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Current Genome News and Events, Genome News Articles.
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Genome structure of malaria parasites linked to virulence
An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology has found that malaria parasite genomes are shaped by parasite-specific gene families, and that this genome organization strongly correlates with the parasite's virulence. (2019-02-04)
Over 800 new genome regions possibly relevant to human evolution identified
Researchers at the UAB have found genetic evidence of adaptations in 2,859 regions of the human genome, including some well-known examples such as those responsible for milk tolerance or high-altitude adaptation. (2019-02-04)
How transcription factors explore the genome
EPFL scientists have discovered how proteins that regulate gene transcription can scan and bind the genome efficiently. (2019-01-30)
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
Genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. (2019-01-30)
Huge step forward in decoding genomes of small species
For the first time, scientists have read the whole genetic code of one single mosquito. (2019-01-29)
Kick-starting the genome in early development
We can think of the egg and sperm as information capsules with stored instructions for starting a new life, but post fertilisation, what kick starts the interpretation of these instructions? (2019-01-28)
PopPUNK advances speed of bacterial pathogen surveillance
In a study published today in Genome Research, researchers developed PopPUNK (Population Partitioning Using Nucleotide K-mers), a computational tool for analyzing tens of thousands of bacterial genomes in a single run, up to 200-fold faster than previous methods. (2019-01-24)
Sci-fi to reality: Superpowered salamander may hold the key to human regeneration
Scientists at the Unviersity of Kentucky have assembled the entire genome of the Mexican Axolotl, the key to unlocking the secrets of regeneration with potential for life-changing clinical applications down the road. (2019-01-24)
Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn
Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute suggests. (2019-01-22)
Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA
Scientists have traditionally thought that DNA binding proteins use patterns in the genome's code of As, Cs, Ts, and Gs to guide them to the right location, with a given protein only binding to a specific sequence of letters. (2019-01-16)
Genome doubling, cell size and novelty
In the 2019 Coulter Review, 'Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell,' published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. (2019-01-15)
Differences in genes' geographic origin influence mitochondrial function
A new study explores whether interactions between genomes found in the nucleus and in the mitochondria of a cell could be altered when genes of different geographic origins are brought together. (2019-01-14)
Mobile, instant diagnosis of viruses
In a first for plant virology, a team from CIRAD recently used nanopore technology to sequence the entire genomes of two yam RNA viruses. (2019-01-10)
New biomarker links cancer progression to genome instability
A new Tel Aviv University study identifies elevated levels of a protein called ubiquilin-4 as a new biomarker for genome instability. (2019-01-10)
New CRISPR-Cas9 variants can respond to viral proteases
Using a technique called circular permutation, researchers at the University of California Berkeley have created a new suite of Cas9 variants called Cas9-CPs, which will simplify design of Cas9-fusion proteins for diverse applications beyond simple DNA cutting, such as base editing and epigenetic modifications. (2019-01-10)
A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria
In a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers, led by UConn associate professor of molecular and cell biology Spencer Nyholm, sequenced the genome of this little squid to identify unique evolutionary footprints in symbiotic organs, yielding clues about how organs that house bacteria are especially suited for this partnership. (2019-01-07)
A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed
The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. (2019-01-03)
What makes two species different?
For most of the 20th century, scientists believed that the reproductive incompatibility between species evolved gradually as a by-product of adapting to different environments. (2019-01-03)
Discovery in cell development changes understanding of how genes shape early embryos
Until now, it was unclear how this DNA packing affected development in early embryos. (2019-01-03)
NYUAD study suggests that 'Actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation
One of the most fascinating questions in biology is how genes are regulated during development and differentiation when cells acquire a specific identity. (2018-12-31)
Producers of white colonies on kimchi surface, mistaken as molds, have been identified
Analyses of microbial community structures and whole genome sequencing were performed to the white colony-forming yeasts on kimchi surface. (2018-12-26)
Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite
Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. (2018-12-20)
Convincing evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction
Evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction has been found in a large-scale genomic analysis. (2018-12-20)
Researchers detect age-related differences in DNA from blood
The DNA markers from the blood of healthy centenarians are more similar to those of people in their 20s than people in their 70s. (2018-12-20)
Mysteries of the primrose unraveled
Plant scientists at the University of East Anglia have succeeded in unraveling the complete genome sequence of the common primrose -- the plant whose reproductive biology captivated the Victorian naturalist Charles Darwin. (2018-12-18)
Defining quality virus data(sets)
While many viruses remain unknown and uncultivated, advances in genome sequencing and analyses have allowed researchers to identify more than 750,000 uncultivated virus genomes from metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data sets. (2018-12-17)
How much are we learning? Natural selection is science's best critic
Even as they've struggled to highlight parts of the human genome worth investigating, scientists have wondered how much they're actually learning through the methods they use. (2018-12-17)
Tale of two trees: New web tool estimates gene trees with ease
Scientists introduce ORTHOSCOPE, a new web-based tool capable of inferring gene function, estimating gene trees and identifying sets of ancestral genes in just minutes. (2018-12-13)
Scientists crack the CRISPR code for precise human genome editing
Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a set of surprisingly simple rules that determine the precision of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human cells. (2018-12-13)
Noncoding mutations contribute to autism risk
A whole-genome sequencing study of nearly 2,000 families has implicated mutations in 'promoter regions' of the genome -- regions that precede the start of a gene -- in autism. (2018-12-13)
Scientists create genomic resource to explore biological underpinnings of brain disorders
A team of researchers, including scientists from UNC School of Medicine, has developed a model of unprecedented sophistication that relates variations in DNA and gene activity to the risk of brain disorders. (2018-12-13)
Faster, cheaper test can help predict risk of metastasis in prostate cancer patients
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new assay to assess copy number alterations that is cheaper, faster, reproducible, and requires less tissue than other diagnostic techniques and has the potential to significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation. (2018-12-12)
Rice plants that grow as clones from seed
Plant biologists at the UC Davis have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. (2018-12-12)
Parrot genome analysis reveals insights into longevity, cognition
Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises -- or at least its genome -- is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. (2018-12-06)
Without Dna2, genes can jump into DNA breaks
When Dna2 is absent, small DNA fragments jump from all over the genome into chromosome breaks. (2018-12-05)
First jellyfish genome reveals ancient beginnings of complex body plan
The first in-depth look at the genome of a jellyfish -- the moon jelly Aurelia aurita -- shows that early jellyfish recycled existing genes to gain the ability to morph from polyp to medusa. (2018-12-03)
Mechanism safeguarding unique epigenome of oocytes and maternal fertility
Recently, a joint research group led by Dr. ZHU Bing from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reveals that Stella sequestered UHRF1 from the nucleus through an active nuclear export process, and the dysregulation of UHRF1 by loss of Stella resulted in an accumulation of aberrant DNA methylation during postnatal oogenesis. (2018-11-28)
The warm and loving tegu lizard becomes a genetic resource
Researchers have sequenced the genome of the tegu, Salvator merianae: a lizard that has taken an evolutionary step toward warm-bloodedness. (2018-11-27)
Cancer under pressure: Visualizing the activity of the immune system on tumor development
As tumors develop, they evolve genetically. How does the immune system act when faced with tumor cells? (2018-11-27)
How ancient viruses got cannabis high
THC and CBD, bioactive substances produced by cannabis and sought by medical patients and recreational users, sprung to life thanks to ancient colonization of the plant's genome by viruses, U of T researchers have found. (2018-11-26)
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