Current General Anesthesia News and Events

Current General Anesthesia News and Events, General Anesthesia News Articles.
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Columbia researchers uncover altered brain connectivity after prolonged anesthesia
A body of evidence supports the association between prolonged anesthesia and cognitive impairment, but the Columbia study is first to address the effect of the procedure on neural connections. (2021-02-17)

The science of siestas: New research reveals the genetic basis for daytime napping
Researchers identified 123 regions in the human genome that are associated with daytime napping and three distinct mechanisms that promote napping. Many napping-related genes also regulate other aspects of sleep. (2021-02-10)

X-Stop® vs Laminectomy for lumbar spinal stenosis: Quality of life and cost-effectiveness
A randomized controlled trial of the X-Stop® interspinous distractor device and open laminectomy in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Both procedures improved the patients' quality of life; however, overall, laminectomy gave patients a better quality of life and was also more cost-effective. (2021-02-02)

New evidence sheds light on treatment for patients with respiratory failure from COVID-19
A study by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) provides new evidence that critically ill patients with COVID-19 who were treated with ECMO had better odds of survival than those who were not treated with ECMO. (2021-02-02)

When rhinos fly: Upside down the right way for transport
When it comes to saving endangered species of a certain size, conservationists often have to think outside the box. (2021-02-01)

Medicaid expansion in New York has improved maternal health, study finds
A new Columbia University study has found that Medicaid expansion in 2014 in New York State was associated with a statistically significant reduction in severe maternal morbidity in low-income women during delivery hospitalizations compared with high-income women. The decrease was even more pronounced in racial and ethnic minority women than in White women. Until now there was little research on the link between ACA Medicaid expansion and maternal health outcomes. (2021-01-29)

MRI helps unravel the mysteries of sleep
Scientists at EPFL and the Universities of Geneva, Cape Town and Bochum have joined forces to investigate brain activity during sleep with the help of MRI scans. It turns out our brains are much more active than we thought. (2021-01-22)

Routine thoracic surgery safe during COVID-19 pandemic
A study in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO) comparing surgeries performed at one Chinese hospital in 2019 with a similar date range during the COVID-19 pandemic found that routine thoracic surgery and invasive examinations were performed safely. The JTO is the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2021-01-19)

First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease. (2021-01-12)

New process evaluates patients for elective surgeries following COVID-19
Acknowledging that COVID-19 may be here to stay, Oregon Health & Science University has laid out a series of steps to prepare patients for elective surgery following their illness. The evaluation, outlined in a commentary published in the journal Perioperative Medicine, is believed to be the first published protocol laying out a COVID-era path forward in American medicine. (2021-01-12)

Imaging the twilight zone
What happens in the brain when our conscious awareness fades during general anesthesia and normal sleep? Finnish scientists studied this question with novel experimental designs and func-tional brain imaging. They succeeded in separating the specific changes related to consciousness from the more widespread overall effects, and discovered that the effects of anesthesia and sleep on brain activity were surprisingly similar. These novel findings point to a common central core brain network fundamental for human consciousness. (2020-12-29)

The brain network driving changes in consciousness
The loss and return of consciousness is linked to the same network of brain regions for both sleep and anesthesia, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-12-28)

Study reveals networks of genes involved in congenital heart disease
A group researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco led by Benoit Bruneau have made inroads into understanding what genes are improperly deployed in some cases of congenital heart disease. Their study, published in Developmental Cell, could point toward new ways to prevent or treat one of the most common birth defects. (2020-12-14)

Antiepileptic drug reduces motor neuron excitability in ALS
The antiepileptic drug ezogabine reduced pathologic excitability of cortical and spinal motor neuron cells that are early signs of clinical dysfunction in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study conducted by the Neurological Clinical Research Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In addition, the multi-site study involves the first clinical investigation of ALS using a drug identified through an induced pluripotent stem cell model. (2020-12-10)

Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) coil from GE shows promise for whole-brain imaging
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a prototype 16-channel head Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) radiofrequency coil from GE Healthcare outperformed a conventional 8-channel head coil for in vivo whole-brain imaging, though it did not perform as well as a conventional 32-channel head coil. (2020-12-03)

Spinal/epidural anesthesia associated with increased survival in leg artery bypass surgery
A new study published in The BMJ shows that people who had surgery to improve blood flow in their legs under spinal or epidural anesthesia were less likely to die than those who were given general anesthesia. (2020-11-25)

Ohio State study finds playing brain games before surgery helps improve recovery
A new study by led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine finds that exercising your brain with ''neurobics'' before surgery can help prevent post-surgery delirium. Essentially, your brain can be prepared for surgery, just as the body can, by keeping your mind active and challenged, according to findings published online in the journal JAMA Surgery. (2020-11-11)

Simultaneous kidney transplant plus weight loss surgery safe for obese patients
A new study shows that robotic-assisted kidney transplant and weight loss surgery can be performed safely. (2020-11-10)

Nasal septum surgery can affect behaviour, say medics from RUDN University
A team of medics from RUDN University conducted an experiment on rats and confirmed that surgeries in the nasal cavity can cause behavioral changes, namely, make the animals timider. This effect is associated with an ANS reaction triggered by stress. (2020-10-22)

Researchers seek to end unexpected bills for screening colonoscopies
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received ''surprise'' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. (2020-10-15)

Nearly 1 in 8 patients receive unexpected out-of-network bills after colonoscopy
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received potential 'surprise' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. These findings are concerning, as federal regulations eliminate consumer cost-sharing when screening colonoscopies are performed in-network. A brief research report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-10-12)

Labor epidurals do not cause autism; Safe for mothers and infants, say anesthesiology, obstetrics
Five medical societies aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article ''Association Between Epidural Analgesia During Labor and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring,'' a new retrospective database study published in JAMA Pediatrics on October 12th, 2020 does not provide credible scientific evidence that labor epidurals for pain relief cause autism. (2020-10-12)

Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate, researchers compared exposure to general anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during elective surgery, looking for potential links to the development of dementia. (2020-10-07)

Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states
The brain is assumed to exert homeostatic functions to always keep the cellular energy status constant, this has not been proven. Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science discovered that cortical neuronal intracellular concentrations of ATP, the major cellular energy metabolite, greatly decreased during REM sleep, despite a simultaneous increase in cerebral hemodynamics for energy supply, compared with waking in mice. These indicate that cerebral energy metabolism may not always meet neuronal energy demands. (2020-10-07)

Traveling brain waves help detect hard-to-see objects
A team of Salk Institute scientists led by Professor John Reynolds has uncovered details of the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of objects. They found that patterns of neural signals, called traveling brain waves, exist in the visual system of the awake brain and are organized to allow the brain to perceive objects that are faint or otherwise difficult to see. The findings were published in Nature on October 7, 2020. (2020-10-07)

Acupuncture before surgery means less pain, significantly fewer opioids for Veterans
Veterans who have acupuncture before surgery report less pain and need far fewer opioids to manage their discomfort, according to a randomized, controlled study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. Veterans who received acupuncture also reported they were more satisfied with their pain control than those who did not. (2020-10-05)

Cannabis use prompts need for more anesthesia during surgery, increases pain
Not only might cannabis users require more anesthesia during surgery than non-users, they may have increased pain afterwards and use higher doses of opioids while in the hospital, suggests first-of-its kind research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-05)

AI predicts patients at highest risk for severe pain, increased opioid use post-surgery
Artificial intelligence (AI) used in machine learning models can predict which patients are at highest risk for severe pain after surgery, and help determine who would most benefit from personalized pain management plans that use non-opioid alternatives, suggests new research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-04)

COVID-19 testing of children before anesthesia saves PPE
Universal COVID-19 testing of children who are having procedures requiring anesthesia promotes efficient use of personal protective equipment (PPE), according to research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Study: Unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements is and has been decreasing consistently since 2006. Still, researchers found, 30,000 out of every 100,000 stress tests performed each year were unnecessary, as the tests didn't decrease the frequency of complications such as heart attacks or stopped hearts. (2020-10-01)

Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. (2020-09-02)

Benefits of inhaled nitric oxide therapy for pregnant patients with COVID-19
Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) can be a valuable adjunct respiratory therapy for pregnant women with severe and critical COVID-19. (2020-08-26)

Brain noise contains unique signature of dream sleep
Dream or REM sleep is distinguished by rapid eye movement and absence of muscle tone, but electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are indistinguishable from those of an awake brain. UC Berkeley neuroscientists have now found an EEG signature of REM sleep, allowing scientists for the first time to distinguish dreaming from wakefulness through brain activity alone. This could help in determining the prognosis for coma patients, and allow study of the impact of anesthesia on dreaming. (2020-08-06)

Antibiotics alone successfully treat uncomplicated appendicitis in children
Of 1,068 patients from 10 health centers enrolled in the study, 67.1% of those who elected to initially manage their care through antibiotics alone experienced no harmful side effects and did not later require an appendectomy by their one-year follow-up appointment. Patients in the non-operative group experienced an average of 6.6 disability days, compared to the 10.9 days in the surgery group. (2020-07-27)

Post-surgical bleeding associated with more deaths when compared to blood clots after surgery
Post-surgical bleeding is associated with more deaths than blood clots from surgery, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia. (2020-07-21)

Back to the operating room: Orthopedic surgeons issue guidelines on resuming elective surgery amid COVID-19 pandemic
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, thousands of Americans have had to delay recommended but elective orthopedic surgical procedures, such as joint replacement surgery or knee arthroscopy. Now an expert panel has issued recommendations to guide safe resumption of elective orthopedic surgery. The guidelines appear in the July 15, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-07-15)

Improved cochlear implant device allows safe MRI in children without discomfort
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia. Findings were published in the peer-reviewed journal Laryngoscope. (2020-07-09)

Multispecialty centers for pediatric dysphagia deliver better outcomes, reduced costs
A new study has found that by combining different medical disciplines in one center to treat pediatric swallowing disorders rather than a typical care journey making appointments one specialist at a time, children had better outcomes, reduced the number of procedures needed, and health care costs were reduced. (2020-06-17)

Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may cut greenhouse gas emissions
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may help cut greenhouse emissions and ultimately help reduce global warming, indicates a real life example at one US hospital over the course of a year, and reported in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. (2020-06-16)

Minority students can become 'hyperpersistent' when they achieve better than middling grades
Scientists report that undergraduate students from underrepresented groups who score below a C- in general chemistry are less likely to persist in STEM classes than their classmates with similar grades, but they are much more likely than their peers to persist if they earn a C+ or better. The researchers suggest that improving the performance of all students could (2020-06-10)

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