Current Gene Regulation News and Events

Current Gene Regulation News and Events, Gene Regulation News Articles.
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Basic cell health systems wear down in Huntington's disease, novel analysis shows
A new computational approach for analyzing complex datasets shows that as disease progresses, neurons and astrocytes lose the ability to maintain homeostasis. The ''Geomic'' approach can be applied to other diseases, authors say. (2021-02-23)

New features of a gene defect that affects muzzle length and caudal vertebrae in dogs
A recent genetic study at the University of Helsinki provides new information on the occurrence of a DVL2 gene defect associated with a screw tail and its relevance to canine constitution and health. The variant was found in several Bulldog and Pit Bull type breeds, and it was shown to result in caudal vertebral anomalies and shortening of the muzzle. The DLV2 variant may also affect the development of the heart. (2021-02-23)

New therapeutic target for Huntington's treatment
Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation in the Huntingtin gene (HTT), which appears in adults and features motor, cognitive and psychiatric alterations. The origin of this disease has been associated with the anomalous functioning of the mutated protein: mHTT, but recent data showed the involvement of other molecular mechanisms. (2021-02-23)

UIC researchers invent new gene-editing tool
Researchers have discovered a new gene-editing technique that allows for the programming of sequential cuts -- or edits -- over time. (2021-02-23)

A research team identifies a metabolic footprint associated with the perception of satiety
The study was carried out in 140 volunteers suffering from overweight and obesity, and has showed that higher concentrations of glycine and linoleic acid are associated with a greater sensation of satiety, while saccharose and some sphingomyelins are negatively associated (that is to say, with a lower perception of satiety). Although metabolomics has been widely used in nutritional research, this is the first time it has been used to study the perception of satiety (2021-02-22)

A sleep disorder associated with shift work may affect gene function
Going on holiday can affect shift workers on the level of gene function: a new study indicates that resting during a holiday period restored functions associated with DNA regulation in shift workers suffering from sleep deprivation. (2021-02-22)

A novel gene discovery associated with a development disorder of pituitary origin
A study carried out at the University of Helsinki investigated pituitary dwarfism in Karelian Bear Dogs and found a link to a variant of the POU1F1 gene. The results can also help understand the gene's significance to the human pituitary gland's development and function. (2021-02-22)

How a gene called HAND2 may impact the timing of labor
Using new and existing datasets the team studied genes that were active in the uterine linings of different animals while pregnant or carrying eggs. Scientists also investigated the changing levels of HAND2 during gestation. (2021-02-22)

Tweaking corn kernels with CRISPR
Corn has a highly complex genome, making it a challenge to apply genome-editing techniques to it. CSHL Professor David Jackson and postdoctoral fellow Lei Liu used CRISPR to tinker with the corn genome promoter regions and modify stem cell growth. They figured out which sections influence kernel yield, and they hope to make targeted genome-editing in corn more precise and efficient. (2021-02-22)

Air pollution puts children at higher risk of disease in adulthood
First of its kind study reveals evidence that early exposure to dirty air alters genes in a way that could lead to adult heart disease, among other ailments. The findings could change the way medical experts and parents think about the air children breathe and inform clinical interventions. (2021-02-22)

Sex that is not for reproduction
Conjugation (or mating) of ciliates is a unique phenomenon among living beings. They have sex not for reproduction or pleasure - they seek to increase genetic variation. Scientists from St Petersburg University, together with colleagues from Poland and France, have studied the mating process in five sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. Their findings enabled them to describe genetic mechanisms behind this phenomenon. (2021-02-19)

Heartbeat secrets unlocked as cardiac rhythm gene role identified
Researchers have used the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to identify the role of a gene involved in cardiac rhythm, which could help explain the fundamentals of what it takes to make a human heartbeat. (2021-02-15)

Wake-up call for neural stem cells
A brain enzyme activates dormant neural stem cells, revealing how defects in its gene could lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. (2021-02-11)

Neandertal genes alter neurodevelopment in modern human brain organoids
Building modern human brain organoids with the Neanderthal variant of a gene has provided a glimpse into the way substitutions in this gene impacted our species' evolution. (2021-02-11)

Anti-cancer drug's mode of operation deciphered
Freiburg researchers show how the membrane protein CD20 keeps the immune system's antibody-producing cells in check. (2021-02-10)

CWRU researchers uncover biochemical rules between RNA-protein interactions and expr
A team of Case Western Reserve University researchers has found a way to measure key characteristics of proteins that bind to RNA in cells--a discovery that could improve our understanding of how gene function is disturbed in cancer, neurodegenerative disorders or infections. (2021-02-10)

New targets for the development of a drug treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes
The GIP receptor in the central nervous system plays a crucial role in the regulation of body weight and food intake. This is shown by a recent study by Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen, ETH Zurich and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD). The study, which has now been published in 'Cell Metabolism', identifies new targets for the development of a drug treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes. (2021-02-10)

Known tumour suppressor gene found essential for development, regeneration&stress-response
- Experiments carried out in the Drosophila fly have led to the identification of the headcase (hdc) gene as pivotal for adult progenitor cells, allowing them to undergo metamorphosis and give rise to adult tissue structures. - The study by IRB Barcelona's Development and Morphogenesis in Drosophila lab has been published in PLOS Genetics. (2021-02-09)

Sonoporation: Underlying mechanisms and applications in cellular regulation
Sonoporation: Underlying Mechanisms and Applications in Cellular Regulation https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0028 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Yue Li, Zhiyi Chen and Shuping Ge from First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang, China and Tower Health and Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA summarize current state of the art applications of microbubble-cell interactions and sonoporation effects to cellular functions. (2021-02-09)

Not a living fossil: How the Coelacanth recently evolved dozens of new genes
The research shows the dramatic effect traveling DNA can have on the creation of genes and provide a glimpse into some of the forces that shaped the genome of one of the most ancient and mysterious organisms. (2021-02-09)

Winner-takes-all synthetic gene circuit process opens new pathways to disease treatment
Multicellular synthetic circuits will be a much more effective way to treat cancer. (2021-02-08)

Synthetic protein quality control system in bacteria
Synthetic protein quality control system in bacteria. (2021-02-08)

Type 2 diabetes: drugs initially increase glucose production
Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown. A study shows that there is a direct correlation between the elimination of glucose via the kidneys and new glucose production in the liver. (2021-02-08)

Identification of three genes that determine the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells
Tissue stem cells can self-renew and differentiate, supplying cells necessary for tissues at various developmental stages. However, detailed analysis in vivo is difficult, so the molecular mechanisms underlying the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells have remained a mystery. Here, by using organoids that mimic tissue structure and function in vivo and GeCKO screening to inactivate arbitrary genes, Alk, Bclaf3 and Prkra have been identified as genes regulating stemness. (2021-02-08)

The genetic susceptibility of people with Down's syndrome to COVID-19
A study reveals the genetic factors that may expose or protect people with Down syndrome from SARS-CoV-2. TMPRSS2, a gene that codes for an enzyme critical for aiding the entry of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells, had 60% higher levels of expression in Down syndrome. The researchers also found higher expression levels for CXCL10, a gene that can trigger cytokine storms. The authors call to vaccinate people with Down syndrome against COVID-19 as a priority. (2021-02-08)

AI researchers ask: What's going on inside the black box?
Brain-like artificial networks are often referred to as a ''black box'' because researchers do not know how they learn and make predictions. Researchers at CSHL reported a way to peek inside the box and identify key features on which the computer relies, particularly when trying to identify complex DNA sequences. (2021-02-08)

Distinctness of mental disorders traced to differences in gene readouts
A new study suggests that differences in the expression of gene transcripts - readouts copied from DNA that help maintain and build our cells - may hold the key to understanding how mental disorders with shared genetic risk factors result in different patterns of onset, symptoms, course of illness, and treatment responses. Findings from the study, conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health, part of NIH, appear in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. (2021-02-08)

At the core of the Integrator complex
A new paper from the Galej group at EMBL Grenoble describes the structure of key parts of the Integrator complex. This complex, which is composed of multiple protein subunits, is involved in global regulation of the process of transcription, during which the cell's DNA is used as a template to make instructions in the form of RNA. Knowing the structure of the Integrator complex will help scientists to better understand the interactions between its subunits and how it is involved in gene expression. (2021-02-05)

Father's early-life exposure to stress associated with child's brain development
The FinnBrain research of the University of Turku has demonstrated for the first time that the stress the father has experienced in his childhood is connected to the development of the white matter tracts in the child's brain. Whether this connection is transmitted through epigenetic inheritance needs further research. (2021-02-04)

How blood and lymph vessels remain separated after development
Researchers in Japan have clarified the mechanism by which blood and lymphatic vessels remain separated after development. The characteristics and structures of these two vessel types are very similar, and how they maintain separation has remained unexplained for many years. In this study, researchers found that the molecule Folliculin (FLCN) in vascular endothelial cells acts as a gatekeeper to maintain separation between the two. (2021-02-04)

Epigenomic map reveals circuitry of 30,000 human disease regions
MIT researchers have published the most comprehensive map yet of noncoding DNA circuitry, helping elucidate candidate mechanisms for 30,000 disease-associated regions. (2021-02-03)

BU researchers identify promising therapeutic agent against melanoma
There have been great advances in treating melanoma over the past five years, however, even with these treatments many patients quickly develop drug resistance and die from their disease. A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has discovered that a drug (YK-4-279) that was previously created to target one specific type of protein has much broader use against a family of proteins that act to promote melanoma. (2021-02-01)

Understanding how genetic motifs conduct "the music of life"
Our genetic codes control not only which proteins our cells produce, but also - to a great extent - in what quantity. This ground-breaking discovery, applicable to all biological life, was recently made by systems biologists at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, using supercomputers and artificial intelligence. Their research, which could also shed new light on the mysteries of cancer, was recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-28)

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke. The study is published in Neurology Genetics. (2021-01-28)

Toho university scientists find new mechanism to keep cell death pathway suppressed
A research group led by Prof. Hiroyasu Nakano at the Department of Biochemistry, Toho University Faculty of Medicine, identified Mind bomb-2 (MIB2) as an enzyme that ubiquitinates and modifies the protein cFLIP, which plays a central role in suppressing cell death. This finding indicates that ubiquitination of cFLIP by MIB2 plays an essential role in suppressing caspase 8-mediated cell death, suggesting that ubiquitination of cFLIP may be a promising target for development of therapies to control cell death. (2021-01-27)

Anti-freeze for cell membranes
Mosses and flowering plants took different genetic routes to evolve a similar defense mechanism. (2021-01-25)

Internet and freedom of speech, when metaphors give too much power
Since 1997, when the US supreme court metaphorically called the Internet the free market of ideas, attempts at regulation have been blocked by the 1st amendment. But with power concentrated in a few platforms, that metaphor is now misleading, says a study by Bocconi's Oreste Pollicino (2021-01-21)

Genetic rewiring behind spectacular evolutionary explosion in East Africa
Genetic rewiring could have driven an evolutionary explosion in the shapes, sizes and adaptations of cichlid fish, in East Africa's answer to Darwin's Galapagos finches. (2021-01-19)

Genome editing to treat human retinal degeneration
Gene editing therapies, including CRISPR-Cas systems, offer the potential to correct mutations causing inherited retinal degenerations, a leading cause of blindness. Technological advances in gene editing, continuing safety concerns, and strategies to overcome these challenges (2021-01-19)

Biodistribution of AAV gene transfer vectors in nonhuman primate
The biodistribution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vectors can be measured in nonhuman primates using a new method. The method quantifies whole-body and organ-specific AAV capsids from 1 to 72 hours after administration (2021-01-15)

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