Current Genetic Disease News and Events | Page 2

Current Genetic Disease News and Events, Genetic Disease News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Altered 'coat' disguises fatal brain virus from neutralizing antibodies
A genetic modification in the 'coat' of a brain infection-causing virus may allow it to escape antibodies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They say testing people for this and other viral mutations may help identify patients at risk for developing a fatal brain disease. (2020-11-20)

Children with familial hypercholesterolemia are diagnosed late and under-treated
Children born with a common genetic condition, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), are at increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) early in life. Despite long-standing national guidelines, cholesterol screening -- for children at age 2 for those with a family history of heart disease and between the ages of nine to 11 for all children -- is not being implemented . (2020-11-18)

Yale team finds way to protect genetic privacy in research
In a new report, a team of Yale scientists has developed a way to protect people's private genetic information while preserving the benefits of a free exchange of functional genomics data between researchers. (2020-11-12)

Genetic risk for fatal blood clots identified in IBD patients
In a retrospective study recently published in the journal Gastroenterology, Cedars-Sinai investigators found that a combination of rare and common genetic variants in some IBD patients significantly increased their risk of developing clot-causing thromboembolic diseases. (2020-11-11)

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related
The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture. In addition, individuals have migrated into and out of Scandinavia. These findings have emerged from new research at Uppsala University in which genetic material from more than 200 wolves was analysed. The study is published in the journal Evolutionary Applications. (2020-11-10)

Study dives into genetic risk of Alzheimer's and dementia for diverse Latinx groups
To better understand the association of the APOE gene with cognitive decline in Latinx populations, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and collaborators analyzed metrics of cognitive decline in six diverse Latinx populations: those of Cuban, Central American, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American backgrounds. They found that the APOE-ε4 genetic variant was associated with risk of cognitive decline in Latinx populations, with the strongest effect among those of Cuban backgrounds. (2020-11-06)

Host genetic factors shape composition of virus communities
Plants can be infected by multiple viruses at once. However, the composition of the pathogen community varies, even if individuals belong to the same species and the same population. Ecologists at the University of Zurich have now shown that these differences are primarily due to genetic variation among the hosts. The loss of genetic diversity could thus render species more vulnerable to infections and extinction. (2020-11-05)

Unraveling the genetic determinants of small vessel vasculitis
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the single-nucleotide variants of TERT and DSP, which promote risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), are significantly associated with susceptibility to microscopic polyangiitis and myeloperoxidase-ANCA associated vasculitis. Interestingly, there was no clear link to the severe complication interstitial lung disease (ILD). These findings suggest a shared genetic susceptibility between IPF and ANCA-associated vasculitides that may be independent of ILD risk. (2020-11-03)

Mayo Clinic study finds 1 in 8 patients with cancer harbor inherited genetic mutations
PHOENIX, Ariz. ? Genetic testing can uncover inherited genetic mutations, and could individualize cancer therapies, improve survival, manage cancer in loved ones and push the boundaries of precision medicine. (2020-11-02)

CHOP genomic study reveals role for hypothalamus in inflammatory bowel disease
Using sophisticated 3D genomic mapping and integrating with public data resulting from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found significant genetic correlations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and stress and depression. (2020-10-29)

New assay screens human brain organoids, doubles known candidate genes for microcephaly
A new tissue screening assay for human cerebral organoids identified 25 additional candidate genes for microcephaly, nearly doubling the number of currently known genes linked to the rare neurological condition. (2020-10-29)

A groundbreaking genetic screening tool for human organoids
Researchers from the laboratory of Jürgen Knoblich at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - developed CRISPR-LICHT, a revolutionary technology that allows genetic screens in human tissues such as brain organoids. By applying the novel technology to brain organoids, the ER-stress pathway was identified to play a major role in regulating the size of the human brain. The results are published in the renowned journal Science. (2020-10-29)

Cognitive disorders linked to severe COVID-19 risk
Dementia and other cognitive disorders now appear to be risk factors for developing severe COVID-19, according to research from the University of Georgia. (2020-10-28)

Cleveland Clinic-led research team identifies differences between benign and pathogenic variants
An international team of researchers led by Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute has performed for the first time a wide-scale characterization of missense variants from 1,330 disease-associated genes. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study identifies features associated with pathogenic and benign variants that reveal the effects of the mutations at a molecular level. (2020-10-27)

New approach to diagnosing genetic diseases using RNA sequencing increases yield
A new study from Baylor College of Medicine finds that starting genetic analysis with RNA sequencing can increase diagnostic yield and confidence in diagnosis. (2020-10-27)

Breast cancer risk and disease-causing mutations in women over age 65
In a new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting, researchers investigated the prevalence of disease-causing variants in established breast cancer predisposition genes in women over age 65. (2020-10-26)

Gut bacteria associated with animal-based diet may mitigate risk of cardiovascular disease
Researchers have found that a type of common gut bacteria sometimes associated with inflammation, abscesses, bowel disease and cancer has a major silver lining: It seems to help prevent cardiovascular disease. (2020-10-26)

Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. A study led by the University of Zurich has now shown how this genetic predisposition contributes to the development of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis in combination with environmental factors. The decisive factor is the shaping of a repertoire of immune cells which - although they are effective in fighting off pathogens such as Epstein-Barr virus - also attack brain tissue. (2020-10-22)

USC leads massive new artificial intelligence study of Alzheimer's
Forty co-investigators at 11 research centers will team up to leverage artificial intelligence and machine learning to bolster precision diagnostics, prognosis and the development of new treatments for Alzheimer's disease. (2020-10-22)

Scientists map the human proteome
Twenty years after the release of the human genome, the genetic 'blueprint' of human life, an international research team, including the University of British Columbia's Chris Overall, has now mapped the first draft sequence of the human proteome. (2020-10-19)

Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder. The study is reported in this month's JCI Insight. (2020-10-15)

New study highlights links between inflammation and Parkinson's disease
An international collaboration involving researchers from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biology (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg established an association between inflammation and specific genetic mutations in Parkinson's patients. The study, recently published in the scientific journal Brain, highlights two biomarkers that could be used to assess Parkinson's disease state and progression. The results also suggest that targeting the immune system with anti-inflammatory medication holds the potential to influence the disease course, at least in a subset of patients. (2020-10-14)

Penn Medicine researchers use artificial intelligence to 'redefine' Alzheimer's Disease
The researchers will apply advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to integrate and find patterns in genetic, imaging, and clinical data from over 60,000 Alzheimer's patients -- representing one of the largest and most ambitious research undertakings of its kind. (2020-10-14)

Single gene disorders not so simple after all
Traditionally, geneticists divide disorders into ''simple,'' where a single gene mutation causes disease, or complex, where mutations in many genes contribute modest amounts. A new study suggests that the truth is somewhere in between. (2020-10-12)

The propagation of admixture-derived evolutionary potential
Adaptive radiation - the rapid evolution of many new species from a single ancestor - is a major focus in evolutionary biology. Adaptive radiations often show remarkable repeatability where lineages have undergone multiple episodes of adaptive radiation in distant places and at various points in time - implying their extraordinary evolutionary potential. (2020-10-07)

Researchers use multi-ancestry comparison to refine risk factors for coronary artery disease
An international group led by researchers from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences have used a combination of genome-wide association analysis--or GWAS--and a trans-ancestry comparison of different GWAS studies, to come up with a more accurate predictor of coronary artery disease based on genetic factors. (2020-10-06)

Testing for a lipoprotein linked to heart risk is as effective as blood work
Elevated levels of a little-known lipoprotein in the blood that may put people at high risk of cardiovascular disease can be as accurately detected by genetic testing as by conventional laboratory measurement. (2020-10-06)

Researchers zero in on genetic connection to postpartum hemorrhage
Researchers have identified genetic mutations that appear to protect women from severe bleeding after childbirth, a leading cause of maternal death. A preliminary study of the findings is being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Nurture trumps nature in determining severity of PTSD symptoms
Researchers at Yale and elsewhere previously identified a host of genetic risk factors that help explain why some veterans are especially susceptible to the debilitating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2020-10-01)

The ancient Neanderthal hand in severe COVID-19
Genetic variants that leave their carrier more susceptible to severe COVID-19 are inherited from Neanderthals, finds a new study published in Nature. (2020-09-30)

Even in people with Parkinson's gene, coffee may be protective
Even for people with a gene mutation tied to Parkinson's disease, coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of actually developing the disease, according to a new study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-09-30)

Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain
Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior. The findings from scientists at the University of Copenhagen support a growing body of evidence that obesity is a disease whose roots are in the brain. (2020-09-29)

Inside mitochondria and their fascinating genome
EPFL scientists have observed -- for the first time in living cells -- the way mitochondria distribute their transcriptome throughout the cell, and it involves RNA granules that turn out to be highly fluid. (2020-09-28)

Genetic testing cost effective for newly diagnosed GIST
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers reported that genetic testing is cost-effective and beneficial for newly diagnosed patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a rare type of cancer. (2020-09-28)

A genetic variant that protects against Alzheimer's disease promotes immune cell functions
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland found that the PLCG2-P522R genetic variant, which protects against Alzheimer's disease, enhances several key functions of immune cells. The results obtained in the study highlight the importance of immune cells as a target of future development of new therapies for Alzheimer's disease. (2020-09-25)

Genetic study uncovers mutation associated with fibromuscular dysplasia
Researchers report first clinically actionable findings for a rare blood vessel disease in a study of four unrelated families, all with the same genetic variant. (2020-09-24)

Study shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes, regardless of genetic risk
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes (T2D) among middle-aged individuals, regardless of any genetic predisposition they may have towards developing the disease. (2020-09-23)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Shared protein fingerprint could simplify treatment of common inherited heart disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists discovered that many different genetic mutations result in surprisingly similar changes to heart muscle proteins in patients with the most severe manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (2020-09-22)

New cause of syndromic microcephaly identified
A team of international collaborators identifies a new cause of syndromic microcephaly caused by LMNB1 mutations that disrupt the nuclear envelope. The report is published in the October issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2020-09-17)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.