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Current Genome News and Events, Genome News Articles.
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How new species arise in the sea
How can a species split into several new species if they still live close to each other and are able to interbreed? (2019-03-04)
Checking DNA base editor's mistakes and tricks to reduce them
IBS scientists have identified the mistake-rate of DNA editing tools, based on CRISPR and known as adenine base editors. (2019-03-04)
Genomic testing of a single patient reveals a gene commonly mutated in pediatric melanoma
Comprehensive clinical genomic testing of an adolescent patient, including whole genome sequencing, helped researchers identify mutations in a single gene that drive the most common childhood melanoma. (2019-03-04)
Researchers reveal unexpected genome-wide off-target mutations caused by cytosine base editing
A research team led by Professor GAO Caixia of the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences performed a comprehensive investigation of the off-target mutations of BE3, HF1-BE3 and ABE using whole genome sequencing (WGS) in rice, an important crop species. (2019-02-28)
China-led research collaboration develops new way to test gene-editing safety
Chinese and international scientists have developed a new technique to evaluate the safety of genome-editing tools -- a method that could become the industry standard. (2019-02-28)
Scientists lay foundation for single-cell level understanding of DNA replication
A research team established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells. (2019-02-25)
Cool adaptations to the cold
Icefish live in an environment that should be deadly for them. (2019-02-25)
Uncovering the origins of cultivated strawberries
In a new study published in Nature Genetics, researchers now unveil how the strawberry became an octoploid, as well as the genetics that determine important fruit quality traits. (2019-02-25)
Breeding a better strawberry
An international team of scientists led by the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits. (2019-02-25)
Common virus is 'less prone to mutation' giving hope for vaccine development
One of the commonest causes of congenital disability, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is less prone to mutation than previously thought, a finding which could help develop a successful vaccine, UCL researchers have found. (2019-02-25)
Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins
CRG investigators develop a technique to identify and classify proteins with less than 100 amino acids. (2019-02-22)
Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a 'hit and run' approach. (2019-02-22)
New strategy improves efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing
The efficiency of CRISPR genome editing tools targeted to the site of interest by Cas9 nucleases varies considerably and a new CMP-fusion strategy, called CRISPR-chrom, enhances the activity up to several-fold. (2019-02-21)
Researchers find genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry
In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry. (2019-02-20)
New blood test may map fetal genome for countless mutations
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new blood test for genetic disorders that may allow parents to learn about the health of their baby as early as 11 weeks into pregnancy. (2019-02-20)
New study shows hidden genes may underlie autism severity
Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have implicated a largely hidden part of the human genome in the severity of autism symptoms, a discovery that could lead to new insights into the disorder and eventually to clinical therapies for the condition. (2019-02-15)
Uncovering a 'smoking gun' of biological aging clocks
A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual's chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H. (2019-02-14)
More scrutiny needed for less-deadly foodborne bacteria
Employing advanced genetic-tracing techniques and sharing the data produced in real time could limit the spread of bacteria -- Bacillus cereus -- which cause foodborne illness, according to researchers who implemented whole-genome sequencing of a pathogen-outbreak investigation. (2019-02-13)
Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria
Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. (2019-02-08)
The novel method Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments
The group of Dr. Cerón at IDIBELL used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to optimize the technique, leading to the development of the method called Nested CRISPR. (2019-02-07)
Male Y chromosomes not 'genetic wastelands'
Researchers from the University of Rochester have found a way to sequence a large portion of the Y chromosome in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster--the most that the Y chromosome has been assembled in fruit flies. (2019-02-06)
Genome structure of malaria parasites linked to virulence
An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology has found that malaria parasite genomes are shaped by parasite-specific gene families, and that this genome organization strongly correlates with the parasite's virulence. (2019-02-04)
Over 800 new genome regions possibly relevant to human evolution identified
Researchers at the UAB have found genetic evidence of adaptations in 2,859 regions of the human genome, including some well-known examples such as those responsible for milk tolerance or high-altitude adaptation. (2019-02-04)
How transcription factors explore the genome
EPFL scientists have discovered how proteins that regulate gene transcription can scan and bind the genome efficiently. (2019-01-30)
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
Genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. (2019-01-30)
Huge step forward in decoding genomes of small species
For the first time, scientists have read the whole genetic code of one single mosquito. (2019-01-29)
Kick-starting the genome in early development
We can think of the egg and sperm as information capsules with stored instructions for starting a new life, but post fertilisation, what kick starts the interpretation of these instructions? (2019-01-28)
PopPUNK advances speed of bacterial pathogen surveillance
In a study published today in Genome Research, researchers developed PopPUNK (Population Partitioning Using Nucleotide K-mers), a computational tool for analyzing tens of thousands of bacterial genomes in a single run, up to 200-fold faster than previous methods. (2019-01-24)
Sci-fi to reality: Superpowered salamander may hold the key to human regeneration
Scientists at the Unviersity of Kentucky have assembled the entire genome of the Mexican Axolotl, the key to unlocking the secrets of regeneration with potential for life-changing clinical applications down the road. (2019-01-24)
Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn
Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute suggests. (2019-01-22)
Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA
Scientists have traditionally thought that DNA binding proteins use patterns in the genome's code of As, Cs, Ts, and Gs to guide them to the right location, with a given protein only binding to a specific sequence of letters. (2019-01-16)
Genome doubling, cell size and novelty
In the 2019 Coulter Review, 'Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell,' published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. (2019-01-15)
Differences in genes' geographic origin influence mitochondrial function
A new study explores whether interactions between genomes found in the nucleus and in the mitochondria of a cell could be altered when genes of different geographic origins are brought together. (2019-01-14)
Mobile, instant diagnosis of viruses
In a first for plant virology, a team from CIRAD recently used nanopore technology to sequence the entire genomes of two yam RNA viruses. (2019-01-10)
New biomarker links cancer progression to genome instability
A new Tel Aviv University study identifies elevated levels of a protein called ubiquilin-4 as a new biomarker for genome instability. (2019-01-10)
New CRISPR-Cas9 variants can respond to viral proteases
Using a technique called circular permutation, researchers at the University of California Berkeley have created a new suite of Cas9 variants called Cas9-CPs, which will simplify design of Cas9-fusion proteins for diverse applications beyond simple DNA cutting, such as base editing and epigenetic modifications. (2019-01-10)
A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria
In a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers, led by UConn associate professor of molecular and cell biology Spencer Nyholm, sequenced the genome of this little squid to identify unique evolutionary footprints in symbiotic organs, yielding clues about how organs that house bacteria are especially suited for this partnership. (2019-01-07)
A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed
The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. (2019-01-03)
What makes two species different?
For most of the 20th century, scientists believed that the reproductive incompatibility between species evolved gradually as a by-product of adapting to different environments. (2019-01-03)
Discovery in cell development changes understanding of how genes shape early embryos
Until now, it was unclear how this DNA packing affected development in early embryos. (2019-01-03)
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