Current Gender Differences News and Events

Current Gender Differences News and Events, Gender Differences News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

Addressing the biological causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer
A new review published in Cancer Reports examines the biological differences in the development of prostate cancer across ethnicities. (2021-02-18)

Study finds no gender discrimination when leaders use confident language
People tend to listen to big talkers, whether they are women or men. Still, more women prefer not to use assertive language, according to a new study. Participants in an experiment more often followed advice of people using assertive ''cheap talk,'' statements that cannot be verified as true. (Example: ''I have extremely strong problem-solving skills.'') They followed advice regardless of advice giver's gender but thought others would be less likely to follow female leaders' advice. (2021-02-18)

Study finds risk factor for blood clots occurs in more than 10 percent of transgender men using testosterone
A potentially dangerous side effect of testosterone therapy for transgender men is an increase in red blood cells that can raise the risk of blood clots, heart attack or stroke, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-02-18)

How to improve gender equity in medicine
Gender equity and racial diversity in medicine can promote creative solutions to complex health problems and improve the delivery of high-quality care, argue authors in an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-16)

Predicting words' grammatical properties helps us read faster
Psycholinguists from the HSE Centre for Language and Brain found that when reading, people are not only able to predict specific words, but also words' grammatical properties, which helps them to read faster. Researchers have also discovered that predictability of words and grammatical features can be successfully modelled with the use of neural networks. The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-16)

Mental health disorders and alcohol misuse more common in LGB people
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB*) people are significantly more likely to have mental health conditions and report alcohol and drug misuse than heterosexual people - according to a new study led by UCL researchers in collaboration with the University of East Anglia and City, University of London. (2021-02-16)

Study finds gender disparities on National Institutes of Health study sections
Investigators at the University of Chicago Medicine have found that women are less likely to be represented as chairs and reviewers on study sections for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), based on data from one review cycle in 2019. (2021-02-15)

Which conspiracy theory do you believe in?
Everyone believes in at least one conspiracy theory, according to conspiracy researchers. Conspiracy theories aren't reserved for angry Republicans in the United States. Do you think Biden stole the election? (2021-02-11)

Diversity in policing can improve police-civilian interactions
Black and Hispanic officers make far fewer stops and arrests and use less force than white officers, especially against Black civilians, when facing otherwise common circumstances. Hispanic officers also engage in less enforcement activity. Female officers of all races also use less force than males. (2021-02-11)

Big data reveal threats to minorities policed by white and male officers
Using a dataset on daily patrols and enforcement activities of officers in the Chicago Police Department (CPD) - an agency that has undergone substantial diversification in recent decades - researchers report Black officers used force less often than white officers during the three-year period studied, and women used force less often than men. (2021-02-11)

Neandertal genes alter neurodevelopment in modern human brain organoids
Building modern human brain organoids with the Neanderthal variant of a gene has provided a glimpse into the way substitutions in this gene impacted our species' evolution. (2021-02-11)

The politics of synonyms
A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns. The results are available in the February issue of the journal PLOS. (2021-02-11)

Gender gap: Women represent two-thirds of doctorates, only one-third of academic jobs
Women today represent two-thirds of all Canadian doctorates in archaeology, but only one-third of Canadian tenure-stream faculty. While men with Canadian PhDs have done well in securing tenure-track jobs in Canada over the past 15 years, women have not, according to a new study from McGill University. The current COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate these existing inequalities. (2021-02-11)

Want to hire more women? Expand your short list
As more male-dominated industries look for ways to hire women, new Cornell University research offers employers a simple solution -- make your initial job candidate short list longer. (2021-02-11)

'Left behind' adolescent women must be prioritised within sustainable development agenda
The needs of millions of overlooked, 'left behind' adolescent women must become a more significant priority within international efforts to end poverty by 2030, a UK Government-commissioned report is urging. (2021-02-10)

Vaccine confidence grows under new administration, latest CUNY SPH Survey reveals
Under the Biden Administration, New Yorkers' acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased significantly. In September, 55% of residents reported they would take the vaccine when it became available and this January, 64% reported they would take it. (2021-02-09)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

Electronic health records can be valuable predictor of those likeliest to die from COVID
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital identifies key predictors of COVID-19 mortality among different age groups from patient longitudinal medical records. Predictive analytics based on electronic health records could prove valuable in allocating and distributing limited resources in the time of a pandemic. (2021-02-04)

Study reveals gender imbalance in scholarly submissions during pandemic
A study conducted by Michelle Bell, Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale School of the Environment (YSE), and postdoctoral associate Kelvin C. Fong found the rate of manuscript submission to a major peer-reviewed journal (American Journal of Public Health) were higher during the pandemic -- but also revealed a concerning imbalance in submissions by gender. (2021-02-03)

Scientists believe studies by colleagues are more prone to biases than their own studies
The properties of human mind affect the quality of scientific knowledge through the insertion of unconscious cognitive biases. Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that the current level of awareness about research biases is generally low among ecology scientists. Underestimation of the risks associated with unconscious cognitive biases prevents avoiding these risks in a scientist's own research. Due to unconscious origin of biases, it is impossible to combat them without external intervention. (2021-02-03)

Lesbian, gay, bisexual medical students are more likely to experience burnout, study finds
Burnout among medical students has significant implications for student health and delivery of care, and future physicians in sexual minority groups report higher rates of burnout than their heterosexual peers. (2021-02-02)

Addressing power differences may spur advantaged racial groups to act for racial equality
When different groups of people come into contact, what's the key to motivating advantaged racial groups to join historically disadvantaged racial minority groups to strive for racial equality and social justice? It's a complex conundrum studied for years by social scientists like Linda Tropp, professor of social psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (2021-02-02)

Americans like sports, but heterosexual men especially do
Nearly nine out of 10 Americans say they enjoy sports at least a little, but heterosexual men more commonly identify as passionate sports fans, a new study suggests. A survey of nearly 4,000 American adults found that only 11% said they did not identify as sports fans at all. Over 40% were passionate fans, identifying themselves as being ''quite a bit'' or ''very much so'' sports fans. (2021-01-29)

Gender and spatial behavior
Research based on the daily movements of people living in a contemporary hunter-gatherer society provides new evidence for links between the gendered division of labor in human societies over the past 2.5 million years and differences in the way men and women think about space. (2021-01-28)

Risk-taking linked to particular brain features
There is a common genetic and neurobiological basis for risky behavior - the genetic disposition for risk-taking is mapped in several areas of the brain, a UZH study shows. The study combines genetic information and brain scans from more than 25,000 people for the first time. (2021-01-28)

'Be a man': Why some men respond aggressively to threats to manhood
When their manhood is threatened, some men respond more aggressively than others. New research from Duke University suggests who may be most triggered by such threats - younger men whose sense of masculinity depends heavily on other people's opinions. ''The more social pressure a man feels to be masculine, the more aggressive he may be,'' said Adam Stanaland, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology and public policy at Duke and the study's lead author. (2021-01-28)

World's largest opinion survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action
An innovative UNDP global survey conducted in collaboration with Oxford University experts -- the largest-ever opinion survey on climate change (1.2 million people in 50 countries) -- finds 64% (+/- 2%) deem climate an 'emergency.' Worldwide, most people clearly want a strong and wide-ranging policy response, and 4 of 18 policy options received majority support. Distributed across mobile gaming networks the survey drew 550,000 hard-to-reach youth respondents (14-18 years old) (2021-01-27)

For veterans after suicide attempts, gender affects recovery needs
What care do veterans need when recovering after suicide attempts? The answer may be different for women compared to men veterans, reports a qualitative study in Medical Care, part of a special issue devoted to new research on suicide risk and prevention in women. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-25)

Survey: barriers, not demographics, affect willingness to pursue veterinary care
When it comes to seeking veterinary care for dogs, barriers to access - including a lack of trust - have more effect on the decision-making process than differences in race, gender or socioeconomic status. (2021-01-25)

In ED patients with chest and abdominal pain, care delivered by physicians and APPs is si
In patients matched on complexity and acuity presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and abdominal pain, the care delivered by advanced practice providers (APPs) and emergency physicians is largely similar with respect to diagnostic test ordering and admission decisions. (2021-01-25)

Sliding life expectancy poses gender and inequity questions
Life expectancy gain is slowing in Australia - and figures show these figures are already sliding backwards in both the US and UK - yet little is being done by policy makers to understand specific gender and inequity reasons why this slip is occurring. (2021-01-22)

Research shows preference for male children is declining in Bangladesh
Research from the University of Kent has demonstrated a decline in 'son preference' by women of childbearing age in Bangladesh. However, the study also shows that fertility decisions are still influenced according to son preference. (2021-01-22)

How clicks on a job platform can reveal bias
Scientists at ETH Zurich have leveraged big data from recruitment platforms and machine learning to study hiring discrimination. They show that discrimination against immigrants depends, among other things, on the time of day; and that both men and women face discrimination. (2021-01-21)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers. (2021-01-19)

College classrooms are still chilly for women, as men speak more
Men speak 1.6 times more often than women in college classrooms, revealing how gender inequities regarding classroom participation still exist, according to a Dartmouth study. By comparison, women are more hesitant to speak and are more apt to use apologetic language. The findings are published in Gender & Society. (2021-01-18)

World's first test to accurately predict depression and bipolar disorder
University of South Australia scientists have developed the world's first test to accurately predict mood disorders in people, based on the levels of a specific protein found in the brain. (2021-01-18)

Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues. (2021-01-13)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.