Current Genetic Markers News and Events

Current Genetic Markers News and Events, Genetic Markers News Articles.
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Kittens could hold key to understanding deadly diarrheal disease in children
Kittens could be the model for understanding infectious, sometimes deadly, diarrheal disease in both animals and children. (2021-02-23)

Genetic tool improves estimation of prostate cancer risk in diverse ethnic/racial groups
Scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine validated a more inclusive and comprehensive genetic tool, known as a polygenic hazard score (PHS), for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer. (2021-02-23)

Don't focus on genetic diversity to save our species
Scientists at the University of Adelaide have challenged the common assumption that genetic diversity of a species is a key indicator of extinction risk. Published in the journal PNAS, the scientists demonstrate that there is no simple relationship between genetic diversity and species survival. But, Dr João Teixeira and Dr Christian Huber from the University of Adelaide's School of Biological Sciences conclude, the focus shouldn't be on genetic diversity anyway, it should be on habitat protection. (2021-02-22)

A novel gel electrophoresis technique for rapid biomarker diagnosis via mass spectrometry
Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis enables high-resolution separation of proteins extracted from biological samples, but it requires more than one day of pretreatment to recover the separated proteins trapped inside the gel for detection by mass spectrometry. BAC-DROP, our novel electrophoresis technology, uses a dissolvable form of polyacrylamide gel, which allows sample pretreatment to be completed in about 5 hours. The developed technology will enable the rapid diagnosis of viruses and disease protein markers. (2021-02-18)

A (pollen-free) sigh of relief for Japan: The genetics of male sterility in cedar trees
Pollen from Cryptomeria japonica, or Japanese cedar, is widely known to cause allergies. But, male-sterile trees are known to be devoid of pollen. Now, researchers from the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Japan, have studied the genetic variations in the male sterility gene (MS1) in these trees. This can help in selectively breeding male-sterile plants to counter the discomfort caused by pollen allergies and overcome the need to stay indoors during the pollen season. (2021-02-17)

How healthy lifestyle behaviours can improve cholesterol profiles
Combining healthy lifestyle interventions reduces heart disease through beneficial effects on different lipoproteins and associated cholesterols, according to a study published February 9 in eLife. (2021-02-16)

Metabolic response behind reduced cancer cell growth
Researchers from Uppsala University show in a new study that inhibition of the protein EZH2 can reduce the growth of cancer cells in the blood cancer multiple myeloma. The reduction is caused by changes in the cancer cells' metabolism. These changes can be used as markers to discriminate whether a patient would respond to treatment by EZH2 inhibition. The study has been published in the journal Cell Death & Disease. (2021-02-12)

New study identifies the main genetic causes of autoimmune Addison's disease
Scientists from the University of Bergen (Norway) and Karolinska Institutet (Sweden) have discovered the genes involved in autoimmune Addison's disease. (2021-02-12)

TalTech scientists developed novel immune diagnostics of multiple sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disease in young adults, affecting more than 2 million individuals worldwide, with about 1500 cases in Estonia. About 20% of MS patients experience optic neuritis (ON) as the presenting symptom, but not all ON patients develop MS. (2021-02-11)

Cataloguing genetic information about yams
New collection of resources will help yam breeders and farmers. (2021-02-10)

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore intermingle across equator
Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers at Oregon State University have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from. (2021-02-10)

A recipe for regenerating bioengineered hair
Scientists have recently developed ways to grow a variety of useful items in laboratories, from meat and diamonds to retinas and other organoids. At the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan, a team led by Takashi Tsuji has been working on ways to regenerate lost hair from stem cells. In an important step, a new study identifies a population of hair follicle stem cells in the skin and a recipe for normal cyclical regeneration in the lab. (2021-02-10)

Grape consumption may protect against UV damage to skin
A recent human study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that consuming grapes protected against ultraviolet (UV) skin damage. Study subjects showed increased resistance to sunburn and a reduction in markers of UV damage at the cellular level. Natural components found in grapes known as polyphenols are thought to be responsible for these beneficial effects. (2021-02-05)

Father's early-life exposure to stress associated with child's brain development
The FinnBrain research of the University of Turku has demonstrated for the first time that the stress the father has experienced in his childhood is connected to the development of the white matter tracts in the child's brain. Whether this connection is transmitted through epigenetic inheritance needs further research. (2021-02-04)

Best of both worlds: A hybrid method for tracking laparoscopic ultrasound transducers
In a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Imaging, a team of scientists from the US have come up with a creative solution. Instead of relying entirely on either hardware- or CV-based tracking, they propose a hybrid approach that combines both methods. (2021-02-04)

Study examines role of biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury in cancer patients
A study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in Kidney International Reports finds that immune checkpoint inhibitors, may have negative consequences in some patients, including acute kidney inflammation, known as interstitial nephritis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are used to treat cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancerous cells. (2021-02-03)

MSK scientists learn how genes and environment conspire in pancreatic cancer development
Both genes and environment are necessary to trigger pancreatic cancer development. A new study from Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers explains why. (2021-02-03)

"Genetic SD-card": Scientists obtained new methods to improve the genome editing system
Researchers take a step in the development of genome editing technology. Currently it is possible to deliver genetic material of different sizes and structures to organs and tissues. This is the key to eliminating DNA defects and treating more patients. (2021-02-02)

Genetic screening before prescribing could benefit millions
New research finds that millions of UK patients could benefit from genetic screening (cheek swab) before being prescribed common medications including antidepressants, stomach ulcer treatments and painkillers. More than 95 per cent of the population carry a genetic marker that predicts an atypical response to at least one medicine. The study looked at nine of these genetic markers, affecting 56 medicines where there are known drug-gene interactions. (2021-01-29)

Discovery of early plasma biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease
A Quebec research team has discovered two early plasma markers to detect Alzheimer's disease five years before its onset. The results of this recent study have been published in the prestigious scientific journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions (TRCI). (2021-01-28)

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke. The study is published in Neurology Genetics. (2021-01-28)

Genomic studies implicate specific genes in post-traumatic stress disorder
After analyzing the genomes of more 250,000 military veterans, researchers have identified 18 specific, fixed positions on chromosomes that appear associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. The findings may point to new therapeutic drug targets. (2021-01-28)

At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms
For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports. They show that mouse pups prefer their mothers to unfamiliar mouse mothers as newborns and remember them after up to 100 days apart--although they prefer unfamiliar mouse mothers as adults. (2021-01-26)

Study reveals new insights into the link between sunlight exposure and kidney damage
A new collaborative study from researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and the University of Washington and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveals unexpected insights into how skin exposure to ultraviolet light can worsen clinical symptoms in autoimmune diseases such as lupus. (2021-01-21)

Spontaneous cell fusions amplify genetic diversity within tumors, Moffitt researchers say
Scientists generally believe that cancers lack a powerful and important diversification mechanism available to pathogenic microbes - the ability to exchange and recombine genetic material between different cells. However, in a new article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers demonstrate that this belief is wrong and that cancer cells are capable of exchanging and recombining their genetic material with each other through a mechanism mediated by cell fusions. (2021-01-20)

Eating habits partly down to your genetics, finds new study
Your food intake patterns are partly under genetic control, according to the latest research from researchers at King's College London, published today in the journal Twin Research and Human Genetics. (2021-01-19)

IOF and IFCC review calls for harmonization of assays for reference bone turnover markers
The newly published review 'Analytical considerations and plans to standardize or harmonize assays for the reference bone turnover markers PINP and β-CTX in blood' describes the current status of assays for PINP and β-CTX in blood, as well as the plans for and ongoing progress towards the achievement of harmonization or standardization of commercial assays for these reference markers. (2021-01-15)

Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments. (2021-01-14)

Sperm-specific gene expression in organisms including mice, macaques and men
A large class of mammalian genes is not completely shared throughout sperm development and differentiation, according to a new study of sperm in organisms including mice, macaques and men. (2021-01-14)

Inferring human genomes at a fraction of the cost promises to boost biomedical research
A new method, developed by Olivier Delaneau's group at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne, offers game-changing possibilities for genetic association studies and biomedical research. For less than $1 in computational cost, GLIMPSE is able to statistically infer a complete human genome from a very small amount of data. It offers a first realistic alternative to current approaches, and so allows a wider inclusion of underrepresented populations. (2021-01-13)

First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease. (2021-01-12)

Study reveals strong links between gut microbes, diet and metabolic health
The largest and most detailed study of its kind has uncovered strong links between a person's diet, the microbes in their gut (microbiome) and their health. This interrelationship appears to associate with an individual's risk of some serious conditions, including diabetes and heart disease. The study shows that gut microbe composition is highly individualized, and these findings could be used to provide personal dietary advice for better health. (2021-01-11)

Landmark study reveals link between gut microbes, diet and illnesses
Diets rich in healthy and plant-based foods encourages the presence of gut microbes that are linked to a lower risk of common illnesses including heart disease, research has found. (2021-01-11)

Long-term study finds dozens of new genetic markers associated with lifetime bone growth
A multidisciplinary team of researchers has discovered several genetic markers associated with bone mineral accrual, which could ultimately help identify causes of eventual osteoporosis earlier in life through genetic testing. (2021-01-06)

Low genetic diversity in two manatee species off South America
A new study finds low genetic diversity in the Antillean manatee off the coast of South America between Venezuela and Brazil. There is no interbreeding with the overlapping Amazonian manatee. The study gives recommendations for conservation actions for these at-risk populations. (2021-01-05)

Risk of extinction cascades from freshwater mussels to a bitterling fish
Reproduction of native and invasive bitterling fishes and their hybridisation was studied in Japan. We collected mussels in which these bitterlings lay their eggs, kept them in aquaria, collected eggs/larvae ejected from mussels, and genotyped them. We found that hybrids occurred when local mussel density was low. The rapid decline of the host mussels and artificial introduction of an invasive congener interacted to cause the rapid decline of a native fish. (2021-01-04)

Largest, most diverse ever study of prostate cancer genetics brings disparities into focus
The largest, most diverse study of genetic variations related to prostate cancer shows evidence that genetics play some part in health disparities among different racial groups. The analysis includes 269 genetic variations that increase risk, 86 of them newly discovered by the researchers. Assessing risk based on a model incorporating these genetic factors researchers showed that men of African ancestry inherit about twice the prostate cancer risk on average compared to men of European ancestry. (2021-01-04)

Sustained cellular immune dysregulation in individuals recovering from COVID-19
Ongoing observational clinical research has become a priority to better understand how the COVID-19 virus acts, and findings from this research can better inform treatment and vaccine design. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have now reported their observational study, ''Sustained cellular immune dysregulation in individuals recovering from SARS-CoV-2 infection,'' published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2020-12-29)

New mammal reference genome helps ID genetic variants for human health
A new reference genome assembly identified more than 85 million genetic variants in the rhesus macaque, the largest database of genetic variation for any one nonhuman primate species to date. (2020-12-23)

Exposure to metals can impact pregnancy
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead may disrupt a woman's hormones during pregnancy, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-21)

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