Current Genomics News and Events

Current Genomics News and Events, Genomics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Increasingly fragmented tiger populations may require 'genetic rescue'
A new study reveals the lasting genetic impacts of increased isolation among different tiger subpopulations. (2021-02-18)

How healthy lifestyle behaviours can improve cholesterol profiles
Combining healthy lifestyle interventions reduces heart disease through beneficial effects on different lipoproteins and associated cholesterols, according to a study published February 9 in eLife. (2021-02-16)

Male sex, BMI, smoking and depression all increase biological age
A 'biological age' score predicts that being male, overweight, a smoker and having depression all contribute to biological aging, a study published today in eLife reports. (2021-02-09)

NUI Galway demonstrate the promise of precision genomics in cancer treatment
Researchers at NUI Galway have identified genomic signatures in women developing the most common type of breast cancer that can be associated with long-term survival. The NUI Galway team analysed the genomes of breast cancer patients to look for associations with survival rates using advanced statistical techniques. (2021-02-04)

Rare genetic syndrome identified, caused by mutations in gene SATB1
Variations in the gene SATB1 have been shown to cause a rare genetic syndrome. Different variations across the gene lead to varied effects on the cell, leading to a difference in the severity of neurodevelopmental disorders. Discovery of this genetic syndrome is hoped to provide information to families and individuals affected by SATB1-syndrome. (2021-01-28)

How dietary choice influences lifespan in fruit flies
Having a choice of foods may accelerate aging and shorten the lifespan of fruit flies, according to a study published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2021-01-19)

NHGRI proposes an action agenda for building a diverse genomics workforce
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has released a new action agenda for a diverse genomics workforce. This ambitious set of goals, objectives, and implementation strategies details NHGRI's plans for enhancing the diversity of the genomics workforce by 2030. (2021-01-07)

Cells resistant to treatment already present before diagnosis of adult leukaemia
This work is a collaboration between Núria López-Bigas' lab at IRB Barcelona and the groups headed by Anna Bigas (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) and Josep Maria Ribera (Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute). The results have been published in Genome Biology. (2020-12-16)

The impact of Neandertal DNA on human health
A researcher at the University of Tartu described new associations between Neandertal DNA and autoimmune diseases, prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes. (2020-12-03)

Study highlights strategies for boosting accuracy of personal genetic risk scores
As the consumer genetics industry rapidly expands, more and more people are turning to DNA-based services to learn their risk of developing a wide range of diseases. However, the risk scores from these genetic tests are not always as precise as they could be, according to a new study from Scripps Research. The scientists examine many approaches to calculating the scores and recommend that personal genomics organizations adopt standards that will raise the bar for accuracy. (2020-12-03)

Bluestar Genomics, UChicago publish whole genome map of key biomarker for detecting cancer
Bluestar Genomics, an innovative company leading the development of next-generation epigenomic approaches to cancer detection, and University of Chicago today announce the publication of a genome-wide 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) map across multiple human tissue types. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications, demonstrated the robust performance of 5hmC as a global biomarker for the detection of multiple serious illnesses, such as cancer and various chronic diseases. (2020-12-02)

Researchers simulate privacy leaks in functional genomics studies
In a study publishing November 12 in the journal Cell, a team of investigators demonstrates that it's possible to de-identify raw functional genomics data to ensure patient privacy. They also demonstrate how these raw data could be linked back to specific individuals through their gene variants by something as simple as an abandoned coffee cup if these sanitation measures are not put in place. (2020-11-12)

Yale team finds way to protect genetic privacy in research
In a new report, a team of Yale scientists has developed a way to protect people's private genetic information while preserving the benefits of a free exchange of functional genomics data between researchers. (2020-11-12)

Largest set of mammalian genomes reveals species at risk of extinction
An international team of researchers with the Zoonomia Project has released the whole genomes of more than 80 percent of all mammalian families, spanning almost 110 million years of evolution. The dataset, published in Nature, includes genomes from more than 120 species that were not previously sequenced, capturing mammalian diversity at an unprecedented scale. Zoonomia data have already helped researchers in another recent study to assess the risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 across many species. (2020-11-11)

Study of ancient dog DNA traces canine diversity to the Ice Age
A global study of ancient dog DNA, led by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, University of Oxford, University of Vienna and archaeologists from more than 10 countries, presents evidence that there were different types of dogs more than 11,000 years ago in the period immediately following the Ice Age. (2020-10-29)

Study finds 5 distinct dog types from 11,000 years ago
An international team of researchers that includes a Texas A&M University professor has studied the lineage of dogs and found that there were at least five different types of dogs as far back as 11,000 years ago. (2020-10-29)

The National Human Genome Research Institute publishes new vision for human genomics
The National Human Genome Research Institute this week published its 'Strategic vision for improving human health at The Forefront of Genomics' in the journal Nature. This vision describes the most compelling research priorities and opportunities in human genomics for the coming decade, signaling a new era in genomics for the Institute and the field. (2020-10-28)

Nature Communications publishes Bluestar Genomics' technology for cancer detection study
Bluestar Genomics, an innovative company leading the development of next-generation epigenomic approaches to early cancer detection, announced today the publication of study results in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications. The study demonstrates the power of the company's platform to detect pancreatic cancer in its early stages, addressing the unmet need of more than 60,000 patients diagnosed with the disease each year in the United States alone. (2020-10-20)

Early COVID-19 cases in Southern California linked to New York
Most COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients in Southern California during the early months of the pandemic appear to have been infected by a variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus introduced to the region from New York state via Europe, not directly from China. (2020-10-07)

Stem cells can help repair spinal cord after injury
Spinal cord injury often leads to permanent functional impairment. In a new study published in the journal Science researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that it is possible to stimulate stem cells in the mouse spinal cord to form large amounts of new oligodendrocytes, cells that are essential to the ability of neurons to transmit signals, and thus to help repair the spinal cord after injury. (2020-10-01)

App analyzes coronavirus genome on a smartphone
A team led by Garvan's Dr Ira Deveson developed the app 'Genopo' that can analyse the coronavirus genome on a portable Android device. (2020-09-29)

Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters - study
Scientists used single-cell genomics to show that two groups of poorly known marine protists routinely ingest viruses. They hypothesize that this serves to absorb phosphorus and nitrogen - that is, using viruses as food. This discovery has important implications for our understanding of oceanic food webs and carbon cycles. (2020-09-24)

Multidisciplinary approaches to solving cold cases
Forensic DNA analysis enables new and increasingly sophisticated Technology for solving cold cases. Through advances in DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, this relatively new and urgent field is enabling a broad range of cold cases, including homicides and other violent crimes, to be solved. (2020-09-23)

'Cheater mitochondria' may profit from cellular stress coping mechanisms
Cheating mitochondria may take advantage of cellular mechanisms for coping with food scarcity in a simple worm to persist, even though this can reduce the worm's wellbeing. (2020-09-22)

Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming. (2020-09-22)

Future of genomics at risk without greater public trust in how genetic data is shared
The largest ever survey on global public attitudes towards genomic research and data sharing suggests that work is needed to raise levels of public trust in how genetic data is used in order for that data to fulfil its promise to advance human health and medicine. (2020-09-17)

Discovery of an ancient dog species may teach us about human vocalization
In a study published in PNAS, researchers used conservation biology and genomics to discover that the New Guinea singing dog, thought to be extinct for 50 years, still thrives. This finding opens new doors for protecting a remarkable creature that can teach biologists about human vocal learning. (2020-08-31)

Breast cancer 'ecosystem' reveals possible new targets for treatment
Garvan researchers have used cellular genomics to uncover promising therapy targets for triple negative breast cancer. (2020-08-13)

A phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution of the mitochondrial calcium transporter
The system that regulates cellular calcium levels duplicated, generating two non-equivalent systems, some one billion years ago before fungi and animals diverged evolutionarily. The fungal models currently used for the study of mitochondrial calcium regulation are not adequate, as the system they possess is not equivalent to that of animals. Chytrids, a divergent group of fungi, would be the only fungi that possess a system similar to ours. (2020-08-12)

Gene variations at birth reveal origins of inflammation and immune disease
A study published in the journal Nature Communications has pinpointed a number of areas of the human genome that may help explain the neonatal origins of chronic immune and inflammatory diseases of later life, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. (2020-07-28)

Artificial intelligence finds patterns of mutations and survival in tumour images
Scientists have used artificial intelligence to search for patterns of molecular abnormalities in tumour tissue sections across 28 cancer types. They analysed more than 17 000 tumour microscopy images and found that the appearance of tumour cells and tissues offers insights into the underlying genetic causes. The research could help scientists develop diagnostic tools for when molecular tests are unavailable, and refine patient risk prediction (2020-07-27)

Discovery of a rare human gene mutation that causes MAIT cells to disappear
A collaboration between Monash Health, the Australian Genomics Health Alliance (AGHA) and researchers at the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute has led to the discovery of a rare single gene mutation in a patient that eliminates an immune cell population, namely MAIT cells. (2020-07-24)

Research breakthrough in fight against chytrid fungus
For frogs dying of the invasive chytridiomycosis disease, the leading cause of amphibian deaths worldwide, the genes responsible for protecting them may actually be leading to their demise, according to a new study published today in the journal Molecular Ecology by University of Central Florida and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) researchers. (2020-07-23)

Non-invasive blood test can detect cancer four years before conventional diagnosis methods
An international team of researchers has developed a non-invasive blood test that can detect whether an individual has one of five common types of cancers, four years before the condition can be diagnosed with conventional methods. The test detects stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver cancer. The test detected cancer in 91% of samples from individuals who were asymptomatic when the samples were collected and were only diagnosed with cancer one to four years later. (2020-07-21)

Novel biomarker technology for cancer diagnostics
A new way of identifying cancer biomarkers has been developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden. The new technology allows very sensitive, quick and cost-effective identification of cancer biomarkers. The research is published in Nature Communication Biology. (2020-07-15)

NHGRI researchers generate complete human X chromosome sequence
Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have produced the first end-to-end DNA sequence of a human chromosome. The results, published today in the journal Nature, show that generating a precise, base-by-base sequence of a human chromosome is now possible, and will enable researchers to produce a complete sequence of the human genome. (2020-07-14)

Janggu makes deep learning a breeze
Researchers from the MDC have developed a new tool that makes it easier to maximize the power of deep learning for studying genomics. They describe the new approach, Janggu, in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-07-13)

Tackling coral reefs' thorny problem
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have revealed the evolutionary history of the crown-of-thorns starfish -- a predator of coral that can devastate coral reefs. Their findings shed light on how the populations of these starfish have changed over time and could potentially help reduce their ecological destruction. (2020-07-08)

Does genomics perpetuate inequality?
A new Hastings Center special report takes a critical look at the role of genomics in perpetuating racism and inequality. (2020-07-08)

Repurposing public health systems to decode COVID-19
Research published in the journal Microbial Genomics describes how national surveillance systems can be linked with the UK Biobank. This pooled data could then be used to understand how genetics and other epidemiological factors impact risk of developing severe infection. (2020-07-07)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.