Current Gene Activity News and Events

Current Gene Activity News and Events, Gene Activity News Articles.
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New drug combination shows promise as powerful treatment for AML
Scientists have identified two drugs that are potent against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone. The researchers were able to significantly enhance cancer cell death by jointly administering the drugs that are only partially effective when used as single-agent therapies. (2021-01-19)

Gene-editing 'scissor' tool may also be a 'dimmer switch'
In a series of experiments with laboratory-cultured bacteria, Johns Hopkins scientists have found evidence that there is a second role for the widely used gene-cutting system CRISPR-Cas9 -- as a genetic dimmer switch for CRISPR-Cas9 genes (2021-01-19)

Genome editing to treat human retinal degeneration
Gene editing therapies, including CRISPR-Cas systems, offer the potential to correct mutations causing inherited retinal degenerations, a leading cause of blindness. Technological advances in gene editing, continuing safety concerns, and strategies to overcome these challenges (2021-01-19)

COVID-19 has multiple faces
Scientists from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn have found that COVID-19 comprises at least five different variants. These differ in how the immune system responds to the infection. (2021-01-18)

Biodistribution of AAV gene transfer vectors in nonhuman primate
The biodistribution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vectors can be measured in nonhuman primates using a new method. The method quantifies whole-body and organ-specific AAV capsids from 1 to 72 hours after administration (2021-01-15)

Sperm-specific gene expression in organisms including mice, macaques and men
A large class of mammalian genes is not completely shared throughout sperm development and differentiation, according to a new study of sperm in organisms including mice, macaques and men. (2021-01-14)

Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics. (2021-01-12)

Biomarkers in fathers' sperm linked to offspring autism
Epigenetic biomarkers in human sperm have been identified that can indicate a propensity to father children with autism spectrum disorder. In the study, researchers identified a set of genomic features, called DNA methylation regions, in sperm samples from men who were known to have autistic children. Then in a set of blind tests, they were able to use the presence of these features to determine whether other men had fathered autistic children with 90% accuracy. (2021-01-11)

Study shows meaningful lockdown activity is more satisfying than busyness
With much of the world practicing varying degrees of social distancing and lockdown, researchers have been investigating the key to happiness in isolation. (2021-01-11)

How the circadian clock regulates liver genes in time and space
EPFL scientists have carried out the first comprehensive study of how genes in the liver perform their metabolic functions in both space and time of day. Monitoring almost 5000 genes at the level of the individual cell across a 24-hour period, the researchers have modelled how the circadian clock and liver functions crosstalk throughout the day in sync with the feeding-fasting cycle. (2021-01-11)

Study: New insights on the role of the MLL4 gene in Kabuki syndrome
Research suggests that MLL4 controls the production of neurons that secrete growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. (2021-01-11)

Response to infection therapy better understood thanks to a new technique
A sequencing-based solution can be utilised to determine infection clearance and microbiota recovery. Next, the researchers will apply the technique to investigate the coronavirus disease. (2021-01-07)

New evidence: Effects of Huntington's disease mutation may begin in childhood
Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that there is a neurodevelopmental component to late-onset neurodegeneration occurring in the brain of huntingtin gene (HTT) mutation carriers, and this increased susceptibility to brain cell death begins during childhood. Experts discuss evidence that the HTT gene mutation affects brain and body growth based on a unique study of children at risk for HD, the Kids-HD study, in a review paper and research article published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease. (2021-01-06)

New clues why gold standard treatment for bipolar disorder doesn't work for majority of patients
Lithium is considered the gold standard for treating bipolar disorder (BD), but nearly 70 percent of people with BD don't respond to it. This leaves them at risk for debilitating, potentially life-threatening mood swings. Researchers at the Salk Institute have found that the culprit may lie in gene activity--or lack of it. (2021-01-05)

Integrator: A guardian of the human transcriptome
In a joint collaboration, Danish and German researchers have characterized a cellular activity that protects our cells from potentially toxic by-products of gene expression. This activity is central for the ability of multicellular organisms to uphold a robust evolutionary 'reservoir' of gene products. (2021-01-05)

$3.9M project on self-deleting genes takes aim at mosquito-borne diseases
To control mosquito populations and prevent them from transmitting diseases such as malaria, many researchers are pursuing strategies in mosquito genetic engineering. A new Texas A&M AgriLife Research project aims to enable temporary ''test runs'' of proposed genetic changes in mosquitoes, after which the changes remove themselves from the mosquitoes' genetic code. (2020-12-28)

Regulatory RNAs promote breast cancer metastasis
A gene-regulating snippet of RNA may contribute to the spread of many breast cancers. A molecule designed to destroy that RNA prevented metastases in animal models. The same strategy could be used to develop a new breast cancer drug. (2020-12-22)

How roundworms decide the time is right
The roundworm C. elegans matches its development to the amount of food in its environment. It uses a protein called BLMP-1 to open up a large set of developmental genes, priming them to turn on when food is plentiful. Humans have a protein with a similar function that is known to be overactive in some blood cancers. (2020-12-22)

Brain gene expression patterns predict behavior of individual honey bees
An unusual study that involved bar coding and tracking the behavior of thousands of individual honey bees in six queenless bee hives and analyzing gene expression in their brains offers new insights into how gene regulation contributes to social behavior. (2020-12-22)

Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found. (2020-12-21)

Digging deep for differences in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
A UT Southwestern research team has catalogued gene activity in the skeletal muscle of mice, comparing healthy animals to those carrying a genetic mutation that causes Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans. The findings, published online recently in PNAS, could lead to new treatments for this devastating degenerative disease and insights into factors that affect muscle development. (2020-12-21)

Medical oddity reveals unheard-of 'immunity gene' mutations and new way to screen them
Researchers baffled by an infant's rare encephalitis case unusual in children found unheard-of mutations and a new way to examine the 'immunity gene.' (2020-12-20)

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria. (2020-12-17)

The DNA regions in our brain that contribute to make us human
With only 1% difference, the human and chimpanzee protein-coding genomes are remarkably similar. Understanding the biological features that make us human is part of a fascinating and intensely debated line of research. Researchers at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne have developed a new approach to pinpoint, for the first time, adaptive human-specific changes in the way genes are regulated in the brain. (2020-12-16)

New insights into Fragile X syndrome and the fetal brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have revealed further insight into the fetal development of our brain and the potential causes of Fragile X syndrome (FSX). (2020-12-16)

Clemson researcher identifies gene teams working in subregions of brain
You must first understand how something works normally before you can figure out why it's broken. Clemson University researcher Yuqing ''Iris'' Hang has identified six mini gene co-expression networks for a normally functioning brain. That will allow researchers to test each of the gene teams to see if gene pairs are changing in brain tumors or people with intellectual disabilities. (2020-12-16)

Cancer researchers identify potential new class of drugs to treat blood and bone marrow cancers
CLEVELAND - A new study by researchers in Cleveland Clinic's Taussig Cancer Institute and Lerner Research Institute describes a novel class of targeted cancer drugs that may prove effective in treating certain common types of leukemia. The results first appeared online in Blood Cancer Discovery. (2020-12-15)

Gene therapy for placental insufficiency moves toward the clinic
A new study identified an adenovirus gene therapy vector carrying a VEGF isoform. It can improve uterine blood flow in placental insufficiency. (2020-12-15)

Scientists found out genes involved in a compound in lichens with antiviral activity
Lichens are of great importance both ecologically and as a biological model. These organisms produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, including usnic acid, a compound with unknown biological function but which in-vitro studies have found to present antiviral, neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity. An international research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has identified the cluster of biosynthetic genes involved in the production of this compound. (2020-12-11)

Muscle cell secrets
A muscle fiber consists of just one cell, but many nuclei. A team at the MDC led by Professor Carmen Birchmeier has now shown just how varied these nuclei are. The study, which has been published in Nature Communications, can help us better understand muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (2020-12-11)

Using CRISPR, new technique makes it easy to map genetic networks
UC Berkeley scientists has developed an easy way to genetically profile a cell, including human cells, and rapidly determine all DNA sequences in the genome that regulate expression of a specific gene. This can help track down upstream genes that regulate disease genes, and potentially find new drug targets. The technique involves CRISPRing the entire genome while giving each CRISPR guide RNA a unique barcode. Deep sequencing of pooled cells uniquely identifies control genes. (2020-12-10)

AAV capsid-promoter interactions in the non-human primate brain
The phenomenon of AAV capsid-promoter interaction recently seen in the rat central nervous system has now been shown to occur in the non-human primate brain. This interaction can directly determine cell-specific transgene expression (2020-12-10)

Uniquely human gene may drive numerous cancers
A new study published in FASEB BioAdvances reveals a human-specific connection between advanced carcinomas and a gene called SIGLEC12. (2020-12-09)

Single-eye gene therapy improves vision in both eyes of patients with inherited eye disorder
A gene therapy for an inherited eye disorder can ameliorate vision loss in both eyes despite only being injected into one, according to a phase 3 clinical trial involving 37 patients. (2020-12-09)

Memory deficits resulting from epigenetic changes in Alzheimer's disease can be reversed
Memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be able to be restored by inhibiting certain enzymes involved in abnormal gene transcription, according to a preclinical study by researchers at the University at Buffalo. (2020-12-09)

Researchers discover key driver of the spread of cancer to the brain
Approximately 200,000 cancer patients are diagnosed with brain metastases each year, yet few treatment options exist because the mechanisms that allow cancer to spread to the brain remain unclear. However, a study recently published in the journal Cancer Cell by VCU Massey Cancer Center scientist Suyun Huang, M.D., Ph.D., offers hope for the development of future therapies by showing how a poorly understood gene known as YTHDF3 plays a significant role in the process. (2020-12-08)

Researchers use genomics to identify diabetic retinopathy factors
In the paper, ''Integration of genomics and transcriptomics predicts diabetic retinopathy susceptibility genes,'' published in eLife, researchers identified genes that respond differently in response to high glucose in individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy. (2020-12-07)

How the brain distinguishes fact from possibility
Processing certain factual information elicits stronger brain activity than uncertain information, according to research recently published in eNeuro. (2020-12-07)

Study finds large-scale expansion of stem rust resistance gene in barley and oat lineages
Stem rust is one of the most devastating fungal diseases of wheat and historically has caused dramatic, widespread crop failures resulting in significant yield losses around the world. Stem rust epidemics in major wheat growing areas could cause a major threat to global food security. Scientists have identified a resistance gene, Sr22, as one of the few characterized genes that protects against a large array of stem rust races. (2020-12-07)

'Off switch' during error-prone cell cycle phase may fix CRISPR's unwanted changes problem
Turning off gene-editing until it reaches cell cycle phases where more accurate repairs are likely to happen offers a promising fix to CRISPR-Cas9's problem with unwanted genetic changes. (2020-12-04)

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