Current Gene Mutation News and Events | Page 25

Current Gene Mutation News and Events, Gene Mutation News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Natural gene therapy for intractable skin disease discovered
Pathogenic gene mutations causing a type of intractable skin disease can be eliminated from some parts of patients' skin as they age, according to Hokkaido University researchers and their collaborators in Japan. This represents a form of natural gene therapy. (2019-04-01)

A bald gene find­ing
Hairlessness in dogs can be the result of deliberate breeding or, in certain breeds, a defect. A recent study completed at the University of Helsinki describes a gene variant in the SGK3 gene, which causes hairlessness in Scottish deerhounds. The gene defect results in puppies born with thin fur that lose all of their hair in a few weeks. SGK3 is also a candidate for association with non-hormonal baldness in humans. (2019-04-01)

The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. Now, an international collaborative work involving Department of Molecular Evolution and Development of University of Vienna, Zhejiang University of China, and Swedish Museum of Natural History analyzed all together 11 songbird species genomes, including those of five bird-of-paradise species, and reconstructed the evolutionary history of their sex chromosomes. (2019-04-01)

Researchers discover two, rare genes associated with Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have identified two, extremely rare genetic variants linked to Alzheimer disease (AD) for the first time. These variants, one located in the NOTCH3 gene and the other in the TREM2 gene, were observed in persons with AD but not in any of the controls. (2019-03-29)

Two new genes discovered in the developmental defects of canine enamel
In addition to humans, hereditary disorders of enamel development occur in dogs, greatly impacting their dental health and wellbeing. A recent study reveals canine enamel disorders similar to those found in humans, linking them with ENAM and ACP4, two genes previously described in humans. (2019-03-29)

McSteen lab finds a new gene essential for making ears of corn
The new research, which appears in the journal Molecular Plant, extends the growing biological understanding of how different parts of corn plants develop, which is important information for a crop that is a mainstay of the global food supply. (2019-03-29)

CNIO researchers identify a new gene involved in the development of a rare endocrine tumour
Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumours and also the most hereditary form of all types of cancer. Researchers have for the first time linked mutations in the DLST gene with the development of such tumors. In addition to the importance of this finding for the future therapies, the discovery can broaden the number of families that may benefit from genetic counselling for prevention, detection and monitoring of these cancers. (2019-03-28)

New study confirms EpCAM as promising target for cancer immunotherapy
Researchers have shown that cancer immunotherapy targeting the tumor biomarker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is safe and nontoxic in mice and can significantly delay tumor formation and growth. (2019-03-28)

New muscular disease: Myoglobinopathy
Institute (IDIBELL) led by Dr. Montse Olivé have described in Nature Communications a new muscular disease caused by a mutation in the myoglobin gene. The study has been possible thanks to a collaboration with a group of geneticists from the University of Western Australia (UWA), led by Prof. Nigel Laing, and researchers from the Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden). (2019-03-27)

Woman with novel gene mutation lives almost pain-free
A woman in Scotland can feel virtually no pain due to a mutation in a previously-unidentified gene, according to a research paper co-led by UCL. She also experiences very little anxiety and fear, and may have enhanced wound healing due to the mutation, which the researchers say could help guide new treatments for a range of conditions, they report in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. (2019-03-27)

NUP160 genetic mutation linked to steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome
Mutations in the NUP160 gene, which encodes one protein component of the nuclear pore complex nucleoporin 160 kD, are implicated in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, an international team reports March 25, 2019, in JASN. (2019-03-26)

Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant
An international research team led by researchers from the University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology (both Germany) have found why the giant duckweed has a low genetic diversity despite its large population size: low mutation rates contribute to low genetic diversity. The results are relevant for future studies on the evolution of plants and will accelerate the use of duckweeds both for basic research and industrial applications. The study was published in ''Nature Communications''. (2019-03-26)

New gene potentially involved in metastasis identified
Cancers that display a specific combination of sugars, called T-antigen, are more likely to spread through the body and kill a patient. However, what regulates the appearance of T-antigen in cancer cells, the set of proteins modified with T-antigen, and the roles the T-antigen and the modified proteins play during metastasis, is not yet understood. (2019-03-26)

Infertility's roots in DNA packaging
Japanese researchers find one cause of infertility is the incomplete development of the proteins packaging DNA in sperm cells. (2019-03-26)

Understanding gene interactions holds key to personalized medicine, scientists say
Scientists outline a new framework for studying gene function -- not in isolation, gene by gene, but as a network, to understand how multiple genes and genetic background influence trait inheritance. (2019-03-25)

Researchers reveal new molecular mechanism involved in pancreas repair
Ramón Muñoz-Chápuli and Rita Carmona, researchers of the UMA Department of Animal Biology, have identified a new molecular mechanism involved in pancreas repair. These experts have demonstrated that Wt1 gene deletion causes deterioration of pancreas. A mouse study has evidenced that, a few days after silencing this gene, pancreatic tissue deteriorates, acini -producers of pancreatic enzymes- losses adhesion and, also, a severe edema occurs. (2019-03-25)

New CRISPR-powered device detects genetic mutations in minutes
A team of engineers combined CRISPR with electronic transistors made from graphene to create a new hand-held device that can detect specific genetic mutations in a matter of minutes. The device, dubbed CRISPR-Chip, could be used to rapidly diagnose genetic diseases or to evaluate the accuracy of gene-editing techniques. The team used the device to identify genetic mutations in DNA samples from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. (2019-03-25)

Like mountaineers, nerves need expert guidance to find their way
Similar to the dozens of Sherpas that guide hikers up treacherous Himalayan mountains to reach a summit, the nervous system relies on elaborate timing and location of guidance cues for neuronal axons--threadlike projections--to successfully reach their destinations in the body. Now, Salk Institute researchers discover how neurons navigate a tricky cellular environment by listening for directions, while simultaneously filtering out inappropriate instructions to avoid getting lost. (2019-03-22)

The evolution of brain tumors
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center found in a recent study that only three different genetic alterations drive the early development of malignant glioblastomas. At least one of these three cancer drivers was present in all tumors investigated. The tumors develop for up to seven years before they become noticeable as symptoms and are diagnosed. However, in contrast to their early development, glioblastomas, which return after therapy, share no concurrent genetic alterations. (2019-03-21)

Study points to new strategy for boosting immunotherapy effectiveness in advanced colorectal cancer
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed the common oncogene KRAS as a possible explanation for why many patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) do not respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy. (2019-03-21)

New study shows effects on offspring of epigenetic inheritance via sperm
As an organism grows and responds to its environment, genes in its cells are constantly turning on and off, with different patterns of gene expression in different cells. But can changes in gene expression be passed on from parents to their children and subsequent generations? Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now demonstrated that epigenetic information carried by parental sperm chromosomes can cause changes in gene expression and development in the offspring. (2019-03-20)

Researchers identify gene variant associated with cellular aging
It is well known that psychiatric stress is associated with accelerated aging. Now, a new study shows that a gene mutation interacts with multiple types of psychiatric stress including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain and sleep disturbances in association with cellular aging. (2019-03-20)

Undernutrition during pregnancy changes lung-specific gene expression
Higher rates of lung disease in children born to moms who were undernourished during pregnancy could be explained by epigenetic changes in a number of lung-specific genes. (2019-03-19)

How hot spots of genetic variation evolved in human DNA
New research investigates hot spots of genetic variation within the human genome, examining the sections of our DNA that are most likely to differ significantly from one person to another. (2019-03-19)

Precision oncology insights revealed for colorectal cancer
Findings published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology could help define strategies to more effectively treat colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. (2019-03-19)

Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis
To identify genes involved in photosynthesis, researchers built a library containing thousands of single-celled algae, each with a different gene mutation. The library, which took nine years to construct, has already helped researchers identify 303 genes associated with photosynthesis including 21 newly discovered genes with high potential to provide new insights into this life-sustaining process. (2019-03-18)

Potential cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein
An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing or dysfunctional in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research from the University of Illinois and the University of Iowa. (2019-03-13)

Scientists find new approach that shows promise for treating cystic fibrosis
Researchers say a widely-used antifungal drug may hold promise for treating people with cystic fibrosis, a life-threatening genetic disorder that causes serious damage to the lungs. In studies using human cells and animals models, the researchers found that the medication, called amphotericin, helps lung cells function in a way that could make it easier for patients to fight chronic bacterial lung infections that are a hallmark of the disease. (2019-03-13)

Gene behind long-recognized mitochondrial disease has highly varied effects
Mutations in the mitochondrial gene mt-ATP6, which encodes an essential part of the mitochondrial motor known as ATP synthase that generates cellular energy, are much more variable than previously thought. This prompts the need to develop more precise clinical tests that can better determine the course of treatment for patients affected by mitochondrial disorder. (2019-03-12)

Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection
Researchers at Osaka University applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong selective constraints on the gene cbpJ, suggesting its importance for bacterial infection. Further analyses revealed its role in bacterial evasion of host neutrophils, suggesting CbpJ's value as a target for drugs against streptococci. (2019-03-11)

Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity
A new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution led by scientists from the University of Chicago challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve. (2019-03-11)

Number and timing of pregnancies influence breast cancer risk for women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation
Researchers confirm the lower risk of breast cancer from multiple pregnancies and from breast feeding seen in average risk women extends to those at the highest risk of breast cancer, according to the largest prospective study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers to date. Women with BRCA1 mutations who had two, three or four or more full-term pregnancies were at 21 percent, 30 percent, and 50 percent decrease risk of breast cancer compared to women with a single full-term pregnancy. (2019-03-08)

SHANK3: the good, the bad and the hopeful
New approach brings a better understanding of Phelan-McDermid syndrome and SHANK3. (2019-03-07)

The evolution of grain yield
A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor which determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently little was known about its genetic basis. Whilst investigating floret fertility, a group of researchers from Japan, Germany and Israel have now discovered the locus Grain Number Increase 1 (GNI1), an important contributor to floret fertility. (2019-03-06)

Scientists find method to boost CRISPR efficiency
Scientists have developed a method to boost the efficiency of CRISPR gene editing in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to a study that could have implications for optimizing gene therapies for other diseases. (2019-03-06)

Long-lived parents produce better quality offspring
New research shows that long-lived parents produce better quality offspring. Researchers studied a gene associated with ageing in roundworms. They found that by reducing this gene's expression, they could not only more than double the worm's lifespan - but also improve the fitness of its offspring. The findings support an emerging new theory that we have genes that age us, and that shutting down these genes in later life could one day help us stay younger and healthier for longer. (2019-03-04)

Promising strategy to fight the most deadly brain tumor in children
A study published in Nature Communications found that an inhibitor of an enzyme called ACVR1 slows tumor growth and increases survival in an animal model of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) -- the most deadly brain tumor in children. (2019-03-04)

Discovery of the genetic 'conductor' of brain stem cells
Our brain comprises 85 billion nerve cells and just as many so-called glial cells. But what decides when and how many of them become neurons or glial cells? A new study has shown how the Foxg1 gene plays a fundamental role in piloting the differentiation of stem cells, guaranteeing that neurons and glial cells are produced in the right quantity and at the right moment. The research opens new roads to understanding and treating incurable genetic diseases. (2019-03-04)

Potential treatment strategy uncovered for pancreatic cancer
Published in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and other collaborating institutions report promising results from early laboratory studies of a treatment strategy that forces pancreatic cancer to rely on a type of energy production called autophagy, also known as 'self-eating,' in which cells recycle their own parts for energy. (2019-03-04)

Checking DNA base editor's mistakes and tricks to reduce them
IBS scientists have identified the mistake-rate of DNA editing tools, based on CRISPR and known as adenine base editors. Assessing the genome-wide target specificity of these innovative techniques is essential to harness their applications in clinics and biotechnology. (2019-03-04)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.