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Current Genetics News and Events, Genetics News Articles.
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Breast cancer patients to be evaluated for genetic testing
The guidance from the ACMG differs from a consensus guideline issued in February by the American Society of Breast Surgeons, which recommended genetic testing for all newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer. The ACMG recommends evaluations before genetic testing. (2019-12-12)

Intestinal stem cell genes may link dietary fat and colon cancer
Two genes that appear to help stem cells in the intestine burn dietary fat may play a role in colon cancer, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, describes a new connection between the way cells consume fat and how genes regulate stem cell behavior in the intestines of mice. (2019-11-25)

Mapping millet genetics
New DNA sequences will aid in the development of improved millet varieties (2019-10-23)

Researchers quantify Cas9-caused off-target mutagenesis in mice
Scientists are finding new ways to improve the use of the CRISPR enzyme Cas9 and reduce the chances of off-target mutations in laboratory mice, according to new results from a research collaboration. The findings, which help scientists contextualize a common concern related to gene editing and identify new strategies to improve its precision, were presented as a featured plenary abstract at the American Society of Human Genetics 2019 Annual Meeting in Houston. (2019-10-18)

Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife
Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Researchers increasingly are embracing the power of ancient DNA from old museum specimens to answer questions about climate change, habitat loss and other stresses on surviving populations. (2019-10-17)

Quantifying Hispanic and Latinx populations' interest in genetic research participation
Researchers are increasingly prioritizing the need for diversity in genetics and genomics research. To help make such studies more inclusive, José G. Pérez-Ramos, MPH and Timothy D.V. Dye, PhD, research scientists at the University of Rochester examined Hispanic and Latinx populations' desire to participate in genomics research. Mr. Pérez-Ramos presented the findings at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2019 Annual Meeting in Houston, Texas. (2019-10-16)

Fruit flies help in the development of personalized medicine
It is common knowledge that there is a connection between our genes and the risk of developing certain diseases. In a study on fruit flies, researchers from Aarhus University and Aalborg University have found that gene mapping can also be used to predict response to a given treatment. This knowledge is crucial for the development of personalised medicine. (2019-10-09)

Researchers fail to replicate influential neuroimaging genetics study
Neuroscientists have failed to replicate the findings of an influential study linking genetics to cognition. Published in JNeurosci, the researchers highlight issues in the design, analysis, and interpretation of the original study. (2019-09-30)

Some high-cholesterol genes differ between countries
Some of the genes that predict the risk of high cholesterol don't apply to people from Uganda the same as they do in European populations, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature Communications. (2019-09-24)

Early signs of adult diabetes are visible in children as young as 8 years old
Early signs of adulthood type 2 diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old, decades before it is likely to be diagnosed, according to a new genetic study being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20). (2019-09-17)

ASHG asserts core genetic data privacy principles for all research and funding arenas
The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) today affirmed the crucial role of genetic and genomic data sharing to advance medicine and health research, and asserted core principles about privacy protections that should apply to all human genetics and genomics research regardless of funding source. The Society's views appear today in The American Journal of Human Genetics (AJHG). (2019-09-05)

Lifestyle, not genetics, explains most premature heart disease
Physical inactivity, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol play a greater role than genetics in many young patients with heart disease, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. The findings show that healthy behaviors should be a top priority for reducing heart disease even in those with a family history of early onset. (2019-09-02)

Study of bile acids links individual's genetics and microbial gut community
In a new study published Aug. 29, 2019 in PLOS Genetics, Federico Rey of the University of Wisconsin -- Madison and colleagues identified genetic variants in mice that impact the levels of different bile acids as well as the size of a specific population of microbes in the gut. (2019-08-29)

The making of 'Fancy Mouse'
For the past few hundred years, the colorful hair and unique patterns of the so-called 'Fancy Mouse' have made them the stars of pet shows in Japan and beyond. Now, scientists have finally revealed the true cause of the genetic mutation responsible for the iconic black pigmentation in the popular East Asian pet. The findings were published on August 2, 2019, in Communications Biology. (2019-08-27)

Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. The study of the finches of the Galapagos Islands could change the way conservation biologists think about species with naturally fragmented populations to understand their potential for extinction.  (2019-08-22)

Jogging and five other exercises ward off weight gain despite 'obesity genes'
For people who inherited genes that increase their chance of becoming obese, there is hope for keeping the weight off. A study by Wan-Yu Lin of National Taiwan University and colleagues, published Aug. 1 in PLOS Genetics, identified the types of exercise that are especially effective at combating genetic effects that contribute to obesity. (2019-08-01)

Largest ever study finds links in epilepsy genes
Researchers and patients from Austin Health and the University of Melbourne have been involved in the largest ever study looking at the genetic sequences of people with epilepsy. (2019-08-01)

Mouse genetics influences the microbiome more than environment
Genetics has a greater impact on the microbiome than maternal birth environment, at least in mice, according to a study published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Vaginal birth, known to transfer microbiota to a newborn, failed to make a lasting microbial imprint on offspring. (2019-07-26)

New Zealanders involved in global study showing genetic predisposition for anorexia
University of Otago, Christchurch researchers played a key role in new global research showing the causes of the eating disorder anorexia are likely metabolic as well as psychological. (2019-07-16)

Discovery linking microbes to methane emissions could make agriculture more sustainable
Common dairy cows share the same core group of genetically inherited gut microbes, which influence factors such as how much methane the animals release during digestion and how efficiently they produce milk, according to a new study. (2019-07-03)

Men ask most of the questions at scientific conferences; we can choose to change that
Even in a majority-women audience at an academic conference, men ask questions most of the time, researchers report on June 27, 2019 in The American Journal of Human Genetics. After analyzing participation in Q&As at the American Society of Human Genetics and Biology of Genomes conferences over four years, the study authors found that public discussion and policy change focused on gender equity can make a significant difference. (2019-06-27)

Global data resource shows genetic diversity of chickens
A total of 174 chicken breeds are described in a publicly accessible database which scientists from the University of Göttingen and the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Neustadt-Mariensee have built up in recent years with numerous international partners. This database, the Synbreed Chicken Diversity Panel (SCDP), includes information about a large proportion of the available chicken species and their diversity. The researchers created a family tree of exceptional completeness and detail. The results have been published in the journal BMC Genomics. (2019-06-20)

Scientists demonstrate the advantages of diverse populations when compiling genetic data
Relying strictly on genetic data from those of European descent, rather than more diverse populations, can exacerbate existing disease and increase health care disparities, according to new research. (2019-06-19)

Reanalysis of clinical molecular data yields new genetic diagnoses
Reanalysis of clinical exome sequencing data can efficiently increase the molecular diagnostic rate of undiagnosed diseases. (2019-06-19)

Researchers link gene to cannabis abuse
New research from the national psychiatric project, iPSYCH, shows that a specific gene is associated with an increased risk of cannabis abuse. The gene is the source of a so-called nicotine receptor in the brain, and people with low amounts of this receptor have an increased risk of cannabis abuse. (2019-06-18)

People using third-party apps to analyze personal genetic data
The burgeoning field of personal genetics appeals to people who want to learn more about themselves, their family and their propensity for diseases. More and more consumers are using services like 23andMe to learn about their genetic blueprint. (2019-06-13)

How the cell protects itself
The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. This movement protects the genetic transcripts from the recruitment of 'spliceosomes'. If this protection does not happen, the entire cell is in danger: meaning that cancer and neurodegenerative diseases can develop. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the University Medicine Centre Göttingen have demonstrated the underlying mechanism in the cell. The results were published in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-06-12)

How artificial intelligence detects rare diseases
Every year, around half a million children worldwide are born with a rare hereditary disease. Obtaining a definitive diagnosis can be difficult and time consuming. In a study of 679 patients with 105 different rare diseases, scientists from the University of Bonn and the Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that artificial intelligence can be used to diagnose rare diseases more efficiently and reliably. A neural network automatically combines portrait photos with genetic and patient data. (2019-06-06)

Freshwater find: Genetic advantage allows some marine fish to colonize freshwater habitats
Fishes are present in not only marine but also freshwater environments. However, only few fish lineages could colonize freshwater habitats. What enable some lineages to colonize freshwater? Dr. Asano Ishikawa and Dr. Jun Kitano at the National Institute of Genetics, Japan, collaborated with international researchers to answer this question. They found that Fatty acid desaturase 2 (Fads2) is a key gene important for freshwater colonization in fishes. (2019-05-30)

Owning a dog is influenced by our genetic make-up
A team of Swedish and British scientists have studied the heritability of dog ownership using information from 35,035 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry. The new study suggests that genetic variation explains more than half of the variation in dog ownership, implying that the choice of getting a dog is heavily influenced by an individual's genetic make-up. (2019-05-17)

How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight
The largest study of its kind has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight. (2019-05-01)

Study merges big data and zebrafish biology to reveal mechanisms of human disease
In a series of studies that volleyed between large databases and research in zebrafish, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a link between vascular biology and eye disease. The research uncovered an unexpected role for the gene GRIK5, and it showcases a new paradigm for using biobanks, electronic health records and zebrafish to discover the genetic mechanisms that contribute to human disease. The findings were reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2019-04-24)

Researchers find high-risk genes for schizophrenia
Using a unique computational 'framework' they developed, a team of scientist cyber-sleuths in the Vanderbilt University Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute (VGI) has identified 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia. (2019-04-22)

A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA
History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered. The work appears April 18 in The American Journal of Human Genetics. (2019-04-18)

Gene responsible for toxic metal accumulation in durum wheat identified
University of Alberta biologists identify gene responsible for cadmium accumulation in durum wheat, according to a new study published in Nature Genetics. For humans, consuming cadmium, a toxic metal that accumulates in grain crops, poses serious health risks, including cancer and kidney disease. (2019-04-09)

Opitz C Syndrome: New advances to improve the genetic diagnose of an ultra-rare disease
Opitz C syndrome (OCS), an ultra-rare disease that causes serious physical and intellectual disabilities, has an heterogeneous genetic base that makes its medical diagnostic and therapeutic intervention difficult. A new study concludes that this severe and extremely rare disease could be considered a 'private syndrome' for each patient. (2019-04-04)

Defining the responsibility to recontact research participants with new genetic findings
ASHG, along with several co-signing organizations, issued a position statement today outlining whether, and to what extent, there is a responsibility to recontact genetic and genomic research participants when new findings emerge that suggest their genetic information should be interpreted differently, which would allow participants to benefit from current genomics advances. (2019-04-04)

Nature versus nurture: Environment exerts greater influence on corn health than genetics
In one of the largest and most diverse leaf microbe studies to date, the team monitored the active bacteria on the leaves of 300 diverse lines of corn growing in a common environment. They were especially interested to see how corn genes affected bacteria and found there was little relationship between the two--in fact, the bacteria were much more affected by the environment, although genetics still had a small role. (2019-04-02)

Researchers discover two, rare genes associated with Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have identified two, extremely rare genetic variants linked to Alzheimer disease (AD) for the first time. These variants, one located in the NOTCH3 gene and the other in the TREM2 gene, were observed in persons with AD but not in any of the controls. (2019-03-29)

Study questions value of genetic risk scores
What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background. While a recent publication claimed that the GPS could be used by doctors to identify patients at high risk of conditions such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, a new Annals of Human Genetics study casts doubt on these claims. (2019-03-25)

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