Socioeconomic background linked to survival after having a cardiac arrest in hospital
Hospital in-patients from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are less likely to receive prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after their hearts stop beating and less likely to survive than patients from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. These are the findings of a new study in over 24,000 patients in Sweden, published in the European Heart Journal. (2020-12-20)

ACE2 protein protects against severe COVID-19: Study
Female COVID-19 patients face less severe disease complications and a lower risk of dying than male patients thanks to hormones and chromosomes that contribute to a stronger immune response, according to new research from a University of Alberta-led team. (2020-12-17)

In pandemic, people are turning to nature - especially women
One of the first studies on our relationship with nature during COVID finds significant increases in outdoor activity, especially among women. Women were 1.7 (gardening) to 2.9 (walking) times more likely to report increasing their activity compared to men. In general, outdoor activities seeing the largest increases were: watching wildlife, gardening, photos or art in nature, relaxing alone outside, and walking. (2020-12-16)

Discriminatory policies threaten care for transgender, gender diverse individuals
The Endocrine Society and the Pediatric Endocrine Society oppose legislative efforts to block transgender and gender diverse individuals from accessing gender-affirming medical and surgical care, the two medical societies said in a joint policy perspective published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-12-16)

Talking like a woman in TED Talks is associated with more popularity
Talking like a woman at online TED Talks is being ''uniquely rewarded'' with more views according to researchers, who say female language style is an ''underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence''. The researchers wanted to find out which was more predictive of TED Talk impact: a more instrumental and complex male-typical language style or a simpler and more personally engaging female-typical language style. (2020-12-16)

Female language style promotes visibility and influence online
A female-typical language style promotes the popularity of talks in the digital context and turns out to be an underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence. This was shown by UZH psychologists in an international study in which they analyzed 1,100 TED Talks. (2020-12-16)

Empowering women could help address climate change
Current and future damages of climate change depend greatly on the ability of affected populations to adapt to changing conditions. According to an international group of researchers, building capacity to adapt to such changes will require eradicating inequalities of many sorts, including gender. (2020-12-15)

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study
Women face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers. (2020-12-15)

Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers of Ehime University and the University of Helsinki measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea. The results showed that OHCs and gene expression profiles were individually grouped in three areas and the covariation of the two datasets provided by a multivariate method was significantly similar. This suggests that the gene expression profiles in salmon are affected by OHC contamination. (2020-12-15)

Proportionally more male bosses negative toward depression
A higher proportion of male than of female managers have negative attitudes toward depression, a University of Gothenburg study shows. The more senior the managerial positions, the bigger the share of men with negative attitudes; the same, moreover, applies to women in senior managerial jobs. (2020-12-14)

Study shows women less likely to survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than men
DALLAS - Dec. 15, 2020 - A study of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest shows that women have a lower likelihood of survival compared with men and are less likely to receive procedures commonly administered following cardiac arrest. (2020-12-14)

From the heart: study shows impact of social media appeals from COVID-19 frontliners
Anyone who's on social media right now has probably seen them: Passionate pleas from health care workers, asking for the public to realize how bad the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten, and urging them to take steps to slow the spread of coronavirus. But do these first-person posts from the heart actually have any effect? A new study of simulated posts by emergency physicians and government officials suggests so. (2020-12-10)

The gut microbiome in polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with metabolic traits
University of Tartu researchers and their collaborators from Finland and Spain investigated the relationship between the gut microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Their study revealed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome in their late reproductive years have significant microbial changes in gut-related to their metabolic health. (2020-12-08)

'Pink tax' hurts female consumers, but electing more women combats it
The wage gap between men and women is no secret, but another form of gender discrimination directly and disproportionately affects women worldwide: the ''pink tax'' imposed by import tariffs that target female products. (2020-12-08)

New research questions myth of the elderly widower: of course grandpa cook
The assumption that an elderly widower can hardly boil an egg simply doesn't stand according to a recent University of Copenhagen study. The study reports that male seniors do cook and only blossom in the kitchen once alone. Widows appear to be less interested in cooking. The new findings can be useful for municipal elder care and suggest that changing gender roles don't just apply to younger generations. (2020-12-07)

Career thoughts and parental relationships in adolescents with ADHD
A new study published in The Career Development Quarterly looked for potential links between negative or dysfunctional career thoughts and the quality of parental relationships in high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2020-12-07)

Football-loving states slow to enact youth concussion laws
States with college teams in strong conferences, in particular the Southeastern Conference (SEC), were among the last to take up regulations on youth concussions, according to a recent study. The study, which investigated the association between youth sport participation and passage of concussion legislation, also found a similar connection in states with high rates of high school football participation. In contrast, states with higher gender equality were early adopters. (2020-12-01)

ASM journals build mechanisms to promote gender equity
ASM journal editors and staff seek to improve gender equity after analysis shows that women are not only underrepresented but receive more negative outcomes. A new analysis of 80,000 manuscript submissions will guide new mechanisms to promote gender equity in the publishing process. (2020-12-01)

Study finds COVID-19 hindering US academic productivity of faculty with young children
The academic productivity of higher education faculty In the United States in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields with very young children suffered as a result of the stay-at-home orders during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the University of Michigan School of Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Link found between drought and HIV among women in less-developed countries
Lehigh University Professor Kelly Austin explores the consequences of drought and lack of environmental resources on women in less-developed countries. The research shows the direct and indirect associations to women's percentage of HIV. (2020-11-30)

High achievement cultures may kill students' interest in math -- especially for girls
In countries where academic performance in math is high, students paradoxically tend to have lower levels of interest in the subject. A recent study suggests that this effect is even stronger among girls, potentially explaining why they tend to do slightly less well at math than their male peers in high-achieving countries. (2020-11-25)

Better survival among women after lung cancer surgery
There are known differences in the survival rates of women and men with lung cancer. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden set out to investigate potential reasons behind this disparity, such as the presence of other underlying diseases and smoking status. The study, which was published in Chest, shows that women have better survival rates after lung cancer surgery than men, independent of other factors. (2020-11-23)

Sexual minorities, especially women, who misuse substances more likely to have psychiatric disorders
More than half of lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals who misuse alcohol or tobacco also have a co-occurring psychiatric disorder, compared to one-third of heterosexuals, a new University of Michigan study finds. (2020-11-20)

Can facial recognition help identify congenital adrenal hyperplasia?
Investigators train computers to recognize facial features, showing promise for identifying congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a rare hormone disorder. (2020-11-18)

A student's experience with math is affected by the composition of the group they are in
Weak students in high-performing math classes, especially boys, feel more shame compared to students in low-performing math classes. Stronger students, in turn, feel more bored and enjoy mathematics less in high-performing math classes, according to a new study. (2020-11-17)

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners. (2020-11-17)

Changes to the brain's reward system may drive overeating in mice
A combination of innate differences and diet-induced changes to the reward system may predispose some mice to overeat, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-16)

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